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LIBRARY OF THE 




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For Participating and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



!X"Vol. 1'). No. 2 Febm 




A new exhibition and Naturemax film pro- 
file a stunning array of the marine worlds 
evolutionary wonders, including (clock- 
wise, from top) the gentle whale shark a 
17-foot-long great white, and an encounter 
between a safety diver and a blue shark. 




Sharks! Fact and Fantasy 

Exhibition opens in Gallery 3: Friday, February 4 
Members' preview: Thursday, February J 



They swam in ancient seas more 
than 450 million years ago. long be- 
fore any backboned animals walked 
on land. They have existed three 
times as long as dinosaurs, more than 
100 times as long as humans, and 
their basic blueprint has changed little 
over the last 100 million years. The 
new exhibition Sharks! Fact and 
Fantasy profiles these often-misunder- 
stood evolutionary marvels 

Visitors walk through an underwa- 
ter habitat in which special lighting 
creates the illusion of sunlight filtering 
through water and audio effects simu- 

tlate an ocean environment. A dozen 



,nch catshark to a 20-foot-long white 
: k illustrate the tremendous van- 
ety among species. An animated gray 
reef shark responds to a distressed 
fish's Mailings with a threat display — 
back arched, lowered pectoral fins, 
and head and tail wagging. Intera 
exhibits explore shark biology and 
show how these animals adapted to 
make thi »f their environments, 

developing highly specialized senses 
!ight, hearing, and smell 
People the world over have repre- 
sented sharks in myth and legend, 
literature, advertising, and art. and 
these images have influenced the 
understanding of sharks as animals 



The exhibition concludes with a look 
at sharks in human culture and as an 
economic resource. Examples from 

the icts are 

displayed, including a sandpaper used 
by the Chumash Indians slur, 
shark Uvei oil, and them 
lal deco 
tive. and as jewelry. Sharks as a 

irceforrei id commer- 

cial fishing are at and the 

ma, ..,11, and medical uses of 

sharks are shov. 

Sharks! Fact and I «n- 

sored by the National Sc i ■"" 

dation and was organized by the 
Natural History Museum of Los Ange- 



les County It will be mm displa] 
lughMa; 

Members' Events 

Pardi iparJngond 1 1 lembers 

can 

lay, Febm rom 

h. and a private view- 
ing of the new N-. in 

for the I 

See page 9 foi ■ I* '- "I ■ 

ither Men 
Satu 
birthday theme part 

,rJcscuratoi and guided to 
Further information appears on 
page 9. 




A Society of 
Wolves 

Thursday, 
February 17 

The controversial issue of 
reintroducing wolves to Yel- 
lowstone National Park and 



other areas will be discussed 
at the Members' program A 
Society of Wolves. A park 
ranger for 32 seasons, Rick 
Mi Intyre has spent 16 years 
observing wild wolves in 
Alaska and Montana and two 
years studying a captive wolf 
pack. Hell talk about the 
social behavior of packs, pup 



rearing, wolf-prey relations, 
and the interactions between 
humans and wolves. 

The program will take 
place at 700 p.m. in the 
Kaufmann Theater. Tickets 
are $8 for Members and $11 
for non-Members Use the 
February Members' programs 
coupon on page 3 to register. 







The Yueh Lung Shadow Theatre 









Traditional 

Shadow 

Theater 

Tuesday, February 1 

I lie classical legends of the 
East were transmitted from 
generation to generation by 
ii iiu rant shadow masters. 
These practitioners of a 



2,000-year-old Chinese folk 
art presented dramas based 
on concepts from religion, 
folk tales, and epic literature. 
A cast of heroes, demons, 
and other supernatural char- 
acters i tun updated from 
behind a back-lit screen, ap- 
pear as glowing animated 
figures that illustrate ideals of 
social behavior and basic 
moral values shared by all 
civilizations 
The Yueh Lung Shadow 



Theatre is the only company 
of its kind in America. Their 
performance, which is pre- 
sented in celebration of the 
Chinese New Year, is geared 
toward audiences ages 8 and 
older. The program will take 
place at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Kaufmann Theater. Tickets 
are $7 for Members and $10 
for non-Members. Call the 
Membership Office at (212) 
769-5606 for information 
about ticket availability 



Saving Grace 
at Angkor Wat 

Tuesday, February 8 



The ancient monument sites 
of Cambodia, including the 
twelfth-century temples and 
monasteries of Angkor Wat, 
are among the world's great 
wonders. The region's archi- 
k i tural treasures are under 
increasing pressure from 20 
years of war and civil strife, 
looters, and development as a 
tourist attraction. Bonnie Burn- 
ham, executive director of the 



World Monuments Fund, will 
discuss the conservation and 
restoration efforts initiated by 
the fund and other interna- 
tional cultural institutions. 
The program will take 
place at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Kaufmann Theater. Admis- 
sion is $6 for Members and 
$9 for non-Members; use the 
February Members' programs 
coupon on page 3 to register 



Members' 
Workshops on 

Earth History 

Wednesdays, 
February 16 and 23 



Geologist Sidney Horen- 
stein, the Museum's coordina- 
tor of environmental public 
programs, will host a pair of 
workshops that reveal why 
rocks are the pages of earth's 
history. Participants will use 
paleographic maps to see the 



continuous movement of the 
continents over time, and 
they'll work with charts and 
diagrams to learn how ra- 
dioactivity helps to determine 
the age of rocks. They'll also 
see how fossils contribute to 
deciphering the sequence of 
layered rocks. 

The workshops will take 
place from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m 
Tickets are $40 and available 
only to Participating and 
Higher Members. Use the 
coupon on page 5 to register, 
and please note that tickets 
are available only by mail. 



Members' Day Trip to 

Ellis Island 

Sunday, February 27 



SOLD OUT 

From Previous Issue 

From 1892 to 1954 the 
depot at Ellis Island processed 
some 17 million people — 
the greatest tide of immigra- 
tion in the nation's history. 
The main building was refur- 
bished in time for the depot's 
centennial in 1992, and the 
restoration project's center- 
piece is a museum of more 
than 30 galleries filled with 



artifacts, historic photos, 
posters, maps, oral histories, 
and ethnic music. 

Historian Joyce Gold will 
escort Members on a trip to 
Ellis Island that begins in 
Lower Manhattan with a look 
at vestiges of the city's earli- 
est immigration. Gold will 
continue her presentation 
aboard the ferry and inside 
the museum's Great Hall. A 
museum staff member will 
take participants on a brief 
behind-the-scenes tour, and 
there will be ample time for 
individual exploration. 

The trip will take place 
from 9:30 am to 3:30 p.m 
Tickets are $25 and available 
only to Participating and 
Higher Members. 




ISSN 0194-6110 

Vol. 19. No. 2 
February 1994 

Donna Bell — Editor 

Sheila Greenberg — Manager of Membership Services 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Yolanda Loften — Fulfillment Coordinator 

Risa Miller — Program Coordinator 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and Higher 
Members of the American Museum of Natural History, is 
published monthly September through June, bimonthly July and 
August. Publication offices are at Natural History magazine, 
American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th 
Street, New York, NY 10024-5192. Telephone: (212) 769- 
5606. Subscriptions: $50 a year for Participating Membership: 
$100 a year for Contributor Membership. © 1994 American 
Museum of Natural History. Second-class postage paid at New 
York. NY Postmaster: Please send address changes to: 
Rotunda. Membership Office, American Museum of Natural 
I listory, Central Park West at 79th Street. New York, NY 
10024-5192 

Printed by Waldon Press, Inc., New York 



Invitation to Geology: A Beginners* Guide 

Tuesday, March 22, and Thursday, March 24 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$12 for Members, $20 for non-Members 



Geologist Sidney Horen- 
stein will present a two-part 
lecture series on our dynamic 
planet that introduces the 
basic aspects of geology. By 
studying the record of past 
changes written upon the 
face of the earth, we can not 
only see the geologic past but 
also infer what the future may 

hold. 

The lectures will investigate 



the movement of continents, 
volcanic activity, and earth- 
quakes. In addition to their 
disastrous effects, earthquakes 
are a continuous source of 
data for analysts of the earth' s 
interior. Horenstein will de- 
scribe these and other natural 
processes such as the wearing 
down of mountains, the ele- 
vation of continents, and the 
melting of rocks. Long before 



the phenomena of drifting 
continents and interacting 
plates were recognized, geol- 
ogists were aware of the con- 
tinuous creation, alteration, 
and degradation of rocks. 
Participants will learn about 
current ideas of how life origi- 
nated and our place in the 
universe. 

Use the coupon at right to 
register. 



February Members' 
Programs Coupon 



Name 






• Address: 



Learn 



about the formation of the Palisades 



Members' Tour 

Ecology 
of North 
America 

Friday, March 18 
3:00, 4:30, 
and 6:00 p.m. 
$16, and open only 
to Participating and 
Higher Members 

Join geologist Sidney 
Horenstein for a trip around 
North America that will view 
some of the continent's major 
ecological systems in their 
natural and undisturbed set- 
tings. The tour will look at 
Museum dioramas and partic- 
ipants will leam how these 
regions were altered by 
human contact. 

Horenstein, who is the 
Museum's coordinator of 
environmental public pro- 
grams, will lead participants 
through several of the Mu- 
seum's exhibition halls, in- 
cluding North American 
Forests. Mammals, and Birds. 
He'll discuss regional vegeta- 
tion and climate and point out 
how geology is a factor in 
habitats 

Use the coupon on page 5 
to register, and please note 
that tickets are available only 
by mail 



City 



.State 



.Zip: 



i 
i 





Daytime telephone: . — . 

Membership category: 

Total amount enclosed. 

i 

Please make check (if applicable) payable to the American j 
Museum of Natural History and mail with a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope to February Members 
Proqrams. Membership Office. American Museum ol 
Natural History. Central Park West at 79th Street, New 
York, NY 10024 5192. Telephone reservations are not 
accepted. No refunds or exchanges. 
Unless otherwise indicated, no more than eight 
tickets may be ordered for a program. Participat- 
ing Members are entitled to four tickets per 
program at the Members' price. Higher Members 
are entitled to six tickets, and Associate Members 
are entitled to one ticket. 

Members' private viewing at Naturemax 

Thursday, February 3, 7:30 p.m. 
Number of Members' tickets at $6: — 
Total amount enclosed for program: — 

Angkor Wat. Tuesday. February 8. 7:00 p.m. 
Number of Meml>. etsat$6: — 

Number of additional i ' — 

Total amount enclosed for program: — 

Society of Wolves. 1 Inn ■ I., February 17. 7 .00pm 
Number of Meml h , tickets il $8: — 
Number of additional tickets at $11: — 
Total amount enclosed for program: — 

Fascinating Fossils. Friday, February 25. 7.00 p.m 
Number of free Members tu I 

(no more than 2. please): — 
Number of additional Members tickets at $5:_ 
Number of non-Members' tickets at $8: — 
Total amount enclosed for program: — 

Members' Tours of Sharks! Friday, March 4 
Please indicate a first, second, and third choice. 

_ 4.00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. 

6:00 p.m. 7:00 p.m. 

Number of free Members' tickets 

(no more than 2. please): — 

The World of Animals. Saturday. March 5 
Please indicate a first and second choice. 

11 30 a.m. 1:30 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $5: — 
Number of additional tickets at $8: — 
Total amount enclosed for program: — 

A Night Out with the Neandertals 

Thursday, March H> .7 00 p.m. 
Number of Members 1 1« kets at $10: — 
Number of additional tickets at $15: — 
Total amount enclosed for program: — 

Artistic Expression in an Amazonian Culture 

Friday. March 1 1 , 7 00 p m 
Number of Members' tickets at $7: — 
Number of addition^ Hcketsal $10 _ 
Total amount enclosed for program: — 

Invitation to Geology 

Tuesday. March 22, and Thursday. March 24. 7:00 p m 
Number of Member — 

Number of additional ft I 20: — 

Total amount enclosed for program: — 

The Samaritans and Jews of India 

Wednesday. March 30. 7 00 p m 
Number of Members' tickets at $7. — 
Number of additional tickets at $10: — 
Total amount enclosed for program: — 



Museum 



dioramas illustrate regional ecology 



NOTE Orders received less than ten days before 
show dates will be held for pickup at the door on 
the dav of the program if tickets are still available. If 
an event is soW out. you will be advised in wntmg or 
by phone and your check will be returned. 



The World of Animals 

Saturday, March 5 
11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. 

£tr Mentis for non-Members 
Appropriate for ages 5 through adult 



Members will see a live 5- 
foot-long iguana in the Kauf- 
mann Theater and learn how 
wild iguanas are helping to 
restore the rain forests in 
Colombia and Costa Rica. 
Naturalist Bill Robinson will 
bring some of his wild fnends 
to the Museum next month to 
discuss their roles in nature 
and offer live demonstraii-i i 
of their adaptations for sill 

viv.il 

Robinson will explain some 
of the many ways in whu h 



animals trick each other to 
avoid being eaten or to scare 
up a meal. A brush-tailed 
porcupine will rub its quills 
together to make a cobra-like 
sound that frightens away 
predators. Another guest, a 
1 10-pound alligator snapping 

:.-. disguises its tongu. 
a wriggling worm that lures 
unsuspecting fish right down 

its throat, 

Among the other animals 
appearing at the show will be 
a huge African pouch rat 



that's 3 feet long and weighs 
8 pounds. Alrican eagles that 
will fly around the room, and 
an enormous python. 

Robinson, who presents his 
dramatic wildlife programs to 
thousands of schoolchildren 
each year, has appeared at 
the Museum for the past 14 
years. Please note that all 
attendees, parents and chil- 
dren alike, must have tickets. 
Use the February Members 
programs coupon on page 3 
to register. 



The Samaritans 
and Jews of India 

Wednesday, March 30 

7:00 p.m. 

^^Me'nT" $10 for non-Members 






Members' Adult-Child Workshop I? «-*«»• i 

The Mouse in the Matzoh Factory 

Sunday, March 20 

llfi^S^^^ p-**— and Hi8her Membcrs 

Appropriate for ages 5-8 




The mouse is back! Next 
month he'll make his fifth 
annual appearance at the 

mi for a special 
Passover program of songs, 
laughter, and matzoh making 
Author Francine Medoft 
read her story The Mouse In 
the Matzoh Factory, and 
then each child will help her 



the dough for matzoh. 
Participants will take the 
dough home with them to 
bake in their own kitchei is 
A former nursery school 
teacher. Medoff is a working 
artist and a part-time adminis- 
trator at the Hebrew School 
of Temple Beth Israel in Port 
Washington. New York. The 



program lasts approximately 
45 minutes and is appropriate 
for children between the ages 
of 5 and 8. Please note that 
all attendees must have tick- 
ire available only 
by mail. Members are limited 
to two tickets per request for 
this popular show; use the 
coupon on page 5 to register. 




Two intriguing documen- 
taries about dwindling Jewish 
communities offer a look at 
vanishing ways of life. Film- 
maker Johanna Spector will 
introduce and comment on 
her documentaries The 
Samaritans and Jews of 

India. 

The rituals and lifestyles ot 
a Middle Eastern population 
that separated from the Jew- 
ish mainstream more than 
2.500 years ago are the focus 
oi The Samaritans Consid- 
ering themselves Hebrews 
rather than Jews, the Samari- 
tans' practices and rites are 
derived from the Samaritan 
Pentateuch, akin to the 
Torah, rather than the Tal- 
mud and Bible. Their obser- 
vances are not influenced by 
Judaic interpretation and 
offer a fascinating contrast to 
those of modem Judaism, 
since the Samaritans observe 
the Sabbath, holidays, festi- 
vals, and the Passover 
Paschal lamb sacrifice much 
as they were observed 2.000 

years ago. 

The film is a remarkable 
ethnographic record of a 
little-known people who once 
numbered in the hundreds of 
thousands and lived through- 
out the Levant and Egypt. 
Now they dwell only in two 
small enclaves — one in the 
city of Holon, Israel, the 
other in the city of Nablus. on 
the West Bank of the Jordan 
— and these communities 
numbered fewer than 450 
individuals at the time of the 
filming. The 1971 film is 30 
minutes long. 

About the Jews of India. 
Shanwar Telis or Bene Israel 
portrays the Jewish commu- 
nity of Bombay, which num- 
bered only 6.000 (about 
one-quarter of its original size 
when the film was finished in 
1978. Most of these Indian 



Jews migrated to Israel, and 
their motivation to do so was 
on religious grounds rather 
than an avoidance of persecu- 
tion. The tolerance with 
which Jews have been treated 
in India distinguishes them 
from all other diaspora com- 
munities 

The Jews of this region 
lived in small enclaves in the 
villages around Bombay, spe- 
cializing as producers and 
sellers of palm oil Their 
Marathi name, Shanwar Telis 
(Saturday oil pressers), indi- 
cates that they refrained from 
selling oil on the Sabbath. In 
addition to keeping the Sab- 
bath, this group maintained 
only a bare minimum of reli- 
gious observance until the 
1800s. when British rule 
brought prosperity to Bom- 
bay and many of the Shanwar 
Telis moved to the city. There 
they encountered for the first 
time Jews from other com- 
munities, from whom they 
learned Sephardic Jewish 
ritual and under whose influ- 
ence their lives came to re- 
semble those of other 
diaspora communities: they 
built synagogues, translated 
religious texts into local di- 
alects, and started religious 
schools and other communal 
institutions. The film is 40 

minutes long. 
Anthropologist Johanna 

Spector, who is a music 
ethnologist as well as a film- 
maker and director, will intro- 
duce the films and answer 
questions from the audience 
afterward. Spector' s film 
2,000 Years of Freedom 
and Honor. The Cochin 
Jews of India premiered at 
the Museum in 1992. as did 
her documentary Jews of 
Yemen in 1986. 

Use the February Members 
programs coupon on page -> 
to register for the program 



A Night Out with the Neandertals 



Thursday, March 10 

7:00 p.m. 

Main Auditorium 

$10 for Members, $15 for non-Members 



The European and Near 
Eastern Neandertals are the 
best and longest known of the 
premodem humans, and 
theirs is a primary role in the 
study of modern human ori- 
gins. Anthropologist Erik 
Trinkaus believes that at least 
one variant of the Neandertal 
strain may have shared some 
of its genes with anatomically 
modern human beings and 
that some or all of us today 
may be closer kin to Neander- 
tals than most people realize. 

At A Night Out with the 
Neandertals Trinkaus will 
review current images of the 
Neandertals. the history of 
ideas regarding their role in 



modem human origins, and 
their ancestor-descendant 
relationship to us. He'll focus 
on the current understanding 
of who the Neandertals were 
— in terms of appearance, 
capabilities, and behavior — 
as reflected by their anatomy, 
robusticity, stress levels, de- 
mography, technology, and 
social behavior Clues from 
both Neandertal fossils and 
their associated archeological 
remains will be discussed, and 
Trinkaus will show slides of 
this evidence along with im- 
ages of the Neandertals 
through the past century. 

Professor and chairman of 
the Department of Anthro- 



pology at the University of 
New Mexico. Trinkaus has 
been a research associate of 
the University of Bordeaux 
since 1986 He is the author 
of The Shanidar Neander- 
tals (1983). which concerns 
his work in the restoration 
and primary description of 
the Neandertals from 
Shanidar Cave. Iraq His most 
recent publication. In Search 
of the Neandertals: Soluing 
the Puzzle of Human 0\ I 
gms (1993), which he co- 
wrote with Pat Shipman. is a 
gripping story of evolutionary 
discoveries and deb.i 

Use the coupon on page 3 
to register for the program. 



Artistic Expression in an 
Amazonian Culture 



Yale University on Wauja political organization Theater. 

Members' programs coupon on page 3 to register. ^^^^^ 





Members' Workshop on 

Japanese Cuisine 

Sunday, March 6 .«««.« o^ 

11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:00-3:30 p.m. 
$20, and open only to Participating 
and Higher Members 
Appropriate for ages 16 and up 



fections, and kombu, a form 
of seaweed thai s the basic 
ingredient of Japanese soup 
and stot k. Kombu is also 
prepared as a vegetable or 
made into salted or sweet- 
ened 

Kinney will explain whal 

each ingredient band howit 

i, used in preparing many of 

the foods thai Ament. 

ij in Japanese restaui 

,v,M,tiiH'ntof 
participants 
wiU try i" Identify whl< h ingre 
dients were used In tto 

I [ost nid producer of W 
Meets l asl on Vision Cable 
in New lersey, Pat Kinro 
hasworked clos the 

lapanes mmunity In 

Greater New York for a do/en 
years. She has produ. i ■. I a 
lesol television Interviews 
i.ipan for I uji Sankel and 
has taught .i..|>.mesecool 
at the New School. Bio 
dale's, and Kin | "ig 

dies Kinney v 
l.„ column for Bergen i Hie 
Record Neighbors fn >n i 

I. ,| .■!! i.>i'. 

in the New York are. < fills 
i , ill nnii also appears in Jomo 
mbun In lapan 

TU mo mn, in. itation 

will take place in the 1 dith ( 

Blum i ei ture R n ' : "' l1 "' 

, i iupon I ""' 

please note that ticket 
available onl] by I 



Pat Kinney 



Members will say olshll 
desu ("tastes delu lous | «>t a 
special workshop in whi( h 
Japanese culinary traditions 
and their relations to folkl<». 
are explored ["hey 1 1 also take 
a look at Japanese dining and 
tea-drinking etiquette and 
pick up a few tips on eatm! 

with i hopsticks 

Most Pat Kinney will Inb 
,. several ingredients typl 
cal to Japanese cuisine and 
offer tastings. Q and 

flavorings such as shoga 

rn.l ao nori (a 

i vegetable) will be sam 
pled Participants will ta 

azuki. the red beans that are 
sweetened and used in con- 



Membership Workshops and Tours I -upon to 

reqlster for A Saturday with the Sharks and Workshops on 
Earth History Indicate a find and ,, ond choice of times 
for Mouse in the Matxoh Factory. Ecology ofNntth 
Amerl< a and lapanes* ' ulslne 



Name(s) of program(s): 



Number of tickets and price (please indicate which program 
if more than one): ■ 



Total amount enclosed:. 
Name: 



Address: 
City: — 



State 



.Zip: 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category:. 



Please make check payable to the American Museum of 
„ and ll With a -"addressed stamped 

envelope to- Workshops ami I M^bersn'P J 

American Museum of Natural I l. ; . ; -Central Park Vv. 
79th Street. New York. NY 10024-51 









The Accelerating Global Crisis: 
Meeting the Challenges 

Tuesdays, February 15 and 22 

7:30 p.m. 
Main Auditorium 

Free 



Urban and cultural global 
challenges and solutions are 
disi ussed by prominent schol- 
ars, commentators, and edu- 
cators in a series of publu 
fomms Moderator for both 
paueU will be James I 
Shield li professor and 
director of the Japan Initia- 
This series is presented 
MuuDepartn. 
in Association with the Japan 
In.uative/City College of the 
City University of New York. 
For free tickets send a s« II 

addressed, stamped envelope 
and your request to Multicul- 
tural Outreach Programs. 
Education Department. 
American Museum of Natural 
I iisiory, Central Park West at 
79th Street, New York. NY 
10024-5192. Be sure to 
indicate the number of tickets 
and the program dates 

For additional information 
call (212) 769-5315. 



Understanding the 
Global Crisis: The Role 
of Ethnicity, Religion, 
and Nationalism 
Tuesday, February 15 

Benjamin R. Barber is 
Whitman Professor of Politi- 
cal Science, Rutgers Univer- 
sity, and author of An 
Aristocracy of Everyone 
(1992) and The Congress o/ 
p U 188). He will dis- 

cuss the two axial principles 
of our age. globalization and 
tribalism, and the ways in 
which they are in conflict and 
pose a serious threat to 
democracy. 

Panelists: Emiko Ohnuki- 
tiemey is William F. Vilas 
Professor of Anthropology, 
University of Wisconsin, and 
a visiting professor at the 
Center for Study of World 
Religions at Harvard Univer- 
sity Martin Espada is a recipi- 



An Educational Spring 



Robert Pollack, author of Signs of Life, 
lectures on February 24 



ent of the PEN/Revson Foun- 
dation Fellowship for his po- 
etry collection Rebellion IS 
the Circle of a Lover's 
Hands. 

Global Renewal: 
The Search East and 
West for Philosophical 
and Spiritual Vision 
Tuesday, February 22 

Author Hortense Calisher 
is a former president of both 
the American Academy and 
Institute of Arts and Letters 
and of the PEN American 
Center. Her work examines 
many of the issues and ques- 
tions around which this series 
is centered. 

Panelists include Maxine 
Greene, William F. Russell 
Professor Emeritus at 
Columbia University, who is 
one of the world's foremost 
philosphers of education. 




places. Monday March 7. 
7:00-830 p.m. $13.50 for 
Members. $15 for non- 
Members. 




This month the Education 
Department will begin a se- 
ries of lectures, field trips, and 
workshops that take place 
throughout the spring. Use 
the coupon on page 7 to 
register for the following pro- 
qrams. and for additional 
information call (212) 769- 

5310. 

Mustang: 

The Opening of a 

Forbidden Himalayan 

Kingdom 

North of the great ice 
ranges of the Himalayas lies 
the remote kingdom of Mus- 
tang, one of the last of 
Nepal's semi-autonomous 



principalities. A sanctuary of 
Tibetan culture. Mustang 
preserves an ancient way of 
life ravaged elsewhere by 
modernization and the Chi- 
nese occupation of Tibet. 

In a lecture illustrated with 
slides. Edwin Bembaum. a 
mountaineer and scholar of 
comparative literature and 
mythology, recounts his re- 
cent journey to Mustang, on 
which he led one of the first 
groups allowed into the for- 
bidden kingdom. Bernbaum 
examines problems facing the 
kingdom, including preserva- 
i ion of a unique culture and 
environment and the ways in 
which such efforts may serve 
as a model for other isolated 



Benjamin R. Barber will speak on February 15 



Volcanoes: 

Their Eruptions and 

Emanations 

Volcanic eruptions are 
spectacular, vivid signs of our 
dynamic earth. Sidney Horen- 
stein, coordinator of environ- 
mental public programs, will 
use slides and videotapes to 
illustrate why eruptions occur; 
the variety, origin, and distri- 
bution of volcanoes: and their 
effect on the history of life 
and the evolution of the 
earth's atmosphere. Mon- 
days, March 7 and 14, 
7 00-830 p.m. $22.50 
for Members. $25 for non- 
Members. 

Evolution Follies: 
A Darwinian 
Entertainment 

What was the "hidden 
agenda" of the Beagle's cap- 
tain during Darwin's voyage? 
Why did the Sioux Indians 
help evolutionists gather di- 
nosaur bones in the midst of 
a war? How did Thomas 
Huxley get arrested for "run- 
ning a disorderly house"? 
Anthropologist, historian of 
science, lyricist, and senior 
editor of Natural History 
magazine, Richard Milner 
mixes little-known anecdotes 
about Victorian scientists with 
creative songs about Darwin, 
Huxley, and evolution The 
program offers a witty and 
unorthodox view of 
nineteenth-century natural 
history based on The Ency 
clopedia of Evolution. Hu- 
manity's Search for Its 
Origins, Milner s book. 
Thursday. April 7, 
7 00-830 pm $13.50 for 
Members. $15 for non 
Members. 



Ancestors: 

The Search for Our 

Human Origins 

Paleoanthropologist Don- 
ald Johanson offers a behind- 
the-scenes look at his new 
television series Ancestors: 
The Search for Our Human 
Origins. Author of the con- 
troversial bestseller Lucy. The 
Beginnings of Humankind. 
he will highlight elements 
from the series, which is a 
special television event cele- 
brating the twenty-fifth an- 
niversary of the acclaimed 
science series NOVA. 
Monday. February 14. 
7.00-830 p.m. $22.50 
for Members. $25 for non- 
Members. 



Signs of Life: The 
Language and 
Meanings of DNA 

Robert Pollack, a prize- 
winning biologist, offers a 
fresh look at nature's most 
wondrous chemical. DNA 
This perspective is taken from 
the intersection of molecular 
biology with semiotics in the 
reading of DNA as texts. 
Thursday. February 24. 
7 00-8.30 D.m $22.50 for 
Members. $25 for non- 
Members. 



Native New Yorkers 

This series examines Native 
American life from prehistoric 
times through the colonial 
period and into the modem 
era. It will focus on the effects 
of European colonization on 
Indian people in the New 
York area during the seven- 
teenth century. The series is 
presented by Robert S 
Grumet. ethnologist and 
archeologist. Mid-Atlantic 
Region of the National Park 
Service Four Monday 



euenings. starting February 
28, 7.30-9.00 p.m. $31.50 
for Members. $35 for non- 
Members. 



Tropical Rain Forest 
Conservation in 
Madagascar: 
The Making of a 
National Park 

Ranomafana National Park, 
located in southeastern Mada- 
gascar, was created with the 
intention of integrating con- 
servation and development. 
Patricia C. Wright, associate 
professor in the anthropology 
department at SUNY Stony 
Brook, will discuss her role in 
the park's establishment, her 
work in the rain forest with 
lemurs, and other scientific 
efforts such as beekeeping, 
biodiversity studies of rice 
paddies, and conservation 
education. Thursday, March 
3. 7 00-8 30 p.m. $13.50 
for Members. $15 for non- 
Members. 



Forests of North 
America 

Centering on superb ex- 
hibits in the Hall of North 
American Forests, this series 
will examine the plants of 
North American old-growth 
forests together with those ot 
the prevalent younger 
growth. Temperate rain 
forests, mountain and lowland 
forests of pine, spruce-fir 
forests, deciduous forests, ana 
swamps are among the areas 
to be explored. Slide-illus- 
trated lectures followed by 
visits to the exhibits will stress 
identification and ecology 
Four Monday afternoons. 
February 28-March 21. 
2.30-4:00 p.m.. or four 



(continued on page 7) 



\n Educational Spring 

continued from page 6) 



Thursday evenings. Febru- 
ary 24-March 1 7 
7 00-830 p.m. $3150 for 
Members. $35 for non- 
Members. 

Field Trips and Adult 
Workshops 

Animal Drawing 

After the Museum has 
closed to the public, students 
will gather to draw animals 
from the famed habitat 
groups as well as individual 
mounted specimens. Stephen 
C. Quinn. naturalist and assis- 
tant manager in the Exhibi- 
tion Department, discusses 
drawing technique, animal 
anatomy, the role of the artist 
at the Museum, field sketches, 
and how exhibits are made. 
Eight Tuesdays. March 

1-April 19. 700-9.00 p.m. 

$105 (no discount for 
Members). Materials not 
included; limited to 25 
people 

Walking Tour: Spring 
Flowers and Trees in 
Central Park 



Participants on a two-hour 
morning walk in Central Park 
observe botanical signs of 
spring. They'll leam about 
plant identification and ecol- 
ogy from William Schiller, 
lecturer in botany for the 
Education Department. Sat- 
urdays. April 23 or 30. or 
Wednesday. May 4, 9.00- 
11 00 am $15 per walk (no 
discount for Members). Lim- 
ited to 25 people. 

Weekend for Bird 
Enthusiasts 

Participants on this two-day 
trip take a bus to wooded 



areas near New York City 
and the Pine Ban-ens of New 
Jersey. The group is accom- 
modated overnight near 
Toms River. The tour contin- 
ues to Brigantine National 
Wildlife Refuge, where many 
marsh birds as well as wood- 
land species can be seen. 
This trip is led by Jay Pitoc- 
chelli. research associate in 
the Department of Ornithol- 
ogy and professor of biology 
at Saint Anselm College. Call 
(212) 769-5310 for the 
itinerary and application 
Saturday and Sunday. May 
14 and 15. $175 (double 
occupancy, no discount for 
Members). Limited to 36 
adults 



Weekend Whale 
Watch off Cape Cod 

Spend a weekend whale 
watching off the rich feeding 
grounds of Stellwagen Bank, 
near Cape Cod, where sev- 
eral species of whales are 
commonly seen at close 
range. Our search for these 
magnificent creatures involves 
three 4-hour private charter 
cruises from Provincetown In 
addition to the marine biolo- 
gists aboard the boat, two 
Museum staff members will 
accompany the group: Brad 
Bumham, senior instructor in 
natural science in the Educa- 
tion Department, and natural- 
ist Stephen C. Quinn. who 
will assist in identifying the 
many species of coastal birds. 
Call (212) 769-5310 for the 

itinerary and application 
Friday-Sunday. May 20-^. 
$400 (double occupancy; no 
discount for Members). Lim- 
ited to 45 adults. 



SESssssrtsssstti 

Natural History for: 

Id^iiSiSion is requested^! ££* ™ -be 

769-5310. Please pnnt. 



Course 



No. tickets Price/ticket Total 



Course 



-No^ickeTTTnc^Tu^r^f^ 



Course 



ISo^hlkltTTric^Ttick^^ 



Course 



No. tickets Price/ticket Total 



Shaman Ritual 

Practice, Performance, 
and Metaphor 



Name: 




Daytime telephone: 



Please make checK payable -to the ^^d 
Natural History and mail with **™^ D 7parXmenl. 
envelope to: Lecture Sent «. Bd^ HJep ^ ^ 

American Museum of Natura History ^en 
79th Street. New York. NY 10024 51VZ. 



Korean shamans are ritual 
specialists who contact the 
gods and ancestors on behalf 
of human clients. Through 
drama, dance, song, and 
mime, shamans invoke the 
spirits to address all manner 
of problems 

This conference and per- 
formance examine the Ko- 
rean shaman's world from 
several perspectives: shamans 
in contemporary life: what it 
means to become a shaman, 
the work shamans perfonn 
on behalf of the community, 
shaman rituals in sacred and 
secular settings, and the influ- 
ence of shaman ritual on 
traditional and contemporary 

arts. 

The American Museum 
presents these programs in 
association with the Asia 
Society's Festival of Korea. 
The conference events on 
Saturday, February 26, will be 
held at the American Museum 
and those on Sunday. Febru- 
ary 27, at the Asia Society, 
which is located at 725 Park 

Avenue at 70th Street. The 
kosa blessing ceremony on 
Saturday is free and no tickets 
are necessary. Conference 
tickets are $12 for Members 
of the American Museum and 
the Asia Society and $15 for 
non-Members. For additional 
information call the Education 
Department at (212) 769- 
5315 or the Asia Society at 
(212)517-AS1A All tickets 
can be purchased by calling 
the Asia Society. Tickets for 
the Chindo Sikkim Kut must 
be purchased separately 
through the Asia Society. 



and Saturday, February 2' 
8:00 p.m.. and at 7:00 P "i 
on Sunday. Febniary 27. 
Tickets for the Chindo 
Sikkim Kut performance 
the Asia Society are $16 for 
conference attendees and 
Members of the Ame i 
Museum and the AsiaSoi I 

and $20 for the general 
public 




Shaman Sook-Ja Chung 



Chindo Sikkim Kut: 
A Korean Shaman 
Ritual 

A group of shamans from 
Chindo Island will perform a 
southern Korean shaman 
ritual in the Asia Society 
Lila Acheson Wallace Audito- 
rium. Performances will I 
place on Friday. Febniary 2b 



Saturday, 
February 26 

A Korean Kosa 
Blessing: A Gathering 
of Cultures 
Hall of Ocean Life 
1:00 p.m. 

For the opening ceremony 
of the conference Shaman 
Ritual Practice. Perform- 
ance, and Metaphor, a Ko- 
rean shaman group from 
Chindo Island will execute a 
kosa ritual blessing on behalf 
of the households of the 
American Museum and the 
Asia Society. They are joined 
in this ceremonial opening by 
two other groups. Chief Leon 
Shenandoah of the Iroquois 
Confederacy and people from 
the Onondaga Nation will 
drum and chant a ceremonial 
greeting. Felipe Garcia Vil- 
lamil's Afro-Cuban group 
Emikeke will present an Afro- 
Cuban ceremonial ritual de- 
rived from the Yoruba to an 
orisha known as Yemaja 
(goddess of the sea), and Palo 
Mayumbe. a ritual of Congo 
origin This presentation will 

set the framework for the 
conference discussion. 

Panel Discussion. Con 
for a Shaman Ritual. Partici- 
pants in the opening cere- 
monies and scholars discus 
the role of the shame n In the 
ceremonial lives "1 Korea 

Cubans. Haitians, and Ni 
Americans. The panel d. cu 

slon will take place in the 
Kaulmann Theater at 2:45 



p.m. 



An Initiation Kut for 
a Korean Shaman 

This compelling d. 

fersan Intimate i"" 1 ' 
the process of becoinn i 

shaman Authm, 
rel Kendall, co -producer of 
,i„. film, will introduce ll ana 
lead a discussion aftei »he 
screening. The film, which Is 
35 mmiii^ long, will be 
shown at 4:30pm in the 
Kaufmann Theater. 



Sunday, 
February 27 

I i 00 a m Opening R i 
formance. 

II L5 a.m.-12:30 p.m, 

n u . i rementsoj <>'•'' '""< io 
Sikkim Kut Through 
demonstration and wid« o 

Theresa Ki j<> Kim ami m.-m 
I,,.,., ,.1 lhf Kwrvan shaman 

group will explain the symbol- 
,..,,, ,,f i he Korean kur or 
shaman ceremoi ij 

12:30-200 p.m. 
Lunch Video Program Sev- 
eral videos portray how i iei 
forming artists are Influenced 

by shamanicpi." " 

2 : 15 p in A Salp'uri 
Dance. Sun Ock Lee per- 
form- the Korean dance 
Sali' <"i a theatrical plei e 
infused with elements to 
shaman ntual. 

2:45 p-m. Panel DJ» US 
slon. Extensions and 
rheinflueni 
imanii practice on contem 

por 



Global Cultures in a Changing World 



Charles A. Dana Education Wing 



The Education Depart- 
ment offers public programs 
that celebrate diverse cultural 
groups and their traditions 
Lectures, films, demonstra- 
tions of music and dance, 
workshops, and perform- 
ances are featured. These 
programs will address cul- 
tural misconceptions and 
biases, relations between 
adults and youth in a chang- 
ing world, and the preserva- 
tion and change of cultural 

traditions. 

Special programs will be 

presented in conjunction with 
New York City events, includ- 
ing Black History Month. 



Festival of Korea. Women s 
History Month, and Asian/ 
Pacific American Heritage 
Month. 



i,„ ,, hr... hure listing ipi 
cific programs through May, 
lillltlll . Multicultural Outreach 
Office at (212) 769-5315. 



^ a ,.,<,«»«. ^^J^w c**> ta ow»i 







A New Accord 

and 45,000 acres of prime grassland 



Ranchers in Chihuahua. 
Mexico, have come to an 
extraordinary agreement with 
scientists at the Amencan 
Museum. Mexico s Institute 
de Ecologia, and the Califor- 
nia State University at 
Dominguez Hills that will 
preserve 45.000 acres of 
grassland for the protection 
of an endangered species of 
tortoise. The initiative will 
both save North America 
largest land turtle, the Bolson 
tortoise, from extinction and 
preserve one of the best re- 
maining tracts of Chihuahuan 

,nd in North 
America The Bolson tortoise 
shares this pristine habitat 
with golden eagles and 
, i mgars. and the reintroduc- 
Hi m of the pronghom ante- 
lope is under discussion. 

Human encroachment and 
habitat destruction threaten 
turtles and tortoises around 
the world with irreversible 
population declines and. In 
some cases, extinction. In 
L99] the Turtle Recovery 
Program, a project of the 
American Museum of Natural 
■ry's Center for Biodiver- 
>nd Conservation, identi 
fied 80 priont i.-. in the area 
llobal Untie conservation. 
The Bolson tortoise (Goph 
IS /lauomargmuh' 

oi the highest on the lisl 
"It is ran in conservation 
that one Is able to ensure the 
cies in a 

iys Mi. I.ael 
mens director of special 
projects at the Museum - 
Ccntei foi Biodiversity and 

Conservation. "It is gratifying 
lliat the Museum played such 
an integral role in bringing 
this project to its fruition." 

The combined pressures of 
human consumption, cattle 
grazing, habitat fragmenta- 
tion, and agricultural activities 
threaten the Bolson tortoise 
with imminent extinction. 
These large, burrowing tor- 
,, „,„ ... ( ,nce ranged through- 
out the grasslands of the 
Chihuahuan desei i from 
northern Mexico into the 
southwestern United States. 
Cuirentlv. it is estimated that 
fewer than 10.000 adult Bol- 
son tortoises remain in the 
wild, restricted to isolated 
areas of northern Mexico 

In 1992 a team of Mexu an 
and US scientists who were 
assembled and funded by the 
American Museum's Turtle 
Recovery Program, began an 
evaluation of the genetic 'lit 
ferentiation of the Bolson 
tortoise in different regions of 



Chihuahua. The scientists 
found that the most robust 
populations of this tortoise 
dwell on Rancho Sombrere- 
tillo. a large, privately owned 
cattle ranch. The Turtle 
Recovery Program commis- 
sioned a subsequent study to 
determine the feasibility and 
methods for protecting this 
area as a reserve dedicated to 
tortoise conservation. 

The survey of Rancho 
Sombreretillo revealed that it 
supports the best desert 
grassland in Chihuahua be- 
cause of its low-intensity cat 
tie grazing conducted for over 
a century under a single fam- 
ily ownership. The area 
provides forage for approxi- 
mately one third of the 
world's population of Bolson 
tortoises. The ranch is pro- 
tected by 80 kilometers of 
fencing, and its remote loca- 
tion and a small human popu- 
lation further enhance its 
suitability as a preserve 

The agreement to preserve 
the entire 45.000-acre Ran- 
cho Sombreretillo resulted 
from negotiations between 
the ranch's owners and the 
project's scientists to develop 
a structured program of tor- 
toise protection compatible 
with cattle ranching The 
cooperative plan which bal- 
ances the agricultural forage 
value of the land with its eco- 
logical importance, calls foi 
rotational grazing to minimize 
the impact of cattle upon 
young tortoises and to allow 
for the complete growth cycle 
of the grasslands during the 
July-to-September wet sea- 
son. The system will sen 
a model of grassland manage- 
ment that could ultimately 
rejuvenate some of the de- 
nuded land adjacent to Ran- 
cho Sombreretillo and areas 
of the southwestern United 

States. 

The final arrangement 
between the owners of the 
ranch, Mexico's lnstituto de 
Ecologia, the American Mu- 
seum, and Fundacion Chi- 
huahuense de la Fauna will 
provide the services of a part- 
time warden who will guard 
against poachers, continue 
access to the area for conser- 
vation biologists, and establish 
of an education and outreach 
program for the community 
Because poaching for human 
consumption is a major threat 
to the Bolson tortoise's sur- 
vival, the education program 
will promote awareness of the 
vulnerability of the species 
and its local importance as a 






Children's 

Preview 

of the New Hall 

of Early 

Mammals 



Children registenng for the 
Education Department work- 
shop From Bone to Stone 
will take a sneak peek at the 
soon-to-be-opened Hall of 
Early Mammals. 

The workshop, which is 



, . i.. e k „,n«land in Chihuahua, Mexico, is 

Much of the ° n ^ S h J^ZX cattle. The endangered 

^lon roSTbefoVNorth Americas ,ar 3 e s( 

,and .urtle .III /i"d refuge in a ne.lv crea.ed preserve. 




keystone species of the Chi- 
huahuan grasslands. 

"Successful Bolson tortoise 
conservation policies were 
developed in Mexico in the 
late 1970s and the hope was 
that new conservation pro- 
grams be developed." said 
Gustavo Aguirre. researcher 



at the lnstituto de Ecologia 
and fellow of the Mexican 
National Researchers System. 
The Sombreretillo program 
expands on the original pro- 
jects and it's a good example 
of successful international 
collaboration 

The Bolson tortoise reserve 



reflects the current environ- 
mental view that conservation 
efforts should focus on pre- 
serving entire ecosystems 
rather than a single species 
This plan will save not only 
the Bolson tortoise but also 
an ecosystem upon which 
many other creatures depend 






geared toward children in 
grades 3 and 4. will take 
place on Saturday, April 23, 
from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 
p.m. Participants will explore 
the past life on earth of early 
mammals and sculpt their 



own clay fossils under the 
direction of Angela Tripi- 
Weiss. art director at New 
York City Public School 87 

On Sunday, March 20. 
workshop participants will 
preview the new hall from 



10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Angela 
Tripi-Weiss will accompany 
children on the tour. 

Tickets for the preview 
workshop are $25 For regis- 
tration information call (21^1 
769-5310 



K 



Shark Surprise 

Members' Birthday Parties at the Museum 




Before there were 
dinosaurs, there were sharks. 
And before Jaws, there was 
the monster shark Carcharo- 
don megalodon, three times 
the size of the great white. In 
conjunction with the special 
exhibition Sharks.' Fact and 
Fantasy, the Membership 
Office is throwing a special 
birthday party devoted to 
these living fossils 



Young Members between 
the ages of 5 and 10 can 
invite their friends to a party- 
ing frenzy among some of 
their favorite sharks. They II 
learn what these amazing 
creatures like and don I like, 
how they swim, and how they 
use their superior senses. 
Crafts and shark-style games 
will add to the fun before the 
party-goers sink their jaws 



into ice cream and cake. 

In addition to the shark 
parties there are five other 
kinds of parties focusing on 
dinosaurs. African mammals, 
reptiles and amphibians, 
ocean dwellers, and Native 
Americans of the Great 
Plains. 

The parties are two hours 
long and held at 3:30 p. m 
on Wednesdays, at 4:00 p.m. 



on Fridays, and at 11:00 a.m. 

■ lOp.m i/eekends 

The group should be no 
fewer than 10 and no more 
than 20. The fee Is $275 plus 
$15 per child and covers all 
materials, juice, li > 
favor bags, and the servi 
of a Museum party < oordlna 
tor The coordinator will help 
you plan a party that suits 
your child's needs and tastes, 



Members 9 Preview of 
Sharks! Fact and Fantasy 

Thursday, February 3 

^e^V^o^foVa^P^ng and Higher Members 
Naturemax viewing: 7:30 p.m. 
$6, and open to all Members 



Myths and misconceptions 
are laid to rest in the new 
exhibition Sharks.' Fact and 
Fantasy. Members can pre- 
view the intriguing exhibition 
on Thursday, February 3, 
between 4:00 and 7.00 p.m. 
(The exhibition will open to 
the general public on Febru- 
ary 4.) Volunteer Highlights 
Tour guides will be on hand 
at the preview to offer addi- 
tional insights. No tickets are 



necessary; your valid mem- 
bership card is your ticket of 
admission. 

On the evening of the pre- 
view Members can enjoy a 
private viewing of the new 
Naturemax film Search for 
the Great Sharks. Noted 
shark authorities Eugenie 
Clark and Rodney Fox lead 
viewers on an oceanic expedi- 
tion from California to the 
remote reaches of Australia. 



Audiences observe some of 
the world's largest sharks at 
close range, including the 40 
foot whale shark, witness the 
birth of a baby shark, and 
follow a diver inside a trans- 
parent tube that's surrounded 
by sharks. 

The film will begin at 7:30 
p.m in the Naturemax The- 
ater. Tickets are $6; use the 
February Members' programs 
coupon on page 3 to registei 



Members' Family Event 

A Saturday 
with the 
Sharks 

Saturday, February 5 
9:00 a.m.-l :00 p.m. 
$10, and open only to 
Participating and 
Higher Members 

Sharks! Fact and Fan- 
tasy is full of absorbing 
details about shark biology 
and behavior (see the re- 
lated article on page 1) 
Members can spend Satur- 
day. February 5. among the 
sharks, starting with a pri- 
vate viewing of the new 
exhibition between 9:00 
and 10:00 am Volunteer 
Highlights Tour guides will 
lead mini-tours and answer 



questions. 

At 1030 a.m. participants 
can attend a screening of 
Sharks, a 60-minute film that 
combines science and adven- 
ture. They'll see researchers 
experimenting with the carti- 
lage of sharks in an attempt 
to find a treatment for cancer, 
footage of a live birth of 
lemon sharks, and the risky 
task of testing a new shark 
repellent in open water. 

After the film, stop by the 
special display in the theater 
lobby and take a look at some 
shark specimens from the 
Museum's collections. Norma 
Feinberg. senior scientific 
assistant in the Department of 
Herpetology and Ichthyology, 
will be on hand from 11:30 
a.m. to 2.00 p.m. to talk 
about the specimens and 
answer questions. Hems on 
display include jaws from 
great white and tiger sharks, 
alcohol-preserved specimens 
of a deep-water shark, the 



head of a mako shark, and 

othei 

Drop in any time between 
| i ;0 a.m. and 1 00 p.m. on 
acrafty workshop with lu 
Myles to explore the inc n 
ble variety of shark design. 
Some sharks are short and 
some are fat; others are 
skinny and some of them are 
flat They're gray, bl 
brown, spotted, and striped. 
One even wears a fringe on 
its head Participants will 
create and take home a 
model of their favorite 

species. 

In addition, families can go 
on a self-guided shark hunt. 
All hunters will receive a 
packet of shark facts that 
includes puzzles, games, and 
clues to help them lex 
sharks and shark artifacts 
around the Museum, and 
they'll be rewarded with a 
shark prize. 

Use the coupon on page b 
to regis; 



and on the dayol Ihi 
.i„. || handle everything irom 
, .null.-- to pari All 

i do is bring the 
indhelpes 

( hlld 

Shaik pat itobta 

only for the duration ol the 
t €ni; chibition h 

I ebruary through April For 
mor.' Information aboul the 
parties call (212) 769-5542. 



Members' Tours 

Sharks! 

Friday, March 4 

4:00, 5:00, 6:00, and 7.00 p.m. 
Free, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 



The new Gallery 3 exhil il 
tion offers a comprehensive 
vu'u ol links and shark be- 
havior, and Members can 
take guided tours of Sha> 
Fact and Fantasy to see how 
remarkably unique and di- 
se these animals are 

Volunteer Highlights Tour 
( luides will lead participants 
through a re-creation of an 
underwater habitat, complete 
with life size models thai dra 
matically illustrate the variety 
of body size and form among 
species. The guides will dis- 



,l ,l,.iil iin .i 
phology and beh.ivi. u as well 
■ „■ relationship between 

sharks an«l pcopl.- tin- role ..I 

sharks In myth and folklore, 
ommerclal and si lentlfli 
ol sharks, and .hark 

.mi,,, i and attack prevention 

The tours will also Lil 

at lb- t on display in the 

Museum s permanenl i ollei 

tions. 

The tours will last aboul I i 
min.ii. i thi i ebruary 
Members programs coupon 
on page 3 to regl 



Fascinating Fossils 

Friday, February 25 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater «.w— « 

Free for Members, $8 for non-Members 



John Maisey. curat-- 1 In 
Department of Vertebrate 
Paleontology and resident 
curator for Shar* ""' 

Fantasy, will explain the dil 
ference between "d 

other bony fishes and dis< 
i history of shark 
the Members' program/ 
noting Fossi 

Maisey will focus on three 
or four different hark 

species and Illustrate their 
Aon He'll talk about 
hov an use fo 



todetermin i • arii b ol an 
animal's chared- md 

behaviors Including II 
ing habits M 'ked 

extensively with fossil fisl 
from the San. ii. in. ' I ormation 
,1 Brazil, which da! 

from thi 

describe 
Ion of the fishes' stom 

ach contents can >gnif- 

Icant details ol aro lent 

lifest 
Use the coupon on page 3 

to registei 






Member-Get-a- 
Member 



What could be better than 
sharing the benefits and privi- 
leges of Participating mem- 
bership with friends and 
relatives? 

Use this form to recom- 
mend friends or relatives for 
Museum membership, and 
we'll send them information 
and an application. When 
someone you recommend for 
membership becomes a Par- 

iating Member of the 
Museum, we'll thank you with 
a $10 coupon to apply to- 
ward your next Participating 
membership renewal. Tl 
form must be used to qualify 
for the $10 coupon. 



Membership Services. American Museum of Natural 
History. Central Park West at 79th Street. New York. 
NY 10024-5192. 

These folks may be interested in Participating member- 
ship 



1 Name: 
Address: . 
City: 



State; 



.Zip:. 



2 Name: 
Address. _ 

City. 



State 



.Zip:. 



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Explore our N a turemax 
Dinner Theater Package 

See our latest features: 

Shark and 
To The Limit 

Includes a complete dinner entree, 
appetizer or dessert and coffee %C%~% 

per person — 1. 



00 



Hours 

Lunch, Mon.-Fri: 11:30-3:30 

Saturday ami Sunday Brunch: 11:00 - 4:00 
Dinner seating, Fri.- Sat: 5:00 - 7:30 

For Reservations call 212-769-5865 




[AMERICAN M U S E II U O f t. A T U R A I HlSTOB 




Ice Fishing 

at Blue Mountain Lodge in Peekskill, New York 

Saturday, February 12 
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
$60, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 




Love to fish? Love the cold 
weather? Try ice fishing! Join 
Friends of Fishes, curators 
from the Department of 
Ichthyology, and members of 
the Hudson River Foundation 
for a spectacular day of na- 
ture walks, ice fishing, and a 
gourmet catered lunch — in 
the lodge or on the lake, the 
choice is yours. 

Bring warm clothes, a love 
for the brisk outdoors, and a 
hearty appetite. Those who 
brave the ice can bring their 
catch back to where the less 
bold will be keeping warm, 
waiting comfortably in front 
of the lodge's big old-fash- 
ioned fireplace. Lunch will 



include fish, salads, side 
dishes, dessert, and coffee. 

Tickets are $60 per person 
and include lunch and round- 
trip bus transportation from 
the Museum to Blue Moun- 
tain Lodge. For further infor- 
mation call (212) 289-3605 
or fax (212) 360-6625. To 
register, make your check 
payable to the American Mu- 
seum of Natural History and 
mail with a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to Ice Fish- 
ing, Friends of Fishes, De- 
partment of Ichthyology. 
American Museum of Natural 
History, Central Park West at 
79th Street, New York, NY 
10024-5192. 



Family 
Mediterranean 

Discovery Cruise 



From June 30 to July 14. 
Discovery Cruises offers an in- 
depth look at ancient civiliza- 
tions of the Mediterranean, 
including sites in Italy, the 
Greek Isles, and Turkey. Ports 
of call include Venice, San- 
torini, Mykonos, Crete, 
Rhodes, Ephesus, Istanbul, 
Athens, and Olympia. Partici- 
pants will walk along narrow 
cobblestone lanes lined with 
pastel houses, visit castles 
and cathedrals, and explore 
ancient ruined cities and 
temples, museums and 
mosques. 

The program is designed 
especially for families and 



takes into consideration the 
diversity of interests and spe- 
cial needs of family travel. 
Hands-on activities and lec- 
ture programs for both chil- 
dren and adults will 
complement experiences 
among the natural wonders 
and fascinating cultures of this 
beautiful region. 

The cruise will be aboard 
the 174-cabin Daphne, and 
special rates are available to 
encourage families to travel 
together. For further informa- 
tion, call Discovery 
Cruises/Tours at (800) 462- 
8687 or in New York State. 
(212) 769-5700. 



Current Exhibitions 



Waura 

A selection of drawings by 
the Waura Indians of Brazil's 
Upper Xingu River region is 
on display in the Akeley 
Gallery. Geometric designs, 
anthropomorphic figures, and 
mythological or supernatural 
beings are among the draw- 
ings' themes, along with ani- 
mal images such as tapirs, 
monkeys, bats, and snakes. 
The exhibition will be on 
display through April 24. 

Librarian's Choice 

An exhibit of rarities from 
the Museum Library's exten- 
sive collections is on display 
in the Library Gallery. Librar- 
ian's Choice Treasures 
from 124 Years of Collect- 
ing features items from the 



Rare Book, Photographic, 
Film. Art, and Archives col- 
lections. The gallery is located 
on the fourth floor. 

The Barosaurus 

The world's tallest free- 
standing dinosaur exhibit, a 
five-story-high Barosaurus, is 
on display on the second 
floor of the Roosevelt Memo- 
rial Hall. 

The Museum houses the 
world's largest and most com- 
prehensive collection of fossil 
vertebrates, and work on a 
new exhibition area is under 
way on the fourth floor. The 
halls of Earth History. Late 
and Early Mammals, and Late 
and Early Dinosaurs are 
closed for renovations. The 
t.rsi of the new halls will open 
later this year. 



10 



lappenings at the Haydcn 






.ecture 

rentiers in Astronomy and Astrophysics 

Sn Tuesday. February 8. at 7:30 p.m.. Kenneth 
liqhell of Columbia University's Department of 
?ronomv will present an illustrated talk. The 
ormahon and Evolution of Dwarf Galax.es. The 
S> Way has nine companion dwarf galaxies that 
re examples of what is probably the most common 
woe of galaxy in the universe. Investigates of how 
hey formed and evolved offer clues to general 
Xy formation theory. Mighell will review the 
-urrent understanding of these dwarf galaxies and 
discuss plans for future research^ 

On Monday. March 14. at 7:30 p .m.. Date 
Cruikshank of the NASA Ames Research Center 
Xresent an illustrated talk. "The ley Edge of Our 
SoLS System: Pluto and Beyond. Cruikshank will 
discuss the latest research regarding Pluto and 
NASA s plans to visit the planet 

These lectures are part of the F™tnr**nA» 
tronomy and Astrophysics series Tickets are $6 
o° Participating and Higher Members and $8 for 
n°on Members. For information f ou^^avaj- 
ability and upcoming lectures call (212) 769 bVUU. 

Sky Show 

Orion Rendezvous...A Star Trek' 
Voyage of Discovery 

Climb aboard the starship Andres for a cos rnic 

journey Actor LeVar Burton joins the crew as Lieu 

enant Commander Geordi La Forge, the character 

he Plays on Star Trek: The Next Generat.on*. 

Showtimes: 130 and 3:30 p.m. 

Sa°t n "li n 00 a.m. (except for Feb A 5 and March 5) 

100 2 00. 3.00. 400. and 5:00 p.m. 

Sun i 00.' 200, 3:00. 4:00. and 5:00 p.m. 



Admission to the Sky Show for Participating and 
Hiuher Members is $6 for adults and $3.50 tor 
children ages 2 to 12. Prices and schedules sublet 
to change without notice For non-Memters P|> ■ 
and additional information, call (212) 769 biuu 



Exhibition 

Star Trek* Exhibition: 

A Retrospective of the Sixties 

Men costumes. Starfleet uniforms, Enterprise 
models, and assorted props and photos from 
Paramount'* original 1960s televisi. « series are 
on display in a special exhibition curated by the 
National Air and Space Museum Exp ore the 
historical, political, social, and cultural themes incor- 
porated into the Star Trek* series For information 
call (212) 769-5100. Through March 6. 

Children's Shows 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers. Children sing along with images o! 
Ser favorite Sesame Street Muppets as they learn 
about rainbows, the phases of the moon sunsete 
and stars. Sat.. Feb. 5. 10:30 a.m. and 11:45 am , 
and Sat.. March 5, at 10:30 a.m. Admission fo. 
Participating and Higher Members is $6 fo "adults 
and $3 50 for children Members can purchase up 
to four tickets at the Members price. 

Shows usually sell out in advance, reservations by 
mail only, are necessary. Make your check payab te 
The Hayden Planetarium (Attn: Wonderful Sky, 
Central Park West at 81st Street. New York, NY 
10024). indicate membership category and a first 
and second choice of showtimes. and include a self- 
addreSd, stamped envelope and V™**™ 
phone number. For additional information, call 
(212) 769-5900. 



Robots in Space features UcasfflmsWD2 and 

C-3PO and has been cr. P^J2*L 

dren rith a live host these 

farTouf space robots! Iren on a tour o t l„ 

universe. See how satellites and probes - 

fa? Journey from the ea.r er, ta ft - 

distant black holes. Sal March . andSat..Ma 
at 11:45 a.m Admission for Partlclpatog and 
gher Members is$4 f for adults and $2 for ch 
dren. For addlUonal information call (212) 7o9 
59DI' 



Courses for Stargazers 

The Planetarium offers a variety of courses f oi 
adults and famili. "tetj ri 

, .nalogof courses call (212) /b)$nn< 



Laser Shows 

journey into another dimension where'lase. viSU 

ak and rock mi IS mbine to create a dazzlin. 

SpZnce of sight and I Shous ™J™«$ 

on Fridays and Saturdays at 7 I'n - ' n • ■'"> muu 
pmFof prices and show schedule, telephone 

(212) 100. 



Us always a good idea to cail before visit 
ing the Planetarium, since prices. P'ofltams. 
and showtimes are subject to change ^.thout 
notice. For general Planetarium information, 
call (212) 769-5100. 



Museum Notes 

Hours 

IS?""" asssas 

IS: " :KK38K 

The Junior Si ,000 am -4 45 p.m. 

SaT&Sun 10:00 a.m.-5:45p.n, 

Th Tues UW F r Ub ' a ™ ll-00a.m.-4-.00pm 

Hon desk beginnmg a, 1 1 45 am Ages 5-10. 
Children musl be accompanied by an adult. 
Closed on holidays and u,ee ^^ 3Q 

Sat & bun 

The Natural Science Center ,„.„.- 

For children of all ages and their families. 
Closed on Mondays and »°^ am _ l2 . 30 pm 

Tues.-Fn & 2; 00-4:30 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun 100-4:30 p.m. 



Museum Dining 

D.ner Saurus Fas. Setvice Ea.ery^ ^^ ^ 

Daily 

Garden Cafe _ 

R , se ™abons, 212) 769-5865 m33Qpm 

Lunch. Mon-Fn 5 30-7:30 p.m. 

gSSSLlta." UOOam^OOpm 

Whale's Lair , ()0 _ 8 . p.m. 

Fn Noon-8-.OO pm 

the Roosevelt Memorial Hall) ^^ p ^ 

Sat. & bun 



En Du a rmTMuseun, hours uisi.ors can en.er .he 
huddingVough ,he 77,h S.ree. er Uran* -he 
parking lot entrance (81st btreeu. or 



sevelt Memorial Hall entrance (79th Street and 
Central Park West) Visitors ottend.ng pro- 
grams after hours can enter the^Mmg 
through the driveway entrance at 79th 
Street and Central Park West. 

"*T"TlMAX film Search for the Great Sharks 
,okes U ieu.ers on an incredibly exciting under- 
water cinematic experience. They II go on a 
round-the-glohe expedition to discover »mc 
he world's largest sharks and to observe them at 
close range. Blue sharks, whale sharks and the 
notorious" great white shark are pursuedfrom th 
coast of California to the remote reaches of 

southern and western Australia. 
S ° Dramatic sequences include as^tongude 
the seldom-seen 40-foot-long whale snark 'he 
birth of a baby shark, the annual blos^mmgofa 
coral reef, and a gripping see,, c °d" 

encased In a transparent tube. Is encircled by 

Sha Asof February 4. showtimes for Search for the 
rreat Sharks are 10:30 and U rt., 1:30 and 

TsOpm daily- To the Limit, an exploration of 
<hf adaptation of the human mind one i body to 
cond it ioning/orou f;1 u,, ; ng^yK ; '|^ ;m 

^p-^Z^a^^yl^Oand 7.30pj 
Wh for the Great Sharks is shown on a double 
mwithlo the Limit. Schedules andprgsare 
subject to change without notice. Call (212) 7o* 
5650 for further information. 

CnHdren $2 single fea,ure ; $3 double lea.ure 



(n di„,dua/ S and families. Tour, «* "^'^ 

Office For details, call (212) /o* osoo. 




Fish Diversity Workshop for Children 

TheFrlehdsofFlshei Elementary! w 

e?peZce\nU -I "; 

eed 

m&fiu Thl. program uses the extensive col- 

lect ion of preserved fishes nnlu P- ,,, 

, , u program are also d.Form 

„ «onca//MaxRosenbJ llrectorof 

educa at (212) 289-3605. 

Pa Th^Museum's parking lot Is located on I 
StJeetbel ntral Park West and Columbus 

AvTnl .HI ^r d ° V ^Z7a ^ 

come. rued basis; fc ;"' 

<I I fnr bases The lot is open from 9.30 an 

'n'L Sunday through Thursday and fr 

,,,.'„. | inlght on Friday and Saturday 

HerU Manhattan, located on, way} 

the mseum at 210 West 77th 
Broadway and Amsterdam), of fers parking 

discounts roM.-m» W* 

F day they receive a $2 dr "ffregu 

\l res and on Saturday and Sunday Memt, 

\oe a $3 discount ,1919)769 5606 

Call the Memb. rshlp I ' (212)7b9bOUO 

for information about alternative parking. 



11 



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and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



Vol. 19. No 3 March 1994 



Participating 
i 

fight 

)ut 

vith 

lie 
Neandertals 

rhursday, March 10 
1.00 p.m. 
Main Auditorium 
J 10 for Members, 
515 for non-Members 




The European and Near Eastern 
Neandertals are the best and longest 
known of the premodem humans, 
and theirs is a pnmary role in the 
study of modem human ongins. An- 
thropologist Erik Trinkaus believes 
that at least one variant of the Nean- 
dertal strain may have shared some ot 
Its genes with anatomically modern 
human beings and that some or all ol 
us today may be closer kin to Nean- 
dertals than most people realize. 



At A Nighl Out with the Neander- 
tals Trinkaus will review current im 
ages oMhe Neandertals. the history of 
ideas regarding their role in modern 

human origins, and their ancestor- 
descendant relationship to us He II 
focus on the current understanding of 
who the Neandertals were - in terms 
of appearance, capabilities, and be- 
havior - as reflected by their 
anatomy, robusticity. stress levels, 
demography, technology, and social 



behavior. Clues from both Neandertal 

fossils and their associate-' 

cal remains w.IUh. discussed ..nM 

Trinkaus will show slides this evi- 
dence along with images of the N. 
dertals through the past century 
Professor and chairman of the 
Department of Aniluopology an 

University of New Mexi< < >us 

has been a research associate of the 
University of Bordeaux since 19»o 
He is the author of The Shanidar 



Neanderti' (1983) which concerns 

. d. criptionoftl 
from Shanldai < ave Iraq HI 

' he N ™ ndert , a,$: 
Changing the Image of Mnnrnni 

which he co-wrote wall I 

tionary discoveries and debat. 

ffograms 

coupon on page 3 to register for 

program. 






Members' Tour 

Ecology of North America 

Friday, March i 18 

tl6 £d 22 SS to Participating and Higher Members 

Appropriate for ages 16 and up 



Join geologist Sidney 
HorensteinforatiiparounM 

North Amenca that will view 
some of the continent's major 
ecological systems in Hi«" 
natural and undisturbed set- 
tings. The tour will look at 
Museum dioramas and partic- 
ipants will leam how these 
regions were altered by 
human contact. 

I lotenstcin. who is the 
Museum's coordinator of 
environmental public pro- 
grams, will lead participants 
i h rough several of the Mu- 
seum's exhibition halls, in- 
cluding North American 
Forests. Mammals, and Birds 
He'll discuss regional vegeta- 
tion and climate and point out 
how geology is a factor in 

habit. r 

Use the coupon on page o 
to register, and please note 
that tickets are available only 
by mail and that the 3.00 
tour has been cancelled. 




Members' Adult-Child Workshop 

The 
Mouse 

in the 

Matzoh 

Factory 



The World of Animals 



Saturday, March 5 
11-30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. 

^E»8 for non-Members 
Appropriate for ages 5 through adult 




Sunday, March 20 
11:00 a.m., 
Sold Out; 
space may be 
available at 12:30 
and 2:00 p.m. 

$l6pe rcou P ,e 
Appropriate 

for ages 5-8 




The mouse is back 1 This 
month he'll make his fifth 
annual appearance at the 
Museum for a special 
Passover program of songs, 
laughter, and matzoh making. 
Author Francine Medoff will 
read her story The Mouse in 
the Matzoh Factory, and 
then each child will help her 
mix the dough for matzoh 
Participants will take the 
dough home with them to 
bake in their own kitchens. 
A former nursery school 
teacher, Medoff is a working 
artist and a part-time admims 
trator at the Hebrew School 
of Temple Beth Israel in Port 
Washington, New York The 
program lasts approximately 
45 minutes and is appropriate 
for children between the ages 
of 5 and 8. Please note that 
all attendees must have tick- 
ets, which are available only 
by mail. Members are limited 
to two tickets per request for 
this popular show; use the 
coupon on page 5 to register. 



Invitation to Geology: 
A Beginners' Guide 

Tuesday, March 22, and Thursday, March 24 

7:00 p.m. 

gffihSSSW for non-Members 



Members will see a live 5- 
foot-long iguana in the Kauf- 
mann Theater and leam how 
wild iguanas are helping to 
restore the rain forests in 
Colombia and Costa Rica. 
Naturalist Bill Robinson will 
bring some of his wild friends 
to the Museum to discuss 
their roles in nature and offer 
live demonstrations of their 
adaptations for survival. 

Robinson will explain some 
of the many ways in which 
animals trick each other to 
avoid being eaten or to scare 
up a meal A brush-tailed 
porcupine will rub its quills 
together to make a cobra-like 
sound that frightens away 
predators. Another guest, a 
110-pound alligator snapping 
turtle, disguises its tongue as 
a wriggling worm that lures 
unsuspecting fish right down 

itsthroat. 

Among the other animals 
appearing at the show will be 
a 3-foot-long African pouch 
rat, African eagles that will fly 
around the room, and an 
niormous python. 

Robinson, who presents his 
dramatic wildlife programs to 
thousands of schoolchildren 
each year, has appeared at 
the Museum for the past 14 
years. Please note that all 
attendees, adults and children 
alike, must have tickets. Use 
the March Members' pro- 
grams coupon on page 3 to 
register 



Geologist Sidney Horen- 
stein will present a two-part 
lecture series on our dynamic 
planet that introduces the 
basic aspects of geology. By 
studying the record of past 
changes written upon the face 
of the earth, we can not only 
see the geologic past but also 
infer what the future may 

hold. n . . 

The lectures will investigate 
the movement of continents, 
volcanic activity, and earth- 
quakes. In addition to their 
disastrous effects, earthquakes 
are a continuous source of 
data for analysts of the earth s 



interior. Horenstein will de- 
scribe these and other natural 
processes such as the weanny 
down of mountains, the ele- 
vation of continents, and the 
melting of rocks. Long before 
the phenomena of drifting 
continents and interacting 
plates were recognized, geol- 
ogists were aware of the con- 
tinuous creation, alteration, 
and degradation of rocks. 
Participants will leam about 
current ideas of how life ongi- 
nated and our place in the 

universe. „ 

Use the coupon on page J 

to register. 




ISSN 0194-6110 

Vol. 19. No. 3 
March 1994 

SheTG^be" -Manager of Me^ersMp Services 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Yolanda Loften — Fulfillment Coordinator 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and Higher 
Members of the American Museum of Natural Htf ory. is ^ 
published monthly September through J^^^ne. 
August. Publication offices are at Natural His tor, magaz ^ 
American Museum of Natural History Central JPa rk Wes 
Street. New York. NY 10024-51%. Telephone (21^ 
5606. Subscriptions: $50 a year for Part.c.pa »ng Mem 
$100 a year for Contributor Membership. © 1 W «" N(?vV 
Museum of Natural History. Second-class postage ; pa d 
York, NY Postmaster Please send address <* an j^'S atura | 
Rotunda. Membership Office, American Museum otiNa 
History. Central Park West at 79th Street, New York. 
10024-5192 



Printed by Waldon Press. Inc.. New York 




The Andean Achievement 

Friday, April 15 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufrnann Theater 

Free for Members, $8 for non-Members 

Sixteenth-century Euro- 
peans encountered a thriving 
series of cultures in the cen- 
tral Andes Inca achievements 
range from the humble 
potato, a crop that would 
become a worldwide staple, 
to a sprawling, 15,500-mile 
system of roadways. They 
produced magnificent woven 
cloth, elaborate ceramics and 
metalwork, monumental 
buildings, and early empires 
rivaling those of the Old 
World in size and scope. 

Craig Morris will talk with 
Members about his archeo- 
logical fieldwork in Peru and 
the region's stunning array of 
ancient arts and technology. 
The Department of Anthro- 
pology's curator of South 
American archeology, Morris 
has conducted field studies in 
Peru for more than 20 years. 
His best known work has 
been in the Museum's exten- 
sive excavations at the Inca 
administrative center of 
Huanuco Pampa, located in 
the central highlands, and the 
southern coastal region of 
Chincha. 

The Andean Achievement 
will focus on metallurgy, tex- 
tiles, and architecture Inca 
metallurgists employed tech- 
niques unknown in sixteenth- 
century Europe, using 
sophisticated methods for 
smelting, casting, joining, and 
gilding metals. Foremost 
among the region's arts are 




Peruvian cotton tapestry 



its textiles, unparalleled in 
their technical virtuosity Bril- 
liantly colored cloth, with 
elaborate designs executed in 
finely spun and tightly woven 
threads, was produced on a 
scale remarkable for preindus- 
trial times. Morris will also 
discuss how archeological 
information from Chincha 
and Huanuco suggests ideas 
about the economic and polit- 
ical workings of the region. 
He'll illustrate the lecture with 
slides from the Hall of South 
American Peoples, which 
houses the largest collection 
of Andean objects of any 
museum in the United States. 
This program is presented 



in conjunction with the publi- 
cation of The Inka Empire 
and Its Andean Origins. 
which Morris co-wrote with 
Adriana von Hagen. A fasci- 
nating illustrated history of 
the Inca and their predeces- 
sors, this story of the Andean 
people traces the develop- 
ment of their civilization from 
its beginnings some 11,000 
years ago to its culmination in 
the sixteenth century. The 
book will be available for 
purchase at the program, and 
Morris will sign copies after 
the lecture. 

Use the March Members' 
programs coupon at right to 
register for the program. 



Behind-the-Scenes Tours of the 



Department of Mineral Sciences 

Wednesday, April 6, and Saturday, April 9 

$12, and open only to Participating and Higher Members 

Appropriate for ages 13 and up 



From humble chunks of 
local rocks to diamonds from 
South African mines and 
meteorites that landed in 
distant reaches of Antarctica, 
the Department of Mineral 
Sciences manages extensive 
collections. Samples of these 
minerals, gems, rocks, and 
meteorites are studied in 
search of clues to the history 
of the earth and other plane- 
tary bodies. 

The collections are actively 
developed and used for de- 
partmental research, and next 
month Members can take a 
look behind the scenes in 
Mineral Sciences. They'll visit 
collection areas and labs that 
are never open to the general 
public to hear about ongoing 
research projects that are 
conducted around the world. 
Scientists from the depart- 
ment will be on hand to de- 
scribe their work and display 
specimens they've collected in 
the field. 

The tours last about one 
hour. Use the coupon at righl 
to register, and please note 
that tickets are available only 
by mail. 



, -, 

Behind-the-Scenes Tours of the Department of 
Mineral Sciences. $12, and open only to Participating 
and Higher Members. Tours will leave at 15-minute inter- 
vals and last about an hour. We will send you confirm., 
tion by mail indicating the exact time your tour will st u I 
Please indicate a first, second, and third choice. 
Wednesday. April 6, between 5:00 and 5:45 p.m 

_ Wednesday. April 6. between 6:30 and 7:30 p.m. 

_ Saturday, April 9, between 10.30 and noon 

Saturday, April 9. between 115 and 2:30 p.m. 

Number of tickets at $12: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 



Name:. 



Address: 
City: 



.State: 



.Zip:. 



Daytime telephone:. 



Membership category: 

Please make check payable to the American Museum of 
Natural History and mail with a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to Behind the Scenes, 
Membership Office, American Museum of NatU 
I listory, Central Park West at 79th Street. New York NY 
10024-5192. 



March Members' 
Programs Coupon 



Name: 



Address: 
City: 



State 



.Zip: 



I >i* lime telephone: 



Membership category:. 



Total amount enclosed;. 



Please make check (II applicable) payable to the American 
Museum of Natural History and m.nl with a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope to March Mem 
Programs, Membership Oftur American Musmim of 
Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Streel Now 
York. NY 10024 5192 Telephone reservations are not 
accepted. No refunds or exchanges. 

Unless otherwise indicated, no more than eight 
tickets may be ordered for a program. Participat- 
ing Members are entitled to four tickets per 
program at the Members' price. Higher Members 
are entitled to six tickets, and Associate Members 
are entitled to one ticket. 

Members' Tours of Sharks! I rlday, March 4 
Please indicate a first and second choice. 

5:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 

Number of free Members' tickets 

(no more than 2, please): 

The World of Animals. Saturday, March 5. 
Please indicate a first and second choice. 

11:30 a.m. 1.30 p.m 

Number of Members' tickets at $5: 

Number of additional tickets at $8: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

A Night Out with the Neandertals 

Thursday. March 10. 7-00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $10: 

Number of additional tickets at $15:. 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Artistic Expression in an Amazonian Culture 
Friday, March 11,7 00 p m 

Number of Members' tickets at $7: 

Number of additional tickets at $10: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Invitation to Geology 

Tuesday. March 22, and Thursday. March 24. 7:00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $12: 

Number of additional tickets at $20: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

The Samaritans and Jews of India 
Wednesday, March 30, 7 00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $7: 

Number of additional tickets at $10: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

The Andean Achievement. Friday. April 15, 7 00 p.m 
Number of free Members' tickets 

(no more than 2. please): 

Numbo of additional Member i $5: 

Number of non-Mo nl M'r, tickets al $S: 

Total amount ok Ic^.'i I i"i program 

Rediscovery of the World: An Evening with 
Jean-Michel Cousteau. Monday. April 18. 7 00 p.m. 

Number of Members Hi kets at $20: 

Number of additional tickets at $25: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Historic Look at Building Stones (lecture) 
Thursday. April 21.7 00 p.m 

Number of Mo ill. il $6: 

Number of additional tickets at $9: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

When Worlds Collide. Saturday, April 30. 3:00 p.m 

Number of Mi il $6: 

iter of addiii- inal tli kets al $8 
Total amour rogram 

NOTE: Orders received less than ten days before 
show dates will be held for pick-up at the door on 
the day of the program if tickets are still available. If 
an event is sold out. you will be advised in writing or 
by phone and your check will be returned. 









A Historic Look 
at Building Stones 



Thursday, April 21 
7:00 p.m. 
Kaufmann Theater 
$6 for Members, 
$9 for non-Members 



Geologist Sidney Horen- 
stein will offer a slide-Illus- 
trated look at the use of 
huiUmq stones from their first 
recorded usages — by Egyp- 
tians. Romans, Inca. and 
others — to the present. He'll 
discuss quarrying methods 
and the tools used for shaping 
and decoration. Most areas 
offer a variety of stone, and 
Horenstein will examine how 
the properties of available 

ml In. -need architectural 

styli 

I [i irenstein, who is also the 
Museum's coordinator of 
environmeni.il publii pro- 

vill lead walking tours 
, injunction with this lec- 
ture. See the feature below 
for details about thetOUTS 
,ind please n individu- 

als registering foi this lecture 
will leceive preference when 
foi the April 27 
walking tour. Use the Man h 
Members' programs coup' il I 
on page 3 to registi 




Strata of Tilgate Forest 



Members' Walking Tour 

Building Stones of Manhattan 

Wednesday, April 27 

3:00, 4:30, and 6:00 p.m. 

$16, and open only to Participating and Higher Members 

Appropriate for ages 1 6 and up 





New York City has plenty 
of everything, especially build- 
ings. Sidney Horenstein. the 
Museum's coordinator of 
public programs, will lead 
Members on a walking tour 
that will inspect some of the 
city's tremendous variety of 
building stones Participants 
will learn to identify a variety 
of rock materials along with 
their geologic history and 
problems associated with 
their improper use or mainte- 
nance. 

This tour is presented in 
conjunction with the Mem- 
bers' program A Historic 
Look at Building Stones. 
Please note that people regis- 
tering for the lecture on April 
21 will receive first considera- 
tion for the limited number of 
places on this tour. Tickets 
are available only by mail use 
the coupon on page 5 to 
register 



When Worlds Collide 

Saturday, April 30 

3:00 p.m., Kaufmann Theater 

$6 for Members, $8 for non-Members 



Bellus, a wandering star 1 2 
times the size of our planet, is 
on a collision course with the 
earth. There is still time, 
though, to build a rocket on 
which a lucky few can escape 
to Zyra, a satellite of Bellus. 

The ultimate disaster 
movie. When Worlds Collide 
features a catalog of calami- 
ties — fires, floods, volcanic 
eruptions, exploding power 
plants, and most spectacular 
of all, a tidal wave that 
crashes through Times 
Square. The 1951 George 
Pal production won an Oscar 



for its breathtaking special 
effects and stands as a mile- 
stone in science-fiction film 
history. 

Brian Sullivan, the Hayden 
Planetarium's production 
designer, will host a screening 
of When Worlds Collide 
He'll introduce the film with a 
30-minute slide show that 
focuses on the film's special 
effects and other production 
features that make it a cine- 
matic landmark. 

The film is 81 minutes 
long. Use the coupon on 
page 3 to register. 







Special-effects technicians prepare the space ark 



Members 9 Cruise 

on Long Island Sound 

Saturday, May 7, Noon-4:00 p.m. 

$50 for Members, $60 for non-Members 



Spend a spring afternoon 
speeding along Long Island 
Sound on this Members' 
cruise. Participants will travel 
up the East River, through 
Hell Gate, and beneath the 
Throgs Neck Bridge into the 
sound They'll view both the 
New York and Connecticut 
shorelines on the way to New 
Haven Harbor and back. 

Sidney Horenstein, the 
Museum's coordinator of 



environmental public pro- 
grams, will host the cruise and 
point out landmarks along the 
way He'll discuss the origins 
of the sound, the geology of 
the shorelines, and the history 
of some of the towns. 

Bring a bag lunch; refresh- 
ments are available on board 
Use the coupon on page 5 to 
register, and please note that 
tickets are available only by 
mail. 



Adult-Child Workshop 



Catching the Wind 

Sunday, April 10 

10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. 

$26 per couple, and open only to 

Participating and Higher Members 

Appropriate for ages 5 and up 



Winds go their own ways. 
Old Boreas blusters down 
from the north, and Eurus 
waves in sheets of cold from 
the east. Notus is deceitful; it 
blows in warm from the south 
and then tears up trees and 
beats the shore with them. 
Zephyr, the west wind, is 
warm and gentle. 

To catch the wind one 
must think of things to amuse 
it and pique its interest — 
pinwheels, flapping flags, 
fluttering feathers, and tinkly 



things that make music Join 
June Myles at an experimen- 
tal workshop for making toys 
and machines to lure the 
wind. We'll make fanciful 
wind machines to indicate the 
direction of the wind or 
. I nines to harness its musical 
side or a combination of the 
two. Afterward you can catch 
the wind and watch it breathe 
life into your creations. 

Use the coupon on page o 
to register, tickets are avail- 
able only by mail. 



Artistic Expression 

in an Amazonian Culture 

Friday, March 1 1 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$7 for Members, $10 for non-Members 



Drawings of supernatural 
beings and geometric motifs 
inspired by designs in nature 
are in the Akeley Gallery 
exhibition Waurd. These 
drawings were made by the 
Wauja (Waura) of Brazil's 
Alto-Xingu region, who are 
also known for their zoomor- 
phic pottery. 

Anthropologist Emilienne 
Ireland will present the Mem- 



bers' program Artistic Ex- 
pression in an Amazonian 
Culture, a discussion of artis- 
tic creativity in everyday life 
among the Wauja. a Native 
Amazonian people. The rela- 
tionship of the drawings to 
other forms of artistic expres- 
sion, such as ceremonial the- 
ater, oratory, dance, and 
song, will be discussed, as 
well as the role of individual 



self-expression in a small and 
tightly knit traditional commu- 
nity. During the past decade 
Ireland has resided for nearly 
two years among the Wauja, 
whose language she speaks. 
She is currently completing 
her doctoral thesis at Yale 
University on Wauja political 
organization. 

Use the coupon on page 3 
to register 




Turtles, drawn with an orange wax crayon 



The Samaritans 
and Jews of India 

Wednesday, March 30, 7:00 p.m. 

Main Auditorium, $7 for Members, $10 for non-Members 



Filmmaker Johanna Spec- 
tor will introduce and com- 
ment on her documentaries 
The Samaritans and Jews of 
India. These intriguing films 
about dwindling Jewish com- 
munities offer a look at van- 
ishing ways of life. 

The rituals and lifestyles of 
a Middle Eastern population 
that separated from the Jew- 
ish mainstream more than 
2,500 years ago are the focus 
of The Samaritans. Consid- 
ering themselves Hebrews 
rather than Jews, the Samari- 
tans' practices and rites are 
derived solely from the 
Samaritan Pentateuch. Their 
observances are not influ- 
enced by Judaic interpreta- 
tion based on other biblical 
and rabbinical writings and 
offer a fascinating contrast to 
those of modern Judaism, 
since the Samaritans observe 
the Sabbath, holidays, and 
festivals much as they were 
observed 2,000 years ago. 
The film is a remarkable 
ethnographic record of a little- 
known people who once 
numbered in the hundreds of 
thousands and lived through- 
out the Levant and Egypt. 
Now they dwell only in two 



small enclaves — one in the 
city of Holon. Israel, the other 
in the city of Nablus, on the 
West Bank of the Jordan — 
and these communities num- 
bered fewer than 450 individ- 
uals at the time of the filming 
The 1971 film is 30 minutes. 

About the Jews of India: 
Shanwar Telis or Bene Israel 
portrays the Jewish commu- 
nity of Bombay, which num- 
bered only 6,000 (about 
one-quarter of its original size) 
when the film was finished in 
1978. Most of these Indian 
Jews migrated to Israel, and 
their motivation to do so was 
on religious grounds rather 
than an avoidance of persecu- 
tion. The tolerance with 
which Jews have been treated 
in India distinguishes them 
from all other diaspora com- 
munities. 

The Jews of this region 
liveH in small enclaves in the 
villages around Bombay, spe- 
cializing as producers and 
sellers of til (sesame) and 
coconut oil. Their Marathi 
name, Shanwar Telis (Satur- 
day oil pressers). indicates 
that they refrained from sell- 
ing oil on the Sabbath. In 
addition to keeping the Sab- 



bath, this group maintained 
only a bare minimum of reli- 
gious observance until the 
1800s, when British rule 
brought prosperity to Bom- 
bay and many of the Shanwar 
Telis moved to the city. There 
they encountered for the first 
time Jews from other com- 
munities, from whom they 
learned Sephardic Jewish 
ritual and under whose influ- 
ence their lives came to re- 
semble those of other 
diaspora communities they 
built synagogues, translated 
religious texts into local di- 
alects, and started religious 
schools and other communal 
institutions. The film is 40 
minutes long. 

Anthropologist Johanna 
Spector. who is a music eth- 
nologist as well as a 
filmmaker and director, will 
introduce the films and an- 
swer questions from the audi- 
ence afterward. Spector s film 
2.000 Years of Freedom 
and Honor The Cochin 
Jews of India premiered at 
the Museum in 1992. as did 
her documentary Jews of 
Yemen in 1986. 

Use the coupon on page 3 
to register for the program. 



Rediscovery 
of the World 

An Evening 

with Jean-Michel Cousteau 

Monday, April 18 

7:00 p.m. 

Main Auditorium 

$20 for Members, $25 for non-Members 



Jean-Michel Cousteau, 
founder of the Cousteau Soci- 
ety, shares his vast experience 
as an environmentalist, diver, 
and director of expedite n 
the Members program Kedis- 
couery of the World 

Son of the legendary ex- 
plorer Jacques Yves O usteau 
Jean-Michel combines charm, 
wit, and expertise in his exam 
ination of the relationship 
between humans and the 
ocean environment He'll 
point out the systematic me- 
chanical destruction of ocean 
resources that has taken place 
over the past century and 
optimistically declare the 
1990s the decade of soli i 
tions." 

Striving to instill in others a 
committed desire to protect 
and preserve the environm. nl 
Jean-Michel uses breathtaking 
film footage to illustrate the 
possibilities ol reversing the 
detrimental effect "I th< 
In so doing, he'll create an 
unforgettable experience. 
1 Ins pr< lOi.im is presented 

in conjunction with the Gallery 

3 exhibition Sharks! Fat t and 



Fantasv. and the presentation 
vnll in. Iud< fas mating ac- 
counts of shark behavior To 
register, use the coupon on 
page 3 




The Alcyone 



Membership Workshops and Tours. Use this coupon to 
register for the Members' Tour of Yaohan Plozo and Long 
Island Sound Cruis< Indicate a flrel indsecondch 
times for Mouse \n the Matzoh Factory. Ecology of North 
America, Japanese Cuisine. Building Stones of 
Manhattan, and Catch the Wind. 



Name(s)of program!) 



Number of tickets and price (please indicate which program 
if more than one): __ _ ■ 



Total amount enclosed:. 



Name: 



Address: 

City: 



State 






Daytime telephone. 



Membership category: ■ 

Please make check payable to the Amerli an Museum of 
and mail with B self-addressed, stamped 
envelope to Workshops and Tours. Memb «fic« 

American Museum of Natural I I ' " k West at 

79th York. NY 10024-51 






John Burroughs Programs 



John Burroughs 
(1837 -1921) was a leading 
literary critic and a pioneer in 
the new school of nature 
ing. The John Burroughs 
iation.Inc, iounded 
and headquartered at the 
American Museum, presents 
programs and talks to pre 
serve places associated with 
Burroughs life It also main- 
tains Slabsides. the rustic 
cabin where he studied nature 
and wrote some of the essays 
that made him the foremost 
American nature writer of his 

time. 

For more information 
about these programs, call 
(212) 769-5169. 

Annual Meeting and 
Award Ceremony 

The John Burroughs Asso- 
ciation's annual meeting will 
take place on Monday. April 
4 from 10:30 to 11.30 a.m. 
in the Leonhardt People Cen- 
tei The meeting is free and 
will be followed by the annual 




Field Class inBh-d 
ID in Central Park 

Tuesdays. 7:00-9:00 am. 



John Burroughs fishing in Esopus Creek 



book award ceremony and 
lunch, which will take place 
from noon to 2.00 p.m. in 
the Audubon Gallery Tickets 
for the lunch are $30 each 
The association will an- 
nounce the results of its dis- 
tinguished sixty-eighth annual 
competition for outstanding 
nature writing, the fifth an- 
nual competition for 
outstanding natural history 
books for children, and the 
first annual award for an out- 
standing published natural 
history essay 



Slabsides Day 

Join the friends of the John 
Burroughs Association on 
Saturday, May 21. for a pro- 
gram at Slabsides. The open 
house, which will feature talks 
and nature walks in the sanc- 
tuary, will take place at noon. 
Admission is free. 

Built in 1895, Slabsides was 
designated a national histonc 
landmark in 1968. It is located 

in West Park. New York, 80 
miles north of New York and 
10 miles south of Kingston. 



Thursdays 9:00-11:00 a.m. 

April 7, 14 21. and 28 
May 5, 12, 19, and 26 
June 2 



Join naturalists Stephen C 
Quinn (on Tuesdays) and 
Harold Feinberg (on Thurs- 
days) in observing the spnng 
migration of birds through 
Central Park. Participants will 
learn how to identify species 
according to their field marks, 
habitat, behavior, and song. 
The fee for the program is 



$5. to be paid to the instruc- 
tor each morning before the 
walk starts. There is no pre- 
registration. Classes meet 
across from the Museum on 
the northeast comer of Cen- 
tral Park West and 77th 

Street. 

For further information call 

(212)769-5310. 



Lectures, Field Trips, and Workshops 



The following programs are 
presented by the Education 
Department; all but those 
with limited enrollment are 
available to Members at a 
ount. Use the coupon at 

right to register, and for fur- 
ther information call (212) 
769 i '10 



Biodiversity and 
Conservation 



April 19-May 17 
i ut) -8:30 pm. 

,,r Members. 
$40 for non-Members 

fhe American Museum 5 
Cental foi Biodiversity and 
Conservation is sponsoring a 
series of five lectures on the 
biodiversity crisis The 
will review patterns ol biologi- 
cal evolution and extinction 
across geological time ami 
show how changing pattei I is 
,,i human culture haveal 
fected other species and their 
habitats They'll discuss 
causes of the current crisis, 
offer solutions, and examine 
the reasons that saving the 
world's species is the most 

[ng challenge of our 
generatu n i 

April L9 Hie History of 
Q iv , nd I vim, tlon 

I Eldredge. curator in the 
Department of Invert i 

Hie Changing 
Role of Humans in Nature. 

Di I Mi.-dge. 
May 3-. The Biodfuerslty 
nd lis Causes Joel L 
Cracralt. curator In the De- 
partment of Ornithology and 

lor of th> 
for Biodiversity and Con 
vation. 
M t n L2 "" Biodfw ratty 
sis and Its Solutions Dt 

Cracraft. 

May 17: WhyBlodl 
Is \mportani I In 
and Saving the World's 



Species. Michael J. Novacek. 
vice president and dean of 
science. 

Evolution Follies: 
A Darwinian 
Entertainment 

Richard Milner, an anthro- 
pologist, historian of science, 
lyricist, and senior editor of 
Natural History magazine, 
mixes little-known anecdotes 
about Victorian scientists with 
creative songs about Darwin. 
Huxley, and evolution. The 

hidden agenda" of the Bea- 
gle's ship captain, the role of 
Sioux Indians in the gathering 
of dinosaur bones, and other 
l„M,n.»nng stories will be told. 

Thursday. April 7. 
7:00-8:30 p.m. $13.50 for 
Members, $15 for non- 
Members 



Tropical Rain Forest 
Conservation in 
Madagascar: The 
Making of a 
National Park 

Pamela C.Wright, associ- 
ate professor in the Anthro- 
pology Department at SL'NY 
Stony Brook, will present a 
slide illustrated program about 
hei involvement in establish 
ing the Ranomafana Park in 
Madagascar. Thursday. 
March 3. 700-830 pm 
J 50 for Members, $15 
■ non Members. 

Mustang: 

The Opening of a 

Forbidden Himalayan 

Kingdom 



Edwin Bernbaum. moun- 
taineer and scholar, relates 
of his recent joui 
a formerly closed 

kingdom Monday. March 7. 
i)-S.30pm. $13 50 for 
iibers. $15 for non- 
Mii 



Volcanoes: Their 
Eruptions and 
Emanations 

Volcanic eruptions are 
spectacular, vivid actions of 
our dynamic earth. Sidney 
Horenstein, coordinator of 
environmental public pro- 
grams, will use slides and 
videotapes to explain why 
eruptions occur He'll also 
discuss the variety, origin, and 
distribution of volcanoes and 
their effect on the history of 
life and the evolution of 
earth's atmosphere Mon- 
days. March 7 and 14. 
7 00-830 p.m. $22.50 for 
Members, $25 for non- 
Members. 

Animal Drawing 

Stephen C. Quinn, natural- 
ist and assistant manager in 
the Exhibition Department, 
discusses drawing technique, 
animal anatomy, and the role 
of the artist at the Museum 
Eight Tuesdays. March 
1 -April 19. 7:00-900 p.m. 
$105 (no discount for 
Members) Materials not 
included, limited to 25. 

Spring Flowers and 
Trees in Central Park 

Participants on a two-hour 
morning walk in Central Park 
observe botanical signs of 
spring They'll learn about 
plant identification and ecol- 
ogy from William Schiller, 
lecturer in botany for the 
Education Department Sat- 
urdays, April 23 or 30. or 
Wednesday. May 4. 
900-1 1 00 am $15 per 
walk (no discount for Mem- 
bers) I imtted to 25 people. 



biology at Saint Anselm Col- 
lege, leads an exciting two- 
day bus trip to wooded areas 
near New York City, includ- 
ing the Pine Barrens of New 
Jersey and Brigantine Na- 
tional Wildlife Refuge. Satur- 
day and Sunday, May 14 
and 15. $175 (double occu- 
pancy, no discount for Mem- 
bers). Limited to 36. 

Weekend Whale 
Watch off Cape Cod 

Three 4-hour whale-watch- 



ing excursions will cruise the 
rich feeding grounds off Stell- 
wagen Bank, where several 
species of whales are com- 
monly seen at close range. 
Museum staff members Brad 
Bumham. senior instructor in 
natural science in the Educa- 
tion Department, and natural- 
ist Stephen C. Quinn 
accompany the group. Fri- 
day-Sunday. May 20-22. 
$400 (double occupancy, no 
discount for Members). Lim- 
ited to 45 adults. 



Lecture Series 

I enclose a stamped, self-addressed en velope together with a 
check (or money order) payable to the American Museum of 
Natural History for: 

Advance registration is requested, but registration will be ^ac- 
cepted on the opening night if the course is not fitted (please 
call in advance). Registration will be delayed if daytime tele- 
! phone number and stamped. ^^^^^S^ 
'■ included. For further information call (212) 769-5310. Please 

! print. 



Course 



No. tickets 



Price/ticket Total 



! Course 



No. tickets 



Course 



No. tickets 



Price/ticket Total 



Price/ticket Total 



1 Course 



No. tickets 



Price/ticket Total 



Name:, 



i Address: 
i 

! City. _ 



_State: 



.Zip:. 



Weekend for Bird 
Enthusiasts 

Jay Pitocchelli, research 
ass< the Ornithology 

>r of 



Daytime telephone: " 

Please make check payable to the American Museum of 
Natural History and mail with a stamped, self-addressed 
envelope to: Lecture Series. Education Department, 
American Museum of Natural History. Central Park West 
at 79th Street. New York, NY 10024-5192. 



obal Cultures 

a Changing World 

irles A. Dana Education Wing 



Sharks! Fact and Fantasy 



he Education Department 
;rs public programs that 
»brate diverse cultural 
'ups and their traditions. 
;tures. films, demonstra- 
ns of music and dance, 
irkshops, and perform- 
ces are featured. This 



month's programs are pre- 
sented in conjunction with 
Women's History Month 

For a brochure listing spe- 
cific programs through May. 
call the Multicultural Outreach 
Office at (212) 769-5315. 



«o„ WaO-c. Fund .1 Ih. New Y °* ^"^J^, J iwd and M *v Rudm Founds. 
^ Hou*. ■»« VW. Found**. %£%£££££».. I H 3^ Helen R Sen™, 
.an, Randolph H..* Found***. "^^ Foundallon . fc Manna**. Bank 

and th« family ol Frederick H Uonhardt 



These programs are pre- 
sented in conjunction with the 
current Gallery 3 exhibition. 
To order tickets, send your 
check or money order 
payable to the American Mu- 
seum with a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope to: Shark 
Programs, Department of 
Education. American Museum 
of Natural History. 79th 
Street and Central Park West. 

New York. NY 10024-5192. 

Be sure to indicate which 
program and the number of 
tickets desired, and please 
include your daytime tele- 
phone number. For additional 
information, call the Educa- 
tion Department at (212) 
769-5310 

Ancient Stories and 
Current Affairs 

Friday. March 18 

Sharks have been swim- 
ming in the oceans for more 



than 415 million years — 
long before any animals with 
backbones appeared and long 
after the last of the dinosaurs. 
John Maisey. curator in the 
Department of Vertebrate 
Paleontology, will introduce 
the basics of shark fossil re- 
mains and evolution to show 
that sharks are ancient ani- 
mals. 

Rii hard I His, a famous 
shark painter, will talk about 
what makes a shark a shark 
by introducing shark biology 
and illustrating how sharks 
adapt to their environment 
He will also discuss shark 
research and his work painl 

ing them 

A walk through Sharks' 

Fact and Fantasy will follow 
the lecture. 

The program will take 
place from 7:00 to 8.00 p.m. 
in the Hall of Ocean Life 
Tickets are $9 for Members 
and $10 for non-Members. 



Shark Tales 

Recommended forages 
preschool through Grade 6 
Saturday. March 12 

Eugenie Clark, professor al 
the University of Maryland 
and coauthor of the childn 
book The Desert Beneath 
the Sea. will read 5tOi 
about her adventur s swim 
ming with and studying 
sharks as well as Othffl nnder- 
sea stories. Parti. i| >.>i its will 
also see slides and a video of 
Eugenie swimming with a 
whale shark, diving Inasub 
mersible, and observing a 
deep-sea octopus. Parti< I 
pants view the Sharks.' Fact 
and Fantasy exhibition on 
their own 

The program will take 
place from 1030 to 
11 30 a m inthe Kcini 
mann Theater. 'In kes are 
$9 for Members and $10 
for non Memheis 



Workshops for Young People 




Windowsill Garden 
Workshop 

Saturday. April 23 

(for Earth Day) 

10-30 a.m.-12-.30 p.m. 

Ages 6 and older, each 
accompanied by an adult 

Start a salad on your win- 
dowsill. Plant lettuce, roots, 
and herbs, plus flowers to 
garnish your table. Presented 
by science instructors Uta 
Gore and Jay Holmes. $10, 
and all materials are provided. 



Archeology 

Two Sundays. April 24 and 

May 1 

11:00 a.m.-l -.00 p.m. 

Grades 4 and 5 (ages 9-11) 
Students participate in the 
excavation of a simulated 
archeologicai site in the class- 
room. Slide presentations, 
hands-on demonstrations with 
fossils and artifacts, and a visit 
to an exhibit of a dig site help 
youngsters understand the 
field techniques used by 
archeologists. Presented by 
Anita Steinhart. teacher at Kb 
23 in Queens. $30. 

Inside Your Body 

Saturday, April 9 
10:30 a.m.-l 30 p.nv 
Grades 2 and 3 (ages 7-9) 
What's underneath your 
skin? In this program children 
listen to their heartbeats 
examine X-rays, and find out 
what makes their bodies 
work Presented by Dina 
Cukier Schlesinger, science 
teacher at PS 140 in Manhat 
tan. $25. 



Japanese Doll-Making 

Saturday. April 9 
10:30 a.m.-l 30 p.m 
Grades 3 and 4 (ages 8-10) 
In Japan dolls have their 
own festival. Heirloom dolls 
represent the imperial family 
and samurai protectors. 
Japanese craftsmen also 
make simple wooden dolls, 
paper dolls, and elaborate 
dolls dressed in beautiful ki- 
monos. Learn about the van- 
etv of Japanese dolls and 
make your own to display and 
bring good luck. Presented by 
Karen Kane, senior instructor 
in the Education Department 
$25 

Microscopic Adventures 

Saturday. April 16 
10:30 am- 130 p.nr 
Grades 3 and 4 (ages 8-10) 

Discover the miniature 
world of fish, scales, feathers, 
fur crystals, and more under 
the microscope Children 
learn how to compare diiter- 
ent kinds of animal and plant 
cells and make microscope 
slides to view living organ- 
isms. Presented by Uta Gore, 
science instructor in the Edu- 
cation Department $*>• 



Ufs Make Shadow 
Puppets 

Saturday, April lb 
10:30 am -130 p."v 
Grades 1 and 2 (ages 6-8) 

Shadow puppets have 
played a part in the religion. 
More, and entertainment of 

manycultun ^ will 

have fun making puppets for 



a shadow puppet theater and 
will hear and tell stories using 
these and other puppets. 
Presented by Ron Sopyla, 
instructor at the Westside 
Montessori School. $25. 

From Bone to Stone 

Preuiew of the new fossil 
mammal halls. Sunday, 
March 20. 10:30 a.m- 
11 30 a.m. 
Workshop: Saturday, 
April 23: 10:30 am- 
1:30 pm. 
Grades 3 and 4 
(ages 8-10) 

Skeletons turn to fossils 
when covered by mud that 
hardens into rock over mil- 
lions of vears. Fossil skeletons 
are often the only evidence 
we have of animals long ex- 
tinct. Join the private preview 
of the new halls of fossil 
mammals to explore past life 
on earth Children will sculpt 
their own clay "fossils. Pre- 
sented by Angela Tnpi-We.ss. 
art director at PS 87 in Man- 
hattan. $25 for workshop 
and preview. 

Sound and Music 

Saturday. April 30 
10:30 a.m.-l :30 p.m. 
Grades 1 and 2 (ages 6-8) 

Discover the world of 
sound and music. We'll 
demonstrate different types ol 

sounds and how they 
created, and we'll investigate 

a variety of musical instru- 
ments. Children will make 
their own instruments Pre- 
sented by Roy Mueller, spe- 
cial events coordinator and 
assistant manager at the Na- 
ture Company. South Street 
Seaport. $25. 



hands-on experience with 
specimens, children will gain 
a new appreciation for this 
marine predator, which now 
needs to be protected from 
people. Presented by Merry! 
Kafka, assistant director of 
education at the Aquarium for 
Wildlife Conservation. $25. 

Jungle Gymnastics 

Saturday, May 14 
10:30 a.m.-l:30 p.m. 
Grades 3 and 4 (ages 8- 10) 

Learn about animals by 
finding out what makes them 
i„ |, G I into their environ- 
ment by re-creating tli' 'I' 
movements. Children will 
make a mask of one of the 
Museums animals Presented 
by Brian O'Sullivan. instructor 
at the Calhoun School. $25. 

Undersea Neighbors 

Saturday, May 21 
1030 am -11 30 am 

4 -year-olds, each 
accompanied by one adnli 

Using specimens in an 
interactive story childrei 
learn about a variety of ma- 



un.' animals. Song, dance 
and a short film will highlight 
marine animals. A take home 
art project and visit to the Hall 
of Ocean Lit. UN included. 
Presented by Dayna Rei 
instructor at the Aquarium for 
Wildlife Conservation. $ 

Children Learn to Draw 

Saturday. May 14 
10-.30-1130 a.m. 

5-year-olds, each 
accompanied by one adult 
Young . hildren get a h«- 
start in art by leaning to 
drawwitheasy«ut materials 
and visiting somi- exhibition 
to draw animals within theli 
environmeni Aftei -lory 
time ,md a short video, etui 
drenwllli icate collage p. its 
totakehon ntedby 

Judith Levy, who has tan 
at the Carnegie Museumoi 
Art. $25. 

Use the coupon bel«-w i. ■ 
register early. Children should 

i^mg a bag lunch to all ; 
hoil! hops. For furthei 

i„f t „„,..t...n call (212) 769- 

10 



r DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
J Workshops for Young People 

I | would like to register for the following worksh< ., 

i 

', Workshop; — . 



i 



i 

i 
i 
i 

i 

i 



Student's last nai 

Age: Grade: — 

Parent's last name-. 
Address: 










Sensational Sharks 

Saturday. April 23 
Grades 2 and 3 (ages 
10:30 a.m-l:30 p.m. 

Long regarded with fear, 
the shark is a beautiful and 
graceful creature. Through 
slides, a visit to the Hall of 
Ocean Life, discussions, and 



City: 

Total amount enclosed: 

Register early. Class sizes are I ed. Separate ch 

P^notetStTue to limited registrar «| 

not " T^ h ur P check or money order 

Send this coupon with your check oi 
payables , Mu*um of N atui 

WeTNew York. NY 10024-5192 



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! 






Members' Tour 

Yaohan Plaza 

Sunday, April 24 

^fanTo^on^To Participating and Higher Members 

Appropriate for ages 16 and up 



Since its opening in 1988 
Yaohan Plaza has become an 
unofficial center of Japanese 
culture in the Greater New 
York area. Pat Kinney who 
hosts the Members' Work 
shop on Japanese Cuisine 
(see the article below), will 
take Members on an explo- 
ration of Yaohan. She'll 
translate Japanese-English 
signs ("almighty cook pal I 
for example, means "all- 
purpose") and point out items 
of interest (four is an unlucky 
number, so Japanese dishes 



are sold in sets of five) 

Participants can watch 
chefs prepare okonomiyaki. 
a Japanese favorite that 
wasn't available in this area 
until the opening of Yaohan. 
After twin ing a grocery store 
Members will have lunch, 
choosing from a wide variety 
of Japanese dishes prepared 
In the food court. They'll 
enjoy their authent i. 
Japanese lunch with a 
panoramic view of Riverside 
Church and the Manhattan 
skyline as the only reminder 



that they've crossed the Hud- 
son instead of the Pacific The 
trip will conclude with a visit 
to a Japanese department 
store that sells a wide vanety 
of Japanese goods, from tea 
sets to books and games. 

Participants will travel by 
bus from the Museum to Yao 
han Plaza, which is located in 
Edgewater. New Jersey, less 
than 30 minutes from mid- 
town Manhattan. Use the 
coupon on page 5 to register 
and please note that tickets 
are available only by mail 



Members' Workshop on 

Japanese Cuisine 

Sunday, March 6 

11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 2:00-3:30 p.m. 

$20, and open only to Participating 

and Higher Members 

Appropriate for ages 16 and up 



A special workshop ex- 
i ill its Japanese culinary 
traditions and their relations 
to folklore along with 
Japanese dining and tea 
drinking etiquette 

Host Pat Kinney will intro- 
duce several ingredients typ] 
I al to Japanese cuisine and 
, tastings Garnishes and 
flavorings such as shoga 
(i lidded ginger) and ao nori (a 
sea vegetable) will be sam- 
pled. Participants will taste 
azuki. the red beans that are 

i icd and used in con- 
fections and kombu. a form 
of seaweed that's the basic 
ingredient of Japanese soup 
and stock. Kombu is also 
prepared as a vegetable or 



Japanese tea ceremony 



made into salted or sweet- 
ened snacks. 

Kinney will explain what 
each ingredient is and how it 
is used in preparing many of 
the foods that Americans 
enjoy In l.ipanese restau- 
rants. After tasting an assort- 
ment of Japanese dishes 
participants will try to identify 
which ingredients were used 
In them. 

Host and producer of WV si 
Meets East on Vision Cable 
in New Jersey. Pat Kinney 
has worked closely with the 
Japanese community in 
Greater New York for a dozen 
years. She has produced a 
series of television Interviews 
in Japan for Fuji/ Sankei and 



has taught Japanese cooking 
at the New School. Blooming- 
dale's, and King's Cooking 
Studios. Kinney writes a regu- 
lar column for Bergen's The 
Record. "Neighbors from 
Japan,' - on Japanese culture 
in the New York area. This 
column also appears in Jomo 
Shimbun in Japan. 

Next month Kinney will 
lead Members on a tour of 
Yaohan Plaza in Edgewater. 
New Jersey, where she 
obtains many of the foods 
featured in the workshop (see 
i elated article above). 
Use the coupon on page 5 
to register, and please note 
that tickets are available only 
by mail. 



Members' Tours 

Sharks! 

Friday, March 4 

5:00 and 6:00 p.m. 

(The 4:00 and 7:00 p.m. 

tours are Sold Out) 

Free, and open only to 

Participating and Higher Members 




Whale shark 




The new Gallery 3 exhibi- 
tion offers a comprehensive 
view of sharks and shark be- 
havior, and Members can 
take guided tours of Sharks.' 
Facr and Fantasy to see how 
unique and diverse these ani- 
mals are. 

Volunteer Highlights Tour 
Guides will lead participants 
through a re-creation of an 
underwater habitat, complete 
with life-size models that dra- 
matically illustrate the variety 
of body size and form among 
species. The guides will dis- 



cuss aspects of shark mor- 
phology and behavior as well 
as the relationship between 
sharks and people, the role of 
sharks in myth and folklore, 
the commercial and scientific 
uses of sharks, and shark 
attacks and attack prevention 
The tours will also take a look 
at the sharks on display in the 
Museum's permanent collec- 
tions. 

The tours will last about 
45 minutes. Use the March 
Members' programs coupon 
on page 3 to register. 



Members' Birthday Parties at the Museum 

Shark Surprise 



Before there were 
dinosaurs, there were sharks. 
And before Jaws, there was 
the monster shark Carcharo- 
don megalodon. three times 
the size of the great white. In 
conjunction with the special 
exhibition Sharks! Fact and 
Fantasy, the Membership 
Office is throwing a special 
birthday party devoted to 
these living fossils. 

Young Members between 
the ages of 5 and 10 can 
invite their friends to a party- 
ing frenzy among some of 
their favorite sharks They'll 
learn what these amazing 
creatures like and don't like, 
how they swim, and how they 
use their superior senses. 
Crafts and shark-style games 
will add to the fun before the 
party-goers sink their jaws 
into ice cream and cake. 

In addition to the shark 
parties there are five other 
kinds of parties focusing on 
dinosaurs. African mammals, 
reptiles and amphibians. 



ocean dwellers, and Native 
Americans of the Great 
Plains 

The parties are two hours 
long and held at 3 30 p.m. 
on Wednesdays, at 4:00 p.m. 
on Fridays, and at 11:00 a.m 
or 2:30 p.m. on weekends. 
The group should be no 
fewer than 10 and no more 
than 20. The fee is $275 plus 
$15 per child and covers all 
materials, juice, ice cream, 
favor bags, and the services 
of a Museum party coordina- 
tor. The coordinator will help 
you plan a party that suits 
your child's needs and tastes, 
and on the day of the party, 
she'll handle everything from 
candles to party favors. All 
you need to do is bring the 
cake and help escort your 
child's guests 

Shark parties are available 
only for the duration of the 
temporary exhibition, which 
closes on May 1 For more 
information about the parties, 
call (212) 769-5542. 






8 




Current Exhibitions 



Sharks! 

Fact and Fantasy 

The cuirent Gallery 3 exhi- 
bition features an underwater 
habitat and life-size models of 
some of the marine world s 
most fascinating predators. 
Live stingrays and a pair of 
sharks in tanks are also fea- 
tured. Sharks! Fact and Fan- 
tasy is on display through 
May 1 See page 8 for details 
of Members' tours. 

Waura 

A selection of drawings by 
the Waura Indians of Brazil's 
Upper Xingu River region is 
on display in the Akeley 
Gallery Geometric designs, 
anthropomorphic figures, and 
mythological or supernatural 
beings are among the draw- 
ings' themes, along with ani- 
mal images such as tapirs, 
monkeys, bats, and snakes. 
The exhibition will be on 
display through April 24. 
See page 5 for details of a 
Members program relating to 
the exhibition. 



Librarian's Choice 

An exhibit of rarities from 
the Museum Library's exten- 
sive collections is on display 
in the Library Gallery Librar- 
ian's Choice: Treasures 
from 124 Years of Collect- 
ing features items from the 
Rare Book, Photograph u 
Film, Art. and Archives col- 
lections The gallery is located 
on the fourth floor. 

The Barosaurus 

The world's tallest free- 
standing dinosaur exhibit, a 
five-story-high Barosaurus. is 
on display on the second 
floor of the Roosevelt Memo- 
rial Hall 

The Museum houses the 
world's largest and most com- 
prehensive collection of fossil 
vertebrates, and work on a 
new exhibition area is under 
way on the fourth floor. The 
halls of Earth History, Late 
and Early Mammals, and Late 
and Early Dinosaurs are 
closed for renovations. The 
first of the new halls will open 
later this year. 



^springV s ^ here 

Celebrate 



Easter Sunday 

April 3rd 

Mother's Day 

Sunday, May 8th 
Holiday Buffet 

1 him - I l>in 
A.lulis $16.95 Children nndur 10, 18.95 

K«-.,«ti«Mo/«« luwinlni 

Call the Garden < afc«l212 m 5865 
I ir.l on the Lower Level 



Friends of Fishes presents 

White Death in the V 

An Evening with Richard Ellis 

Wednesday, April 13 

7:00 p.m. 

Main Auditorium 

$8 for Members, $10 for non-Members 



Richard Ellis will host an 
exhilarating and terrifj 

encounter with the great 
white shark White Death in 
the Water: An Euening u>lth 
Richard El/is takes audiences 
Down Under to Adelaide and 
Port Lincoln, where they'll 
board the dive boat Nenad 
and set out on a grim and 
dangerous search for the 
shark Australians call White 
Deal 1 1 



Adventures include ad 
up of a 15-foot great white as 
H tears chunks of meat and 
fish from the bars of Ellis's 

ing cage, a dive with 
lions to learn how the great 
white hum- and a look at ihe 
biggest great white shark ever 
caught on a rod and reel, 
ich weighed in Bl 2 i->64 

pounds. 

A well-known authority on 
marine life, Ellis is the co- 



author of Great White Shark 
(Stanford Universit! Press), 
which is considered the 
di finltlve book on the subje< I 
; the let lure there will be 
,nd book signing 
In the I lall of Ocean Life and 
Ellis will answer questions 
aD0U l sharks Use the coupon 
below to ordi ndfor 

addition. ii Information i all 

(212 161 

360-260 i 





Diuer and great white shark in South Australia 



Seining Hudson River Fishes 

Featuring an old-fashioned shad bake 
at George's Island 

Saturday, May 14 

160° and o^nMo Participating and Higher Members 




Come try your luck at the 
age-old art of seining. Mem- 
bers of Friends of Fishes, the 
Hudson River Foundation 
and the Museum's Depart- 
ment of Ichthyology will host 
a day of fishing, eating, ai 
learning at George's Island on 
the Hudson River near Cro- 
ton. New York. 

Participants will wade into 
the water and use seining 
nets to help gather fish from 
the Hudson. Museum scien- 
tists will help identify the 
catch and discuss the variety 
of local fishes and their life 
cycles, illustrating their talks 
with cleaned and stained 
specimens from the 
Museum's collection. For 
those who prefer to stay 

lore, there will be geology 
talks about the lower Hudson 
River Valley and the forma- 
tion of George's Island and 
Croton Point 

Lunch will feature a 
gourmet selection of fish, 
salads, side dishes, dessert, 
and juices, soda, beer, and 
wine. The day's specialty will 
be shad, a local spring catch 
that was once so abundant 



the earlv settlers called it A I 
bany steak. Chris Letts oi the 

Ison River Foundation will 
officiate at a traditional shad 

... nailing the fish to white 
oak planks for baking and 
smoking over an open ft 

Wear comfortable cloth- 
and bring bathing suits, tow- 
els for sun bathing, waders or 



boots, and a hearty appetit 
I prii i ini ludes lum h 
„„i ,,,„, iportation from th< 

Mils. ' 

i availability is limited I 
through mail ordei I 
furthei infon ill ,: ' ' 

28<) 160 .01 fa> ' 11 !) H 

.upon below 



Friends of Fishes Registration Form 



Nan" igram(s) 

Number of tickets:. 



Total amount enclosed:. 



Name:. 



Address: 

— 



Daytime telephone:. 



State 



_Zip: 



Membership category: . 

Please make check payable to Friends of Fishes, AMNH 
r^fm^il with , self addressed, stamped envelope 
f Zltnd Tot Rs"« 5 ■„-,-. men. of I, hthy< 
Ame'r Mulm 'of "iur/History .Centra. Park West 
at 79th Street. New York NY 10024 T> 192 



Courses for 




ASTRONOMY: 
BASIC COURSES 



Introduction to 
Astronomy 

I ioht Tuesdays, beginning 
,ch 29; 6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

\ tni 1 1 lurse in astronomy, 
tned to introduce the 
in. my interesting aspects of 
the universe to those without 
a math or physics back- 
ground. Topics include earth 

i planet, the moon, the 
■,,,1.11 system the stars the 
Milky Way, galaxies, quasars, 
and black holes. Common 
observations such as planet 
tions and the rising and 
ol the sun and moon 
are explained. No previous 
iwledge of astronomy is 
umed Instructor: Sune 
on. 

Adventures in Astronomy 

1 1 days, beginning 
9 in 1 1.40 a.m. 
50 for Members 
$75 for non-M> ml 
Confused about the differ 
iirivveen a star and a 
planet? Can't tell astronomy 
nology? Don't know 
- from Sagittanus or a 
black hole from a brown 
loin us for anew 
urday course for the whole 
i.jges 10 and up) In 

I l„ iUi and in labs 

with astronomical equipn 
we will explore the birth and 
death of stars the origin of 
the universe, the search for 
and the 
current night sky Instrvu 
tig Small. 



Stars. Constellations, and 
Legends 

Five Tuesdays, beginning 
March 29; 6:30-8:10 p.m. 
$58.50 for Members 
$65 for non-Members 

The lore of the sky is intro- 
duced with the Sky Theater's 
Zeiss projector, which will 
identify the prominent stars, 
constellations, and other sky 
objects of both Northern and 
Southern Hemispheres. The 
myths and legends of many 
cultures relating to the sky. as 
well as galaxies, star clusters, 
and nebulae found among the 
constellations, are illustrated. 
No prerequisites. Instructor: 
Henry J Bartol. 



clusters, and galaxies that are 
visible through binoculars or 
small telescopes. Instructors. 
Joe Rao and Henry J. Bartol. 

How to Use a Telescope 

Eight Mondays, beginning 
March 28; 6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$85 50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

An introduction to choos- 
ing and using a small amateur 
telescope. Topics include 
basic optics of telescopes, 
equatorial and altitude-az- 
imuth mountings, eyepieces, 
collimating a telescope, set- 
ting up for observation, locat- 
ing objects in the sky. and the 
use of charts and other aids 
for observation. No previous 
knowledge of astronomy is 
assumed. This course is par- 
ticularly recommended for 
i hose considering the pur- 
chase of a telescope and for 
those who have one but 
aren't sure how to use it. 
Instructor; Sam Storch. 



ASTRONOMY: 

INTERMEDIATE 

COURSES 

The New Solar System 

Eight Thursdays, beginning 
March 31; 6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

Information supplied by 
spacecraft during the past 
decade has made the planets 
exciting subjects for scientific 
study. This course will intro- 
duce the planets both as parts 
of the entire solar system and 
as unique bodies. Structure, 
composition, weather, rings, 
and satellite systems of the 
planets are among the topics 
to be included. Images from 
the many planetary spacecraft 
will be used to complement 
the class lectures and discus- 
sions. Introduction to As- 
tronomy is recommended but 
not required. Instructor: 
Francine Jackson. 



— how it works and how it 
affects us. Topics include the 
structure and motions of the 
atmosphere, climate, weather 
forecasting, and atmospheric 
optics such as rainbows, 
halos. and twinkling stars. No 
formal training in physics or 
math is required Instructor: 
Barry Grossman. 



AVIATION 

Ground School for Private 
and Commercial Pilots 

Fifteen sessions. Tuesdays 
and Thursdays, beginning 
March 29; 630-9:00 p.m. 
$166.50 for Members 
$185 for non-Members 

This course helps private 
and commercial pilots pre- 
pare for the FAA written 
examinations. It can also help 
as a refresher for biennial 
flight reviews, relieve some 
instances of fear of flying, and 
survey some aspects of flight 
training and aircraft owner- 
ship. Subjects include physio- 
logical factors affecting pilot 
performance, visual and elec- 
tronic navigation (VOR, ADF, 
DME. SAT, NAV. and 
LORAN). charts, publications, 
computers, principles of aero- 
dynamics, and weather. Stu- 
dents will plan cross-country 
trips and have an opportunity 
to try the flight deck simula- 
tor. Instructor: Ted Cone. 

Ground School for 
Instrument Pilots 

Fifteen sessions, Tuesdays 
and Thursdays, beginning 
March 29: 6:30-9:00 p.m. 
$166.50 for Members 
$185 for non-Members 

Intended for those planning 
to take the FAA written ex- 
amination for an instrument 
rating. Class meets twice a 
week, concurrently with 
Ground School for Instru- 
ment Pilots (see above for 
details). 



Celestial Highlights 

Four selected Mondays: May 
16. June 13, July 18. August 
] . 6:30-7:40 p.m 

for Members 
$40 for non-Members 

fhis i ourse will focus on 
the Interesting and exciting 
event- In the skies ol 
i fining month. The nighi 
will be accurately simulated by 
the Zeiss projectoi In the Sky 
Theater, and. students will 
learn how to find prominent 
constellations of the season 
and where at id wl len to see 
gatherings of the moon and 
planets. The Planetarlun 
extensive collection of special 
effects will illustrate up< oming 
celestial events, including 
meteor showers and 1 1 li| 

dents will also learn about 
current space missions and 
how to find nebulae, star 



NAVIGATION: 
BASIC COURSE 

Navigation in Coastal 
Waters 

Eight Mondays, beginning 
April 4, 6:30-9:00 p.m. 
$99 for Members 
$1 10 for non-Members 

An introduction to piloting 
and dead reckoning for pres- 
ent and prospective owners 
of small boats. The course 
provides practical chartwork 
and includes such topics as 
the compass, bearings, fixes, 
buoys and lighthouses, the 
running fix. current vectors 
and tides, and rules of the 
nautical road. Boating safety 
is emphasized. No prerequi- 
sites. Students are required to 
purchase an equipment kit 
Instructor: Gregory Smith. 

NAVIGATION: 
ADVANCED COURSE 

Advanced Celestial 
Navigation 

Eight Wednesdays, beginning 
March 30; 6.30-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

This course includes subject 
matter not covered in Intro- 
duction to Celestial Naviga- 
tion with additional practice 
problems for the solution of 
the celestial line of position, 
latitude by meridian transit of 
the sun and other celestial 
bodies, latitude by observation 
of Polaris, computations of 
sunrise, sunset, moonrise, 
moonset, and twilight phe- 
nomena. Other subjects in- 
clude navigational astronomy, 
star identification by altitude 
and azimuth methods, and 
azimuth computations for 
determining compass error 
and deviation at sea. Prereq- 
uisite Introduction to Celes 
tial Navigation or equivalent 
experience with the permis- 
sion of the instructor. Instruc- 
tor: Harold A. Pamham. 



A Little Look at Relativity 

Four Tuesdays, beginning 
March 29, 6 30-8:10 p.m. 
$67.50 for Members 
$75 for non-Members 

This short course is de- 
signed to serve as a brief 
introduction to Einstein s 
General and Special Theories 
of Relativity. A basic under- 
standing of elementary alge- 
bra will be helpful, but no 
extraordinary 1Q is necessary. 
Just be prepared to check 
logic and common sense at 
the door and you will be 
ready to enter the exotic 
world of time travel, black 
holes, cosmic wormholes, and 
more Instructor: William 
Gutsch. 



METEOROLOGY 

Weather and Climate 

Eight Thursdays, beginning 
March 31, 6:30-8:40 pm 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

Everyone talks about the 
weather This course Is for 
those who would like to know 
more about the atmosphere 



! Courses for Stargazers 

| I would like to register for the following Planetarium 
! course(s): 



Name of course: 

Price; Please note that discount prices apply only to 

Participating and Higher Members.) 

Class beginning: 



Name: 



Address; 
City. 



_State: 



_Zip:. 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: 

Please mail this coupon with your check payable to the 
American Museum-Hayden Planetarium to: Courses for 
Stargazers, Hayden Planetarium. Central Park West at 
81st Street. New York. NY 10024-5192 Registration by 
mail is strongly recommended and is accepted until seven 
days preceding the first class. For additional information. 
(212) 769-5900, Monday-Friday. 9:30 a.m -4 30 
p.m No credit cards accepted. Do not include 
ticket requests or checks for American Museum 
programs. 



i 

L. 






10 



Museum Notes 



Hours 

Exhibition Halls 

Mon.-Thurs. & Sun 10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

FiT&Sat. .. 10:00 a.m-8 45 p.m. 

The Museum Shop 

Mon.-Thurs. & Sun 10:00 a.m.-5 45 p.m. 

Fri.&Sat ...10:00 a.m.-7:45 p.m. 

The Junior Shop 

Mon -Fri 10:00 a.m-445 p m 

Sat. & Sun 10:00 a.m-5:45 p.m. 

The Museum Library 

Tues.-Fri 11 00 am -4:00 p.m. 

The Discovery Room 

Passes are distributed at the first-floor informa- 
tion desk beginning at 1145 a.m. Ages 5-10. 
Children must be accompanied by an adult. 
Closed on holidays and weekdays^ 

Sat. & Sun Noon-4:30p.m 

The Natural Science Center 

For children of all ages and their families. 
Closed on Mondays and holidays. 
Tue , _ F ri 10-30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 

lueS & 2:00-4:30 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun l:0<M:30p.m 

Museum Dining 

D, D* aUrU5 FaS ' Se ™" ^SOO a.m.-4:45 p.m. 

Garden Cafe «,-„,-,. 

Reservations. (212) 769-5865 

Lunch. Mon-Fri 113 °f ? n 1 ™ n m 

Dinner; Fri.&Sat ^ 53 °~lr^ P « 

Brunch: Sat. & Sun. 1 1:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

Wh F alesUir ..3:00-8:00 p.m. 

^ .Noon-8:00 p.m. 

Sun. & most holidays.. u N ° on -^ 00 p , m 

Snack Carts (at 77th Street & on the first floor of 
the Roosevelt Memorial Hall) 

Sat & Sun 11:00 a.m-4:00 p.m. 



Entrances 

During Museum hours uisitors can enter the 
building through the 77th Street entrance, the 
parking lot entrance (81st Street), or the Roo- 
sevelt Memorial Hall entrance (79th Street and 
Central Park West) Visitors attending pro- 
grams after hours can enter the building 
through the driveway entrance at 79th 
Street and Central Park West. 



Parking 

The Museum's parking lot is located on 81st 
Street between Central Park West and Columbus 
Avenue Space is limited and available on a /irst- 
come, first-served basis, fees are $12 for cars and 
$11 for buses. The lot is open from 9.30 a.m. to 
9:30 p.m. on Sunday through Thursday and from 
9 30 am. to midnight on Friday and Saturday 

Hertz Manhattan, located one block away from 
the Museum at 210 West 77th Street (between 
Broadway and Amsterdam), offers parking 
discounts to Members: on Monday through 
Friday they receive a $2 discount off regular 
prices and on Saturday and Sunday Members 
receive a $3 discount. ~* n £ 

Call the Membership Office at (212) 769-5606 
for information about alternative parking. 

Naturemax , 

The new /MAX film Search for the Great Sharks 
takes viewers on an incredibly exciting under- 
water cinematic experience. They'll go on a 
round-the-globe expedition to discover some o/ 
the world's largest sharks and to observe them at 
close range. Blue sharks, white sharks, and the 
notorious great white shark are pursued from the 
coast of California to the remote reaches of 
southern and western Australia. 

Showtimes for Search for the Great .Sharks .are 

10 30 and 11:30 a.m., 130 and 3-.3C ) p.m. daily . 
To the Limit, an exploration of the adaptation of 

the human mind and body to conditioning for 



Happenings at the Hayden 



Lectures 

Frontiers in Astronomy and Astrophysics 

On Monday, March 14, at 7:30 P m Dale 
Cruikshank of the NASA Ames Research Center 
will present an illustrated talk. The ley Edge of Our 
Solar System: Pluto and Beyond ." Cruikshank will 
discuss the latest research regarding Pluto and 
NASA's plans to visit the planet. 

On Monday. April 11, at 7:30 p.m George 
Smoot will present an illustrated talk. Cosmology 
and the Cosmic Background Explorer. Smoot, a 

research physicist at the ^ enc ^ rk ^«^ c ~ 
torv will discuss new observations from he Cosmic 
Background Explorer satellite and how these obser- 
vations reinforce the current understanding of the 
universe's creation and evolution^ 

These lectures are part of the Frontiers m As- 
tronomy and Astrophysics series ^Tickets are $6 
for Participating and Higher Members and $8 for 
non-Members. For information about tjeke^ri- 
ability and upcoming lectures call (212) 769 b^UU. 
Use the coupon at right to order tickets. 



outstanding physical performance, is shown at 

12:30. 230. and 430 P-m. 
On Friday and Saturday at 6 00 and 7.30 p m 

Search for the Great Sharks Is shown on a double 

bill with To the Limit. Schedules and P™esare 

subject to change without notice. Call (212) 7bV 

5650 for further information 

Admission (Participating and Higher Membois) 
Adults $4 single feature. $5.50 double feature 
Children: $2 single feature. $3 double feature 



Museum Tours 

Free Museum Highlights Tours are available to 
Individuals and families. Tours are conducted 
daily at 1015 and 1115 a.m. 1 15. 2.15. and 
3.15 p m and depart from the second floor be- 
tween the Roosevelt Rotunda and the Hall of 
African Mammals. 

Group Tours are available for a fee. All Group 
Tours must be scheduled through the Vblun 
0//ice. For details. , all (212) 769 5566. 

Phone Numbers 

Museum information (212)769-5100 

Membership information (for questions about 

Museum events) 1212 

Participating Members' Customer Service f/oi 

questions and problems related to Rotunda and 
Natural History magazine missed issues, 
address changes, and other 
information) •• (800)2 h &AMNH 

Planetarium inform,.. ; ' 

Education Department ^769 5700 

D ^^t^eouS'NS |§|6|7 o 

SS**3S Affairs 212 7695270 

Volunteer Office... "ffiSSgtlSO 

Museum Shop 212 7 

Library Service 111 769-5500 

Natural History magazine 212 7' 

Members' Book Program 1 2) 769-5oOU 



Sky Show 



Orion Rendezvous...A Star Trek' 
Voyage of Discovery 

Climb aboard the starship Antares for a cosmic 
journey Actor LeVar Burton joins tecrwasl** 
tenant Commander Geordi La Forge, the character 
he plays on Star Trek. The Next Generation^ 
Enter the twenty-fourth century and learn about the 
variety of stars in the universe. 

Showtimes-. , Qn 

Mon -Fri l 30 and P 

Sat.: 1 1 :00 a.m. (except for March 5 and April 9) 
100 200 3:00. 4:00, and 5:00 p.m. 

Sun 1:00.' 2:00. 300. 4:00. and 5:00 , p m. 

For prices and additional information, call Ui^J 
769-5900. 

Children's Shows 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers. Children sing along with images oi 
their favorite Sesame Street Muppets as they learn 



about rainbows, the phases of the moon, sunsets, 
and stars. Sat.. March 5. at 10:30 a.m., and Sat., 
April 9 at 10:30 and 1145 am For pnees and 
ticket information, call (212) 769-5900 

Robots in Space features Lucasf.lm s R2D2 and 
C-3PO- and has been created especially for chil- 
dren ages 7 to 12. Together with a live host, these 
famous space robots take children on a tour of the 
universe. See how satellites and probes — the real 
space robots — help us learn about worlds near and 
far. Journey from the earth to other planets and 
distant black holes. Sat.. March 5. and Sat., May 7, 
at 11 45 a.m. Admission for Participating and 
Higher Members is $4 for adults and $2 for chil- 
dren. For additional information call [111] /W- 
5900 



Exhibition 

Space Places: 

A Photographic Art Exhibit 

The Planetarium presents an exciting 
photographic display. Space Places, by world_ 
renowned photographer Roger Ressmeyer The 
exhibition is a collection of photographs incorporat- 
ing the human, mystical, and technical sides of 
space with an emphasis on internationally strategic 
centers The photographs highlight the latest space 
technologies as well as the h.storical and monumen- 
tal centers of the international space age. On dis- 
play through May 15. 



Laser Shows 

Journey into another dimension where laser vteu- 
als and rock music combine to create a dazzling 3-D 
experience of sight and sound. Show ja« presented 
on Fridays and Saturdays at 7 00 8 30. ark I 10.00 
p m For prices and show schedule, telephone 
(212)769-5100. 



Its always a good idea to call before visit- 
inq the Planetarium, since prices, programs 
and showtimes are subject to change without 
notice. For general Planetarium information, 
call (212) 769-5100. 



^ Lecture: "The Icy Edge of Our Solar Sys 
' tern: Pluto and Beyond." Monday, March 14, 

I 7:30 p.m. 

! Number of Members' tickets at $6 

! (no more than 4. please). — 

! Number of non-Members' tickets at $8: — 

J Total amount enclosed: — 

! Lecture: "Cosmology and the Cosmic 
! Background Explorer." Monday, Apnl 11. 

! 7 30 p.m 

J Number of Members' tickets at $6 

[ (no more than 4. please) 

1 Number of non-Members* tickets at *8. — 

! Total amount enclosed: — 



Name:. 



Address: 



i City: 



State 



.Zip:. 



', Daytime telephone: 



Membership category:. 



Please make check payable to the Hayden 
Planetarium and mail with a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to Lecture Hayden 
Planetarium. Central Park West at 81st Str. 

New York. NY 10021 .] 

Please note th orders are subject to 

availability and cannot be processed 
telephone number and stamped sell ..ddressed 
elope Do not include ticket requests or 
checks for American Museum programs. 



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For Participating and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



Vol. 19. No. 5 May 1994 




Charles Knight's restored masterpiece. Rancho La Brea Tar Pit, is on permanent display 
in the new Lila Acheson Wallace Wing of Mammals and Their Extinct Relatives 



Fossil Mammal Halls Reopen This Month 

Exhibition halls open to general public: Saturday, May 14 
Members' preview: Friday, May 13 



This month the Museum launches 
its 125th anniversary celebration with 
the opening of two new fossil mam- 
mal halls, the first halls completed in a 
spectacular renovation and restructur- 
ing of the fossil exhibitions. 

The renovation project, which is to 
be completed in 1996, will create six 
new halls that tell the story of verte- 
brate evolution with the most exten- 
sive and scientifically important array 
of fossils ever assembled. The two 
halls opening this month are known 
as the Lila Acheson Wallace Wing of 
Mammals and Their Extinct Relatives 
and display the world's greatest collec- 
tion of fossil mammals The dinosaurs 
will return next year, and in 1996 an 
orientation center and a hall of primi- 
tive vertebrates will debut. 

Fossil exhibitions are traditionally 
organized on a chronological basis, 
leading visitors on a time line from the 
beginning of life 3.5 billion years ago 
to the present day The Museum is 



using a different approach that takes 
visitors on a walk through vertebrate 
evolution, viewing exhibits organized 
in the pattern of a family tree. 

This approach is based on the Mu- 
seum's research and its role in bring- 
ing evolutionary patterns to light. 
Information in the halls emphasizes 
the dynamic nature of science, explor- 
ing both known and speculative ele- 
ments of ancient life forms and 
offering a variety of arguments and 
theories about the history of life. 

Members' Preview and 
Tours 

On Friday. May 13. Members can 
take a look at Protohippus, a 12- 
million-year-old ancestor of the horse; 
Andrewsorchus. the biggest of the 
land-dwelling carnivorous mammals 
and Amphicyon. a ferocious bear-dog 
in pursuit of the antelope-like Ramo- 
ceros. They'll see mastodons, saber- 



toothed cats, and giant sloths on dis- 
play in the Lila Acheson Wallace 
Wing of Mammals and Their Extinct 
Relatives before the new halls open to 
the general public 

The preview is free and open only 
to Participating and Higher Members 
upon presentation of a valid member- 
ship card. The halls will be open be- 
tween 4:00 and 8:30 p.m. 

On the evening of the preview 
Members can attend A Look at the 
Building of the Fossil Halls, a pre 
sentation by the renovatli in program's 
project director. Paleontologist I owell 
Dingus has worked closely with cura- 
tors in developing the halK K lentific 
content. He'll talk about the exhibit 
which focus on the evolutionary roots 
of our own group of vertebrates by 
illustrating how different groups of 
living mammals evolved into a vast 
array of body types throughout the 
world. Dingus will also offer some 
background on how the halls were 



designed and built 

The program will take place at 7 II I 
p.m. in the Henry Kaufmann I tieatel 
Tick. 1 1 ee and available only to 

Parti. Ipating and Higher Men 
No more than tw mem 

bership can be ordered for this pro- 
gram Use the May Members' 
programs coupon on page 3 to order 

ets. 

On I rid i] lune 10. Participating 
,hi.I I liqhei Ml mbers car. ided 

the Wallace Wing. Volunt. 
I [IghUghl ■ I our guides will lead them 
around the new halls anddlscu ■ the 
specimens and the manner in whi< I . 
are displayed. The tours, which 
are appropriate for ages 13 and < il 
are free and will take place at 400. 
5:00 '.'"I and 7 00 p.m. Use the 
coupon on page 3 to register, and see 
page 2 for details of other Members' 
programs presented in conjunction 
:i the opening of the new exhilu 
tion halls. 



The Treasure of Trash 

Saturday, June 1 1 

11:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. 

$20 per couple, and open only to Participating 

and Higher Members 

Appropriate for ages 5-10 



Each week, millions of peo- 
ple carefully separate their 
trash and pul il outside to be 
picked up and taken to re 
cling But most people 

— espec [ally children — den I 
really know what happens to 
their empty plastic botl 
once they're taken away 

Linda Mandel and her 
daughter, Hedi Yorkes, 
teamed up to write The Trea- 

I'rash: A Recycling 
Story, a children's book that 
focuses on plastics and other 
products and how they are 



recycled The pair will host a 
Members' family program at 
which they'll discuss recycling 
and the environment They'll 
offer demonstrations of plas- 
tic recycling and the creation 
of plastic lumber, and they'll 
read highlights from their 
book. Each couple attending 
the program will receive a 
copy of The Treasure of 
Trash, an illustrated 44-page 
book that sells foi $12.95. 

Use coupon on page 5 to 
order tickets, which are avail- 
able only by mail. 




Members' Day Trip to 

The 

Newark 

Museum 

Thursday, June 2 

Noon-5:00 p.m. 

$40, and open only 

to Participating 

and Higher Members 

Appropriate 

for ages 16 and older 

New Jersey's largest mu- 
seum complex, the Newark 
Museum houses world- 
i.nowned art and science 
collections. Members can take 
docent-led tours of the mu- 
ni i s collection of twenh 
<ili i enluiy Ann in .m art and 
see a major traveling exhlbl 
Hi in of photographs. 

American Art In the Mod- 
ern Era explores the world of 




George Segal's 1968 sculpture 
"The Parking Garage'' 



twentieth-century art as ex- 
pressed in the museum's 
i • 1II0 111 m of American paint- 
ing and sculpture. / Dream a 
World: Portraits of Black 
Women Who Changed 
America is a temporary ex- 
1 11I >ii ion of black-and-white 
portraits by Pulitzer Prize- 
winning photographer Brian 
Lanker, who captured the 
indomitable spirit of 76 



African-American women in 
fields ranging from medicine 
to government to sports. 

Each tour will last about an 
hour, and afterward Members 
will have another hour in 
which to explore on their 
own. Transportation is by bus 
from the American Museum. 
Use the coupon on page 5 to 
order tickets, which are avail- 
able only by mail. 



Favorite Stories 

Wednesday, June 8 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$8 for Members, $12 for non-Members 



Central figures in the revival 
of storytelling in America, 
Gioia Timpanelli and Diane 
Wolkstein are masters of their 
art. They have delighted audi- 
ences throughout the United 
States with their folktales, 
myths, and personal stories. 
At the Members' program 
Favorite Stories they'll re- 
count stories of forests, moun- 
tains, and cities, stories full 
of surprises and humor; and 
adventure stories that are jour- 
neys into the interior. 

Gioia Timpanelli won the 
Women's National Book Asso- 
ciation Award for her work in 
the oral tradition; she also won 



two Emmies for her television 
series "Stories from My 
House.'' She has just com- 
piled a book of short stories 
based on Sicilian folktales 

Diane Wolkstein, who has 
25 years of storytelling expe- 
rience, is the author of 17 
books of folklore, including 
Inanna and The First Love 
Stories. Her newest book is 
Step by Step. She teaches 
storytelling at Bank Street 
College and was recently 
featured on "Charles Kuralt 
Sunday Morning " 

Use the May Members' 
programs coupon on page 3 
to register. 



Origami Theater 

Wednesday, June 15 

3:30 p.m. 

Under Theater 

$5 for Members, $8 for non-Members 



Come to one of the small- 
est theaters in the world: a 
diminutive stage with just 
enough room for a pair of 
hands and a sheet of paper. 
The hands move deftly to 
transform the paper into a 
swan or a fox, a peacock or a 
Then the head and heart 
that are in charge of the 



hands appear to tell a little 
story or fable about the figure 
they've just created. 

Marieke de Hoop has taken 
her origami theater from her 
home in Holland to audiences 
In England, France Germany, 
uida. and Japan. The peo- 
ple who watch her folding 
fingers experience the same 



thrill that origami artists feel 
every time they pick up a 
sheet of paper to fold a crane 
or a stegosaurus or any of an 
infinite variety of figures. Tins 
thrill is a feeling Maneke calls 
onkadabra. 

Use the May Members' 
programs coupon on page 3 
to register 



Members' Cruise 

on Long Island Sound 

Saturday, May 7, Noon-4:00 p.m. 

$50 for Members, $60 for non-Members 



Spend a spring afternoon 
speeding along Long Island 
Sound on this Members' 
cruise. Participants will travel 
up the East River, through 
Hell Gate, and beneath the 
Throgs Neck Bridge into the 
sound. They'll view both the 
New York and Connecticut 
shorelines on the way to New 
Haven Harbor and back. 

Sidney Horenstein. the 



Museums coordinator of 
environmental public pro- 
grams, will host the cruise and 
point out landmarks along the 
way. He'll discuss the origins 
of the sound, the geology of 
the shorelines, and the history 
of some of the towns 

Bring a bag lunch; refresh- 
ments are available on board. 
Call (212) 769-5606 for 

ticket availability 



Calling All Hippos 



Thursday, June 30 
7:00 p.m. 
Kaufmann Theater 
$8 for Members, 
$12 for non-Members 

Little had been written 
about the social organization 
or underwater behavior of 
hippos when William Barklow 
traveled to Tanzania in 1 989 
to record their vocal reper- 
toire. Informal observations 
had convinced him that hip- 
pos can communicate with 
each other in a unique way. 

At the Members' program 
Calling All Hippos, Barklow 
will discuss his findings, which 
indicate that hippos have 
developed a system for com- 
municating in an amphibious 
environment. They can trans- 




mit sounds in stereo through 
both air and water and can 
receive sounds in stereo, with 
their jaws serving as an un- 
derwater channel and their 
ears as a surface channel. 
Their vocal sounds communi- 
cate subtle information in 
both air and water, and they 
have specialized underwater 
signals, including click trains 



similar to those employed by 
dolphins and whales. 

A professor in the Biology 
Department of Framingham 
State College in Massa- 
chusetts. William Barklow has 
studied loon vocalizations in 
northern Maine for two 
decades. Use the May Mem- 
bers' programs coupon on 
page 3 to register. 



Members' Walking Tour 

Prominent Geological 
Features of Central Park 



Wednesday, May 25 

3:00, 5:00, and 7:00 p.m. 

$20, and open only to Participating and Higher 

Appropriate for ages 16 and older 



Some of New York City's 
best rock exposures can be 
found in Central Park. These 
rocks display many features, 
large and small, that help 
geologists decipher the city's 
one-billion-year history 



Sidney Horenstein, the 
Museum's coordinator of 
environmental public pro- 
grams, will lead Members 
around the southern end of 
the park to observe the ef- 
fects of ancient continental 



Members 



collisions and the striations 
and grooves etched by a 
(relatively) recently departed 
glacier. 

Use the coupon below to 
register; tickets are available 
only by mail. 



Global Cultures 

in a Changing World 



The Education Department 
presents a year-long series 
reflecting a variety of cultural 
groups and their traditions in 
a changing world. May is 
Asian/Pacific American Her- 
itage Month. For additional 
information or a brochure, 
call (212) 769-5315. 

Sumi-E, Japanese Brush 

Painting 

Sunday, May 15 

At this workshop for adults, 
Motoi Oi teaches beginners 
the basic techniques of paint- 
ing with ink and brush. He'll 
show more advanced students 
how to create a landscape 
with birds, flowers, and water- 
falls. Noon-2.00pm 
Colder Laboratory, second 
floor. 

Free tickets will be 
distributed on the day of the 
workshop, starting at 10:30 
a.m.. on a first-come, first- 
served basis in the Leonhardt 
People Center. Only two 
tickets per adult in line. 

Yoshiko Chuma and the 
School of Hard Knocks 
Sunday, May 22 

Choreographer Yoshiko 
Chuma and the School of 
Hard Knocks present a con- 
temporary work based on the 
traditional Japanese concept 



of space and time. The move- 
ment and music collide in 
counterpoint and harmony, 
and the ma ("musical inter- 
val ") bears as much weight as 
the music and movement. 

The company of versatile 
performers dance, play instru- 
ments, and sing in an atmo- 
sphere of continuous motion 
and cacophony — like an 
orchestra playing three sym- 
phonies at once. At one mo- 
ment all action stops, and the 
space echoes profoundly with 
the silence of anticipation 
2:00 and 400 p.m. Kauf- 
mann Theater. 

Wilderness: 

Pan Asian Repertory 

Theatre 

Sunday, May 29 

Pan Asian Repertory The- 
atre presents excerpts from 
Wilderness, the third in a 
trilogy of plays by Chinese 
playwright Cao Yu The play, 
which stylistically resembles 
the work of Eugene O'Neill, 
involves betrayal, revenge, 
and love in its portrayal of the 
Chinese class struggle in the 
early twentieth century The 
highly suspenseful and erotic 
plot addresses social themes 
— freedom versus oppres- 
sion, modernization versus 
feudalism — and cames a 



Members' Walking Tour 

Chinatown's 
Herb Markets 

Sunday, May 15 

3:00-5:30 p.m. 

$20, and open only to Participating 

and Higher Members 

Appropriate for ages 16 and older 

SOLD OUT from previous issue 



Herbal treasures abound In 
the narrow streets of China- 
town — if you know whet, 
look for them. Spend a Sun- 
day afternoon on a guided 
tour of Chinatown's open 
markets and herbal shops. 
You'll find out where to ob- 
tain floral and spice teas to 
treat sore throats. heada< 
and common colds. 

The tour will cover a vari- 
ety of Chines.' cultural tradi- 
tions, trace the historical 
development of New Yoi I 
Chinatown, and explore the 
current economic boom hi 
the three Chinas — Hong 
Kong. Taiwan, and the Peo- 
ple's Republic. Participants 
will meet at the center of 
Chinatown in a park at tl ie 
corner of Baxter and Bayard 
Streets. They'll stop by the 






pertinent message to audi- 
ences around the world. 2.00 
and 4:00 p.m. Kaufmann 
Theater 

Leonhardt People Center 
Weekend Family 
Programs 
1:00-4:30 p.m. 

Demonstrations and perfor- 
mances are repeated several 
times during the afternoon. 
No tickets are necessary, but 
seating is limited and on a 
first-come, first-served basis. 
The People Center is closed 
on May 7 and 8 for Mother's 
Day weekend. 

May 14 and 15 

Songs from Vietnam 
Accompanying herself on the 
dan tranh. a 16-stnng zither. 
Phung Pham sings traditional 
songs usually performed at 
parties and state functions in 
Vietnam. 

May 21 and 22 

Na Hula O Hawai'i Net 
(The Dances of Hawaii). 
Radio Hula and Company 
demonstrate both the modem 
and ancient hula and show 
how the dance has preserved 
the history and customs of 
the Hawaiian people 

May 28 and 29 

Yellow Peril — Take Back 
the Word The group Yellow 
Peril uses rap to speak about 
stereotypes surrounding 
Asian Americans, including 
violence: martial-arts films, 
and Asian-American history. 



Chinatov in 

loc<it. < I .il 1 1 

yard and Mulberry and thi II 

also v ral herb and 

food shops, 1 1' ithlng and 
martnl arts boutiques, and 
Buddin-i temple 

Along the wav Members 
will eno 

veml outdoor fort 

tellers and shoemaki 
i.. i it will com lude near a 

me of Confucius at a ("In 
nese restaurant, where i 
h, ipants may wish to 
dlnnei (Ui kel puce does nol 
iih lude dinner) 

I etna I ladadl an acupuni 
luiist-herbalist, will lead the 
tours. No previous knowledge 

of herbs Is m 

bring a curiosity about the 
hidden riches of tins livi l; 
colorful pari ol the i Ity 



Lib A, I- 
Lav,,,.,, 
Found- 

Four.i '"" 



Membership Workshops and Tours. Use this COU] 
to register for Mammalnumui' Dei Ipherlng the I fum 
Skeleton, Trip to the Newark Museum and Members 

Fossil Reproduction Workshop (spe< ify Woolly 
Mammoth Tooth or Fossil) Indicate a 111 Si and scum- I 
choice of times for Central Park Tour; and I he 
Treasure of Trash and B fli ' and second choice ol til 
for seatings at the Stpan Din not 



Name(s) of prograi 



Number of tickets and price (please indicate which pro- 
gram if more than one): 



Total amount enclosed:. 



Name: 



Address: 
City: 



.State 



.Zip:. 



Daytime telephone:. 



Membership category: 

Please make check payable to the American Museum ol 
Natural History and mail with «» self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to Workshops and T 

Membersh.p Office. American Museum of Natural 
History. Central Park West at 79th Street. New York. NY 
10024-5192 



New Exhibition in the Library Gallery 

The World Explored: 
125 Years of 
Collecting Photographs 




Explorer Osa Johnson, a prolific contributor to the Museum's archives 



The American Museum has 
used photography and cine 

igraphy since its founding 
in 18(V> The Museum not 
only collected photographs 
from well I nown photogra- 
phers around the world but 
also used the camera as an 

ential tool in documenting 
expedition^ i ultures arti- 
facts, fauna, and habitats 
Today the Library has over 
million images and over 
3,000 reels of film that con- 
stitute a scientific and hist"M 
cal record from the middle 
nineteenth century to the 
present The World 
I cp/on d 125 Years of 
Collecting Photographs 
focuses on three elements of 
ill. collection: 

Albert Bickmore and the 
use of photographs in the 



Education Department The 
Museum's photo collection 
started in the Education De- 
partment as a resource for 
lei Hirers, scientists, and 
teachers Bickmore. the Mu- 
seum's founder, amassed over 
80,000 images, most of 
which were made into lantern 
slides and used in educational 
1 ii i igrams. Exhibits illustrate 
the creation and growth of 
the collection and include 
photos of Bickmore, his cor- 
respondence with well-known 
photographers, and numer- 
ous lantern slides. 

Collecting. Some of the 
collection's important pho- 
tographs are displayed, such 
as the earliest image in the 
collection: a July 1840 calo- 
type of flowers. Other dis- 
plays include the spectacular 



William H Bradford Arctic 
photographs from the 1880s 
and the historically valuable 
Joseph Dixon Native Ameri- 
can images from the Wanna- 
maker Expeditions. 

Use of photography by 
the Museum Photographs 
documenting the Museum's 
expeditions are displayed, 
including images from the 
Central Asiatic Expedition 
panoramic photographs 
taken in Africa by Carl Ake- 
ley: and photographs from 
the Johnson expeditions to 
Africa and Borneo. 

The exhibition will be on 
display through January of 
next year The Library Gallery 
is located on the fourth floor 
and open from Monday 
through Friday, from 10:00 
a.m. to 4:30 p.m 



Friends 
of Fishes 



Ing programs are 
presented by Friends ol 
I i I ii is To order tickets, make 
your check payable to Friends 
of Fishes/AMNH and send 
with a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope to: 

Fishes, Depaii 
ment of Ichthyology. Amen 
can Museum of Natuiil 
I listory 79th Street and Cen- 
tal ParkWesI New York. 
NY 10024-5192. For further 
u.l..rmation call (212) 2> 
i.()5 or fax (212) 360-6625. 



Seining Hudson 
River Fishes 

Saturday, May 14 

Members of Friends of 
he Hudson River 



Foundation, and the 
Museum's Department of 
Ichthyology will host a day of 
fishing eating, and learning 
at George's Island on the 
Hudson River near Croton, 
New York. 

Participants will wade into 
the water and use seining 
nets to help gather fish from 
the Hudson. Museum scien- 
tists will help identify the 
catch and discuss the variety 
of local fishes and their life 
Ulusl ' \\ Ing their talks 
with cleaned and stained 
specimens from the 
Museum's collections. Chris 
Letts of the Hudson River 
Foundation will officiate at a 
traditional shad bake, nailing 
the fish to white oak planks 
for baking and smoking over 
on open (in 

The trip will take place 
from 9:00 a.m. to 500 p m 
kets are $60 and available 
only to Participating and 
l holier Members n, I, t price 
includes lunch and transporta- 
tion from the Museum 



Breakfast by 
the Sea 

Sunday, May 22 

Private tours of the Aquar- 
ium for Wildlife Conservation 
feature a feeding of the 
sharks and marine mammals 
and a lecture by director 
Louis Garibaldi. The program 
begins at 8:00 a.m., tickets 
are $50 each. 

Clearwater 
Sunset Sail 

Monday, June 27 

Observe the beginning of 
summer on a cruise of New 
York Harbor aboard the 
Clearwater The cruise will 
embark from South Street 
Seaport and last from 6 00 to 
9:00 p.m. Cocktails and a 
cold buffet will be served. 
Dress is casual. Tickets are 
$100 per person, and space 
is limited to 40 guests Pro- 
ceeds benefit research by the 
Department of Ichthyology. 



Beijing 
to Hanoi 
Rail Journey 



From October 25 to 
November 12, Discovery 
Tours is chartering the China 
Orient Express for an excit 
ing new itinerary. This train 
journey offers a unique look 
at rural China and the fasci- 
nating but less-frequented 
provinces of the south — 
Shanxi, Sichuan, Yunnan, 
and the Autonomous Region 
of Guangxi-Zhuang. It will 
also explore the Red River 
Valley in northern Vietnam, 
which stretches from the 
border to the Gulf of Tonkil I 
the cradle of Vietnamese 
civilization. 

From Beijing. China's capi- 
tal since the days of Kublai 
Khan, travel to Xi'an. ancient 
capital and site of the spec- 
tacular terra-cotta army of 
China's first emperor, and to 
Changdu to observe efforts to 
save the rare giant panda of 
Sichuan's mountain forests 
from extinction. Take one of 
the country's most amazing 
train rides, from Changdu to 
Kunming, which traverses 
hundreds of mountain tunnels 
and bridges over steep 
gorges. While in Kunming, 
home to more than two 
dozen ethnic groups, visit the 



Stone Forest and its 200 
acres of naturally eroded lime- 
stone pillars, surrounded by 
unspoiled countryside, and 
see Guilin. whose misty, 
round-topped mountain land- 
scape has been immortalized 
by painters and poets over 
the centuries. 

The train crosses the Viet- 
namese border into Hanoi 
the 1,000-year-old capital. 
The city bears remnants of 
early Vietnamese dynasties, 
along with colonial buildings 
and broad avenues that are 
legacies of the French. This 
crossing from China into 
Vietnam comes at the perfect 
time to witness the country's 
opening to the West, which is 
certain to proceed at a quick- 
ening pace now that the 
United States has lifted its 
trade embargo 

Accompanying the tour are 
experts in Chinese history, 
art, and archeology, as well 
as Ross MacPhee, a curator 
in the Department of Mam 
malogy who has conducted 
fieldwork in China. For more 
information, call Discovery 
Tours at (800) 462-8687 or 
in New York State (212) 769- 

5700. 



^|spring|is|here^ 

Celebrate 



Mother's Day 

Sunday. May Hlh 

Holiday Buffet 
Ham if" 

\.lult- |16 95 « hildren under 10, 18 9 
Rotei i ationt itiggetled 

Call the Garden ' tfe ai 212 ,<.'' 5865 
Located on tl><- I^.».-r I -*- * •- 1 




Naturemax 




Rodney Fox, 
diver extraordi- 
naire, in Search 
for the Great 
Sharks 



The new IMAX film Search for the Great Sharks 
takes viewers on an incredibly exciting underwater 
cinematic experience. They'll go on a round-the- 
qlobe expedition to discover some of the world s 
larqest sharks and to observe them at close range. 
Blue sharks, whale sharks, and the notorious great 
white shark are pursued from the coast of California 
to the remote reaches of southern and western 

Australia. ., , 

Dramatic sequences include a swim alongside the 
seldom-seen 40-foot-long whale shark, the birth of 
a baby shark, the annual blossoming of a coral reef, 
and a gripping scene in which a diver, encased in a 
transparent tube, is encircled by sharks 

Showtimes for Search for the Great Sharks are 
10-30 and 11:30 a.m., 1:30 and 330 p.m. daily 
To the Limit, an exploration of the adaptation of 
the human mind and body to conditioning for out- 
standing physical performance, is shown at 1^:30. 
2:30. and 4.30 pm 

On Friday and Saturday at 6:00 and 7:30 pm 
Search for the Great Sharks is shown on a double 
bill with To the Lim,t. Schedules and prices are 
subject to change without notice. Call (111) iw- 
5650 for further information. 
Admission (Participating and Higher Members): 
Adults- $4 single feature; $5.50 double feature 
Children $2 single feature; $3 double feature 



Museum Notes 



Hours 

Exhibition Halls 

Mon -Thurs. & Sun 10:00 am -545 p.m. 

Fri.&Sat. '" '■ -8 45 p.m. 

The Museum Shop 

Mon. -Thurs. & Sun 10.00 a m -5 45 p 

&Sat. . 10:00 am -7:45 i 

The Junior Shop 

Mon-Fn 10:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun 1000 am -545 p.m. 

The Museum Library 

Tues-hi ....11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

The Discovery Room 

Passes are distributed at me first-floor informa- 
tion desk beginning at 1 1 45 am Ages 5-10. 
Children must be accompanied by an adult 
Closed on holidays and weekdays. 

Sat & Sun Noon-4:30 p.m. 

The Natural Science Center 

For children of all ages and their families. 
Closed on Mondays and holidays. 

Tues-Fri .10:30 a.m.-l 2:30 p ... 

& 2:00-4:30 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun 1.00-4:30 p ... 

Museum Dining 

Diner Saurus Fast Service Eatery 

Daily 11:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m. 

Garden Cafe 

Reservations. (212) 769-5865 

Lunch- Mon-Fn ll:30a.m.-3:30pm 

Dinner. Fri. & Sat 5 30-7:30 p.m. 

Brunch. Sat & Sun 11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

W ^ GSUm 3 00-8:00 pm 

Sat Noon-8:00 1 1 ... 

Sun. & most holidays Noon-5:00 p.m 



Snack Carts (at 77th Street & on the first floor of 
the Roosevelt Memorial Hall) 
Sat. & Sun 11 00 a.m.-4:00 p.m 

Entrances 

During Museum hou orscan ei 

building through the 77th S *« 

parking lot entrance (81st Stre< 
sevelt Memorial Hall enri an and 

Central Park West) Visitors attending pro- 
grams after hours can enter the building 
through the driveway entrance at 79th 
Street and Central Park West. 

Parking 

/"he Museum "s parking lot is located on if 1st 
Strict between Central Park West andColumi 
Avenue Space is limited and available on a first 
co< served basis, fees are $12 for cars and 

$]] ,, The lot is open from 9:30a m 

10 p.m on Sundaj) through Thursday and from 
9 JOa m to midnighl on Friday ami Saturday 

Hertz Manhattan, located one block au 
the Museum al 210 West 7 
Broadway and lam), o// 

discounts to Members on Monday 
Friday they receive a $2 dlscoun 
prices and on Saturday and Sunday Memb< 
receive a $3 discount 

Call the Membership Ofiue at (212 
for information about alternative ;• 

Birthday Parties 

Theme parties for young Members 5-1 « 
old are two hours long and held 
Wednesdays, at 4:00 p.m. on Fridays, and al 
11 00a.m. oi ' fOp m on weekends rhe group 
should be no fewer than 10 and no more than 

20 The fee is $275 rl"-- $* ' P ei ch " d ' "" 
includes all materials. Juice, ice cream, and favor 
bags. The cake is not in. luded.J Call (212) 769 
5606 for further information 



Happenings at the Hayden 



Lectures 

Frontiers in Astronomy and Astrophysics 

On Monday. May 23, at 7:30 p.m.. David Levy 
of the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory of the Uni- 
versity of Arizona will present an illustrated talk. 
"The Great Jupiter-Comet Crash of 1994 " Levy is 
a co-discoverer of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9. which 
is due to hit Jupiter in late July He will discuss his 
findings and the comet's collision course 

The Jupiter-comet crash will be further discussed 
on Monday. June 6. at 7:30 p.m. Kevin Zahnle of 
the NASA Ames Research Center will talk about the 
significance of the collision. For ticket information 
call (212) 769-5900 

These lectures are part of the Frontiers in As- 
tronomy and Astrophysics series. Tickets are S>6 
for Participating and Higher Members and $8 for 
non-Members. For information about ticket avail- 
ability call (212) 769-5900. Use the coupon at right 
to order tickets , 

On Thursday. May 5. at 7 30 p.m., meteorologist 
Joe Rao will present an illustrated talk about the 
May 10 solar eclipse. The lecture will take place m 
the Planetarium s Sky Theater. Tickets are $6 for 
Participating and Higher Members and $8 for non- 
Members and will be available at the Planetarium 
box office beginning at 6:30 p.m. on the , night of 
the talk. For additional information call [III) iw 
5900 
Solar Eclipse Day 

On Tuesday. May 10. weather permitting, the 
Planetarium will set up telescopes pytside tor sate 
viewing of the solar eclipse. For additional informa- 
tion, call (212) 769-5900 

Sky Shows 

Orion Rendezvous... A Star Trek* 

Voyage of Discovery 

Climb aboard the starsh.p Antares for a cos., 
journey. Actor LeVar Burton joins the crew as Lieu- 
tenant Commander Geordi La Forge, the character 
he plays on Star Trek. The Next Generation 



Enter the twenty-fourth century and learn about the 
variety of stars in the universe. 
Showtimes: 

Mon-Fri ■ 1 K? 0a ? d3 ^ 3 . 0P ' , Si 

Sat 1 1 00 a.m. (except for May 7 and duni 

100 2:00, 3:00. 4:00, and 5:00 p.m. 

Sun 1.00, 2;00. 300. 400. and 500 p ... 

Admission is $4 for adult Participating and 
Higher Members and $2 for Members children 
aaes 2 to 12. For additional information and non- 
M'embers- prices, call (212) 769-5100 Please note 
thai prices and schedule are subject to change with- 
out notice. 

Children's Shows 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers. Children sing along with .mages ot 
their favorite Sesame Street Muppets as they learn 
about rainbows, the phases of the moon sunsets, 
and stars. Sat., May 7. at 1030 a.m.. and Sat 
June 4 at 10:30 and 11:45 a.m. For prices and 
ticket information, call (212) 769-5900 

Robots in Space features Lucasf.lm s R2D2 and 
C-3PO- and has been created especially for chil- 
dren ages 7 to 12. Together with a live host, these 
famous space robots take children on a tour of the 
universe. See how satellites and probes - the real 
space robots - help us learn about worlds near and 
far. Journey from the earth to other planets and 
distant black holes. Sat., May 7, and Sat. July 9. at 
1 1 45 am For prices and ticket information call 
(212)769-5900. 

Exhibition 

Space Places: A Photographic Art Exhibit 

The Planetarium presents an exciting 
photographic display, Space Places, by worjd- 
renowned photographer Roger Ressmeyer The 
exhibition is a collection of photographs incorporat- 
ing the human, mystical, and technical sidesd 
soace with an emphasis on internationally strategic 
daces The photographs highlight the latest space 
technologies as well as the historical and mon... 
tal centers of the international space age. On dis- 
play through May 15. 



Laser Shows 

Journey into another dimension where lasei vlsu 
als and rock music combine to create a dazzlini | I I 
experience of sight and sound. Shi 
on Fridays and Saturdays at 7:00. 8:30. and 10:00 
p m For prices and show schedule, telephone 
(212)769-5100. 

It's always a good idea to call before visit 
ing the Planetarium, since prices, programs, 
and showtimes are subject to change without 
notice. For general Planetarium information, 
call (212) 769-5100. 



Lecture: "The Great Jupiter-Comet Crash 
of 1994." Monday M ; " i"" 

Number of M<- il $6 

(no more than 4. please): — 
Number of non-Membc . til kets at $8:_ 
Total amount enclosed: — 



Name:. 



Address: 
City: 



.State: 



.Zip:. 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: _ 

Please make check payable I 
Planetarium and mail with a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope '^den 

Planetarium. O West at 81st Street. 

New York. NY 10024 51' 

Please note that ticket orders 
availability and car. processed with 

telephone number and stamped, self-addre 
envelope Do not include ticket requests or 
checks for American Museum programs. 






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For Participating a 



nd Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



Vol. 19. No. 7 July/August 1994 







C NYZ-. 



Baby Belugas 

Thursday, August 25 

7:00 p.m. 

^MenS^llOfornon-Members 



The first beluga whales born in 
captivity to have survived beyond the 
first few weeks of life made their ap- 
pearance three years ago at New 
York's Aquarium for Wildlife Conser- 
vation. The two males were joined by 
a baby female last summer, and the 
young belugas should survive for more 
than 20 years. 



At the Members' program Baby 

Belugas the aquarium's director. 

Louis Garibaldi, will show a fascinat- 

inq videotape of a beluga birtlv 

Garibaldi will discuss the importance 

of breeding as a conservation measure 

and related issues. 
Approximately 65.000 belugas 

roam the arctic waters of Canada. 



Greenland, and Alaska in a number of 
isolated groups, and the spec.es is not 

considered endangered; however, 
beluqas in some regions face tremen- 
dous threats from toxic pollution and 
subsistence hunting The aquarium s 
baby belugas offer a unique opportu- 
nity to learn more about the species 
Observations of their births and devel- 



opment will help other aquariums 
establish breeding populations andas 

Garibaldi notes. "The more wc know 
about a n .he more we 

when s..n..-tl.ii.g goes wrong m the 

Wild . 

Use the July/August Members 
programs coupon on page 3 to regis- 
ter for the program. 



Empires Beyond 
the Great Wall 

More than 3,500 years of Mongo- 
lian history and culture are traced at a 
coming exhibition Empires Beyond 
the Great Wall. The Heritage o) 
Gengh.s Khan will feature scores ot 
artworks, many of which ^eondxs- 
play for the first time in the Wesr see 
page 4 for details about the exhibition 
and a related Members' program. 




Royal Tombs 
of Sipan 

The current Gallery 3 exhibition 
features gold and silver items from the 
richest graves ever excavated by 
archeoloq.sts in the Americas These 
glittering artifacts offer valuable i in- 
sights into the lives of the Moch. 
who dominated the culture of Peru 
northern coast dunng the first millen- 
nium AD. See page 3 for deta,ls of 
Members' tours of the exhibition 




Members' 
Day Trip to the 

Croton 
Reservoir 

Thursday, August 4 
8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 

Sidney Horenstcin, the 
Museum's coordinator of 
environmental public 
programs, will host a trip to 
Croton Dam. Completed in 
i '1)7. the dam was the 
world's highest at that time. 
Participants will visit a park 
adjacent to the dam and see 
the spillway. Horenstein will 
discuss the dam's geological 
setting and environmental 
issues affecting it 

Members will also see the 
new $80-million gatehouse 
that controls the water's flow 
into aqueducts and visit the 
Cross River Dam. 

The dam is located in 
Croton-on-Hudson in West- 
chester County. Transpor- 
tation will be by bus from the 
Museum, and participants 
should be sure to wear com- 
fortable clothes and bring a 
bag lunch. Tickets are $50 
and available only by mail to 
Participating and Higher 
Members Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register, and please 
note that the trip is appropri- 
ate for participants ages 16 
and older. 




Members' Day Trip 

How Water 
Works 

Thursday, July 28 
8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 

Explore the city's water 
supply system, a marvel of 
modern-day engineering thai 
provides the best-quality mu- 
nicipal water in the world 

Members will begin the trip 
with an extensive tour of the 
North River Pollution Control 
Plant and then travel to the 
Bronx for a tour of the 
Jerome Park Reservoir and 
Pilot Filtration Plant, where 
they'll view part of the Third 
Water Tunnel and descend 
more than 200 feet below 
Van Cortlandt Park to ob- 
serve the internal water 
works. The trip will conclude 
at Hillview Reservoir. 

Representatives from the 
Department of Environmental 
Protection will be on hand at 
all of the sites to explain as- 
pects of the system, and 
Sidney Horenstein, the Mu- 
seum's coordinator of envi- 
ronmental public programs. 
will lead the tours from start 
to finish 

Tickets are $50 each and 
available only to Participating 
and Higher Members. The 
fees for this program are for 
transportation and educa- 
tional presentations only 
there is no admission charge 
for tours of the sites. No food 
will be available on the \< 
so be sure to bring a bag 
lunch and beverages. 

Use the coupon on page 5 



to register for the trip, which 
is appropriate for participants 
ages 16 and older, and please 
note that tickets are available 
only by mail. 



From Quarry 
to Quonset 

Thursday, August 18 
8:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. 



Members will see how 
granite is quarried and fash- 
ioned into handsome slabs on 
a day trip to Stony Creek 
Granite Quarry and Quonset. 
Rhode Island They'll Morally 
follow the entire process, 
beginning with the extracts hi 
of the raw matenals from the 
earth and ending with pol- 
ished granite 

Sidney Horenstein. the 
Museum's coordinator of 
environmental public pro 
grams will host the trip 
which begins with a bus ride 
to Connecticut's Stony Creek 
Granite Quarry. Visitors will 
see how the quarry's pink 
granite is excavated with both 
traditional and modern tech- 
niques, and they'll leam about 
its geological setting. 

Members will travel along 
with the stone blocks from 
the quarry to a plant in Quon- 
set Point. Rhode Island. 
There, they'll watch as the 
blocks are cut and shaped 
and a variety of finishes are 
applied to the stone. 

The trip will take place rain 
or shine Partli ipants are 
advised to wear sturdy shi >es 
that can get muddy and wet 
during the walks through the 
quarry and plant rickets are 
$65 and available only to 
Participating and Higher 
Members. Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register for the trip, 
which is appropriate for par- 
tic ipants ages 16 and older, 
and please note that tickets 
are available only by mall 



Members' 
Day Trip to the 

NY Botanical 
Garden 

Wednesday, July 6 
9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

One of America's foremost 
public gardens, the New York 
Botanical Garden features 
250 acres of dramatic rock 
outcroppings. a river and 
cascading waterfall, and 16 
specialty gardens. 

Participants will travel by 
bus from the Amerit an Mu- 
seum to the Bronx, where 
they II begin with a guided 
toui of the garden's extensive 
for. i the 90-minute 

tour. Memberscane.il thell 
bag lunches at pi< ok Kihles or 
purchase lunch at the historic 
sin ilf Mill Kiwi terra e Cafe, 
an 1840 New York City land- 
mark that houses a cafeteria 
with .in i lutdooi terrace. 

Aftei lunch M- in 

.lore on theii own until the 
departure time of 3 00 p m 



Among the garden's many 
horticultural attractions are 
gardens of roses, perennials, 
and rocks, as well as 
. .iii standing collections of 
daylilles, orchids, hardy fems, 
flowering trees, conifers, and 
pines A tram, which runs 
every half-hour, brings riders 
back to the main garden 

This trip is appropriate for 
participants ages 16 and 
older Tickets are $40 and 

.lable only to Participating 
and Higher Members. Use 
ill, coupon on page 5 to 
register, and please note that 
tickets are available only by 
mail. 



Members' 
Day Trip to 

Snug Harbor 

and the 

Staten Island 
Zoo 

Thursday, July 14 
8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 

A day trip to Staten Island 
takes Members to Snug Har- 
bor Cultural Center for a look 
at its historical features and to 
the zoo, where they'll meet 
some members of the famous 
reptile collections. 

At Snug Harbor Cultural 
Center participants will take a 
guided tour that examines the 
adaptive reuse and restoration 
of the center's 28 historic 
buildings. These nineteenth- 
century Greek Revival, 
Beaux-Arts. Second Empire, 
and Italianate buildings are 
used today by local cultural 
groups as centers for visual 
and performing arts. 

The tours will also look at 
two current art exhibitions. 
New Island Views, in the 
Newhouse Center for Con- 
temporary Art, features art- 
work from the Staten Island 
community. The Snug Harbor 
Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition, 
an annual event that has been 
acclaimed as one of the best 
in the country, brings 
together the site-specific, 
large-scale works of contem- 
porary artists 

After a picnic lunch on the 
center's grounds Members 
will arrive at the Staten Island 
Zoo at 2.00 p.m. A zoo 
staffer will offer a brief history 
of the zoo, introduce the new 
Tropical Forest Wing, and 
take Members for a preview 
of the East African Savannah 
Wing, which is under con- 
struction. They'll also take in 
highlights of the world- 
famous Reptile Wing and 
have some hands-on interac- 
tions with a few of the fasci- 
nating but nonvenomous 
resident reptiles The guided 
tour will last about an hour, 
and participants will have an 
hour and a half in which to 
'lore the zoo on their own. 
I ii kets are $45 and avail- 
able only by mail to Panic i 
Dating and Higher Members. 
Use the coupon on page 5 to 
register, and please note that 
thi appropriate for 

>ic ipants ages 16 and 
old. 



Members' Walking Tour 

The Cathedral 
of St. John 
the Divine 

Wednesday, July 20 
10:00 a.m. 
and 2:00 p.m. 

SOLD OUT 

Historian David Garrard 
Lowe will lead Members on 
an extensive tour of the 
world s largest Gothic cathe- 
dral, which is located on Am- 
sterdam Avenue at West 
112th Street. 

Although the Cathedral of 
St. John the Divine is over 
100 years old, one-third of 
the structure has yet to be 
built. Lowe, who is professor 
of architectural history at the 
New York School of Interior 
Design and director of Its 
gallery, will focus on promi- 
nent features of the cathe- 
dral's design and construction 
history and its stained-glass 
windows, statuary, and exte- 
rior stonework. He'll also talk 
about the prominent New 
Yorkers associated with the 
cathedral. 

Tickets for the tours, which 
are two hours long and ap- 
propriate for participants 
ages 16 and older, are $20 
and available only to Partici- 
pating and Higher Members. 



Members' Walking 
Tour 

Back Streets 
of the 
Seaport 
Museum 

Tuesday, July 12 
Noon and 3:00 p.m. 

The city's transformation 
from forests and farmlands to 
asphalt jungle is explored on 
a walking tour of the South 




Walking tours of 
St. John's 

Street Seaport. Members will 
hear about the area's social 
history and architecture from 
a representative of the South 
Street Seaport Museum, an 
institution that's been instru- 
mental in the preservation, 
restoration, and interpretation 
of the district. 

Participants will discover 
old New York, the city that 
rose to world prominence in 
the nineteenth century. The 
walking tours will board the 
Peking, the largest sailing 
ship in the museum's collec- 
tion, for a brief tour that will 
profile historic ship preserva- 
tion, sailors' lives at sea, and 
the extraordinary contribution 
of maritime enterprise to the 
growth of American com- 
merce and culture. 

The tours will begin at the 
Visitors' Center with an ori- 
entation session; the walking 
portion of the tours will last 
approximately 50 minutes. 
Tickets are $15 and available 
only by mail to Participating 
and Higher Members. Use 
the coupon on page 5 to 
register, and please note that 
the tours are appropriate for 
ages 13 and older. 




ISSN 0194-6110 

Vol. 19. No. 7 
July/August 1994 

Donna Bell — Editor 

Sheila Greenberg — Manager of Membership Services 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Yolanda Loften — Fulfillment Coordinator 

Robert Jahn — Program Coordinator 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and Higher 
Members of the American Museum of Natural History, is 
published monthly September through June, bimonthly July and 
August. Publication offices are at Natural History magazine. 
American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 
79th Street. New York. NY 10024-5192. Telephone: (212) 
769-5606. Subscriptions: $50 a year for Participating 

interchip; $100 a year for Contributor Membership. 
© 1994 American Museum of Natural History. Second-class 
postage paid at New York, NY. Postmaster: Please send address 
changes to: Rotunda, Membership Office. American Museum o 
Natural History. Central Park West at 79th Street. New York 
NY 10024-5192 

Pnnted by Waldon Press. Inc.. New York 



Members' 
Day Trip to the 

Raptor Trust 

Tuesday, August 2 
9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. 



At New Jersey's Raptor 
Trust injured and orphaned 
birds are rescued, nursed, and 
returned to the wild. Mem- 
bers can tour the facility, 
which is dedicated to the 
preservation and well-being of 
birds of prey and houses 
many of the area's resident 
breeding species, including 
red-tailed hawks, American 
kestrels, screech owls, and 
great homed owls 

The majority of the center's 
residents are orphaned 
nestling songbirds, who need 
almost constant care to stay 
healthy. The guided tour of 
the Raptor Trust's outdoor 
facilities will show how the 
orphaned birds are raised 
with techniques designed to 
avoid dependence on humans 
and give the young a reason- 
able chance of survival upon 
release. 

Transportation between the 
Museum and the center in 
Millington, New Jersey, will 
be by bus. Be sure to dress 
comfortably and bring a bag 
lunch. Tickets, which are 
$40, are available only by 
mail to Participating and 
Higher Members. Use the 
coupon on page 5 to register 
and please note that the trip 
is appropriate for participants 
ages 8 and older. 



Ground, the city's cemetery 
for African-Americans, in use 
from 1691 to 1800. 

Tickets are $20 and avail- 
able only by mail to Partici- 
pating and Higher Members. 



Members' 
Guided Tours off 

Sipan 

Participating and Higher 
Members can take guided 
tours of the Gallery 3 exhibi- 
tion Royal Tombs of Sipan. 
Volunteer Highlights Tour 
guides will escort Members 
through the gallery and talk 
about the stunning artifacts 
on display, which were found 
in the richest pre-Columbian 
tomb ever excavated by 
archeologists. 

The tours will take place on 
Friday. July 22. at 6:00 (sold 
out). 6:30, 7:00. and 7:30 
p.m. Tickets are $3 and avail- 
able only to Participating and 
Higher Members. (This spe- 
cial exhibition has an admis- 
sion fee of $4 for adult 
Members and $2 for Mem- 
bers' children ages 2 to 12. 
Non-Members' admissions 
are $5 for adults and $2.50 
for children.) 

Tours last about an hour 
and are appropriate for par- 
ticipants ages 13 and older. 
Use the coupon at right to 
register. 



Members' 
Walking Tour 

Five Points 

and 

Chinatown 

Tuesday, July 26 
Noon and 4:00 p.m. 

SOLD OUT 

Five Points — which took 
its name from the five comers 
at the intersection of Baxter. 
Worth, and Park streets — 
was a notorious slum in the 
nineteenth century. Today it's 
part of Chinatown, and Mem- 
bers can join James P. Shen- 
ton. a professor of history at 
Columbia University, for a 
tour of the neighborhood and 
a look at how the city is buili 

The tours will begin at the 
First Cemetery of the Span- 
ish-Portuguese Synagogue in 
the City of New York, which 
predates both Chinatown and 
Five Points, and then pass by 
the second-oldest Catholic 
church in New York, St. 
James Church, where the 
Ancient Order of Hibernians 
was founded in 1844 Partici- 
pants will traverse Chatham 
Square, formerly the edge of 
Kleine Deutschland, whn h 

win the 1840s with 
first German [mmigratii ins to 
survey the African Burial 




Anthropomorphized 
spider from Sipan 



Members' Walking 
Tour 

The 

Revolution in 
New York 

Tuesday, August 30 
3:00 and 5:30 p.m. 

The British seized New 
York City in the summer of 
1776. and they stayed in 
control for seven years and 
destroyed one-third of the city 
during their occupation. His- 
torian Peter Laskowich will 
walk with Members around 
some of New York's land- 
mark buildings and point out 
vestiges of the city's role in 
the Revolutionary War. 

Tickets are $20 and avail 

able only by mail to Part: 
pating and Higher Memh 
Use the coupon on page 5 to 
register for the 90-minute 
tours, and please note that 
they are appropriate for par- 
ticipants ages 16 and older 



Members' 
Day Trip to a 

Pennsylvania 
Coal Mine 

Saturday, Sept. 24 
7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. 
$60, and open only to 
Participating and 
Higher Members 

Members can explore some 
of the Northeast's major geo- 
logical provinces with Sidney 
Horenstein, the Museum's 
coordinator of environmental 
public programs. 

They'll board a bus at the 
Museum and travel across 
New Jersey to the spectacular 
Delaware Water Gap, where 
Horenstein will describe the 
water gap's origins and geol- 
ogy. The journey continues 
across the Pennsylvania 
Appalachians, where the 
group will enter both subsur- 
face and open-pit mines on 
coal trains. Retired coal min- 
ers will be on hand to discuss 
their experiences. 

The trip will include a tour 
of a "ghost" town that is 
being evacuated because the 
coal mine beneath the town is 
on fire and represents a haz- 
ard to residents. 

Tickets are $60 and avail- 
able only to Participating and 
Higher Members ages 16 and 
older. Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register for the trip, 
and please note that tickets 
are available only by mail. 

Members' 
Walking Tour 

The Jewish 
i Lower 
East Side 

Wednesday, 
August 24 
11:00 a.m. 
and 3:00 p.m. 

The Jewish Lower East 
Side. A Heritage Tour takes 
Members on a walk around 
this historic neighborhood to 
explore the communities es- 
tablished by East European, 
Sephardic, and German Jews 
A costumed actor will lead the 
tour, showing participants the 
Lower East Side at the turn of 
the century as seen through 
the eyes of the immi< 
Scheinberg family. Stops on 
the tour Include the Jewish 
Daily Forward Building, the 
Educational Alliance, and the 
Rabbi Jacob Joseph Yeshiva 

This walking toUl Is pre- 
sented in cooperation with 
the Tenement Museum 
Chartered in 1988. them' 
seum seeks to promote toler- 
ance and bring a historical 
perspective to the variety 
immigrant experiences on the 
Lower East Side 

The two-hour tours are 
appropriate for participants 
ages 13 and older and will 
take place rain or shine I 
ets are $20 and available only 
to Participating and Higher 
Members Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register, and please 
note that tickets are available 
only by mail. 



July/August 

Members' 
Programs Coupon 



Name: 



Address: 
City: 



.State: 



.Zip: 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category:. 



Total amount enclosed:. 



Please make check (if applicable) payable to the American 
Museum of Natural History and in.nl with a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope to: July/All 
Members' Programs. Membership Office-. American 
Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th 
Street. New York. NY 10024-5192 Telephone 
reservations are not accepted. No refunds or 
exchanges. 



Unless otherwise indicated, no more than eight 
tickets may be ordered for a program. Participat- 
ing Members are entitled to four tickets per 
program at the Members' price. Higher Members 
are entitled to six tickets, and Associate Members 
are entitled to one ticket. 

Members' Guided Tours of Sipan. Friday fi tly 22 

Please Indli ate a first, second, and third choice ol Hmi \ 

6:30 pm. 7:00 p.m. 7:30p.m 

Number of Members' tickets at $3 

(no more than 2. please): 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Baby Belugas. Thursday. August 25, 7:00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $7: 

Number of additional tickets at $10: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 



Aussie Porta Puppets. Sunday. September 11, 1:30 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $6: 

Number of additional tickets at $8: 

Number of free grandpar. vts 

(1 free ticket for each purchase): 

Total amount enclosed for program: 



Stories and Songs for the New Year 

Tuesday. September 13, 7:00 p.m 
Number of Members' tic I L5:___ 

Number of additional ii< ! !0 

Total amount enclose rogram _ 



Genghis Khan. Thursday, September 22, 7:00 | 

Number of Memb. il $7: 

Number of additional tic I 10:__ 

iMiint enclosed for program: — 



Birth Control in the Ancient World 

Thursday. September 29. 7:00p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $8: 

Number of additional tickets at $12: 

: amount enclosed for program: 



NOTE: Orders received less than ten days before 
show dates will be held for pick-up at the door on 
the day of the program if tickets are still available. If 
an event is sold out. you will be advised in writing or 
by phone and your check will be returned. 



Members' Walking Tour of the 

Financial District 

and the Federal Reserve Bank 

Friday, September 16 
11:00 a.m.-2:30 p.m. 
$25, and open only 
to Participating and 
Higher Members 
Appropriate for 
ages 16 and up 



See the places where peo- 
ple try to save theii money 
and their souls on a down- 
town walking tour that looks 
at Manhattan s most secure 
bank, Us oldest church, and 

other points of historical and 
architectural interest 

H„, tours will make a stop 
at Trinity Church, whose St. 
Paul's Chapel was built in 
1766, making it not only the 

oldest church in Manhattan 
but also the island's oldest 



public building in continuous 
Among the prominent 
Americans who have atten- 
ded the church are George 
Washington, who worshiped 
in St. Paul's Chapel after his 
1789 inauguration and re- 
nted a parishioner during 
following months when 
New York was the nation s 

capital. 

The tour will also visit the 
Federal Reserve Bank of New 
York at 33 Liberty Street. 
which stores a significant part 
of the world's gold reserves. 
The massive rusticated walls 
of the bank, which were de- 
signed by York and Sawyer 
and built from 1919 to 1924. 

were constructed of stone in 
two colors to symbolize the 
strength of the Federal Re- 



serve system and the impreg- 
nability of the building. Visi- 
tors will be offered an 
overview of the bank s opera- 
tions and its role in the econ- 
omy, and they'll visit the 
currency processing division. 

the protection area, and tne 
gold vault 

Members will be accompa- 
nied by Joyce Gold, an expe- 
rienced tour guide who leads 
history walks around Manhat- 
tan Gold, who has a masters 
degree in metropolitan studies 
from NYU. teaches popular 
courses on Manhattan history 
at the New School for Social 
Research and NYU. 

Use the coupon on page o 
to register for the tour, and 
please note that tickets are 
available only by mail. 



Birth Control 

in the Ancient World 

Thursday, September 29 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann ™ eatc I 19 for no n-Members 

$8 for Members, $1* « or nou 



Genghis Khan: Hero or Villain? 

Thursday, September 22 

7:00 p.m. 

^MMW for non-Members 



Nearly 800 years after his 
dea th Genghis Khan remains 
alarg.-, than-llfe figure. Opin- 
ions aboui his character and 
historical significance vary 

Westerners tend 

i gard him as a blood- 
thlrsty barbarian Chinese 
historians credit him with the 

Pax Mongolia wht< hpro 

, „ . ho, 

go l . nationallsn 

led by a cult ofG 
• himas I briUlanf 

milltar! commandei ol all 

time ."',1 lh. " i '' 1 "' 

Mongolia 

The life and careei of the 
warrioi king will be examined 
at the Members program 
Genghis Khan HeroorVll 
lour' The program Is pre- 
sented in conjunction with the 



exhibition Empires Beyond 
the Great Wall: The Her- 
itageo/Gi-M'j'"^ Khan 
which opt ns in Gallery 77 in 
Sent. I"'-' (see the related 
feature below). Historian Mor- 
,, Rossabi Willi ... mine the 
enduring legacy created by 
Genghis and his sons-, tl n 

,,■11,., i inextricably linked 

" 

cessors. 

including his renowned grand- 
European ei i 
d craftsmen — including 

Marco Polo — thru firsl 
portunity to journey as f.. 

Chin.' In turn As,,, a goods 
yeled to Europe along 
ira van trails, .md the ensu- 
ing W< Stem demand for these 

produd " ed 

the search lor a sea route to 

Asia. 



On his way to the peaceful 
era of international exchange, 
however, Genghis unleashed 
torrents ol death and destruc- 
i ! lis conquest and rule 
i • nfe with similar contra- 
dictions. An illiterate and 
uneducated nomad, he or- 
dered the development of the 
Mongol written language, 
sorted cr. and 

in d patronized a ' 
of religions 

Morris Rossabl Is currently 
professor of history at C 
University of New York and 
adjunct professor at Columbia 
University He is the author 
of Khubilai Khan HisLife 
and Times (University of 
California Press. 1988) and 

Voyager from Xanadu (Ko- 
dansha. 1992). 

Use the coupon on page 3 
to register. 



Empires Beyond the Great Wall: 
The Heritage of Genghis Khan 



An unprecedented exhibi- 
tion thai traces some 3.500 
years of Mongolian history 
and culture, Empires Beyond 
the Great Wall The Her 

ifugeo/ Genghis Khan will 
feature more than 200 works 
of art. many of which are 

ent discoveries and are on 
display for the fust time m the 

West 

Inner Mongolia, an auto- 
nomous region of the P< 
pie's Republic of Chin. ». Is 
one of the world' s final arche 
ological frontiers A series of 
, ordinary discoveries over 

the past four decades has 



revealed to Western Silk 
Route archeologists the splen- 
dors of the region's ancient 

i ivilization. 
rhe exhibition's displays ol 

gold, bronze, ceramic, wood, 
and textile objects represent 
cultures that flourished from 
2.000 BC through the four- 
teenth century AD. They 
Illustrate the complex and 
often ferocious interactions of 
the steppe peoples and their 
sedentary neighbors to the 
south and west. 

Members can attend a pn- 
vate viewing of the exhibition 
on Thursday. September 22. 



from 6-.00 to 9.00 p.m. The 
private viewing, which is pre- 
sented in conjunction with a 
special Members' program is 
free and open only to Partu I 
pating and Higher Members. 
Your valid membership card 
is your ticket of admission. 

Empires Beyond the 
Great Wall: The Heritage of 
Genghis Khan was organized 
by the Natural History Mu- 
seum of Los Angeles County 

ollaboration with the Inner 
Mongolia Museum of China 
The exhibition will be on 

play in Gallery 77 through 
November 27 




Alas, Persephone ate six 
kernels of a pomegranate 
during her sojourn in the 
underworld, so she was 
obliged to return to Hades tor 
six months each year. Thus 
we have six months of harsh 
weather while she's gone and 
her mother, the goddess of 
agriculture, weeps, followed 
by six months of blooming 
warmth upon Persephone s 

return. 

This familiar Greek myth, a 
metaphor for the cycles of 
the seasons, also refers to an 
ancient form of contracep- 
tion According to Galen, the 

foremost physician in classical 
antiquity, pomegranates are 
an effective contraceptive, 
along with willow and date 

palm. 

The ancients possessed a 
wealth of knowledge about 
plant life than enabled them 
ie herbal methods of I 
m-oI This knowledge w 
!,y the time of the Renais- 
sance, and the story of ar- 
chaic forms of contraception 
is only now beginning to 
emerge. At the Mem' 
program Birth Control [n 
the Ancient World histonan 
John Riddle will discuss 
what's been recovered of this 
lost knowledge. 

The ancient Egyptians were 



Cyrene coin 

of third century 

showing woman 

and contraceptive 

plant 

practicing botanical birth 
control long before the 
Greeks and Romans; a pa- 
pyrus from 1550-1500 BC 
lists acacia gum among othei 
abortifacients, and modem 
studies have found acacia to 
be spermatocidal. Other 
plants used in classical times 
as contraceptives or abortifa- 
cients include pennyroyal, 
artemisia, myrrh, and rue. 
The seeds of Queen Anne s 
lace or wild carrot, were 
declared by Hippocrates to 
prevent and terminate preg- 
nancy when taken orally. 
Recent laboratory expen- 
ments with rats confirm this 
assertion, and a few contem- 
porary women in rural areas 
of North Carolina and India 
eat Queen Anne's lace seeds 
to reduce fertility — just as 
women did 2.000 years ago 

John Riddle will discuss 
these and other 1 brth- 

control aqents and the possi- 
ble reasons that they have 
faded from common usage. A 
professor of histoi vat North 
Carolina State University. 
Riddle is the author of Con- 
traception and Abortion 
from the Ancient World to 
the Renaissance (Harvard 
University Press). 

Use the coupon on page • 
to register. 



Aussie Porta Puppets 

Sunday, September 11 

1:30 p.m. 

Under Theater mM . 

$6 for Members, $8 for non-Members 
Appropriate for ages 3-7 
Grandparents free with grandchildren 




Kate Kangaroo, Cornelius 
Crocodile, and Wally Wom- 
bat, three of the many furry 
stars of the Aussie Porta 
Puppets, dwell near a bill- 
abong in the outback of Aus- 
tralia. They tour the globe 
with their creator. Australian 
puppeteer Margot Siemer, 
telling tales from the billabong 
and teaching children about 
conservation and the environ- 
ment, problem-solving and 
self-esteem, and the unique 
animals from Down Under. 
Siemer. a former kinder- 
garten teacher, grew up on a 
sheep station in the outback 



of West Australia with emus 
and kangaroos as pets Her 
performances combine her 
interest in puppetry and sto- 
rytelling with her love of 
wildlife. The Aussie Porta 
Puppets have performed 
their original stories at 
schools, colleges, libraries, 
museums, and theaters 
around the world. 

This program is a Septem- 
ber Senior Special — each i 
grandparent will be admitted 
to the program free when 
accompanied by a paying 
grandchild. Use the coupon 
on page 3 to register 



Celebrating 
Our Mistakes 

Stories and Songs 
for the New Year 

Tuesday, September 13 
7:00 p.m. 
Main Auditorium 
$15 for Members, 
$20 for non-Members 




World-known rabbi and 
folksinger Shlomo Carlebach 
and master storyteller Diane 
Wolkstein will return to the 
Museum for a special pro- 
gram commemorating the 
Jewish New Year 

They believe that Yom 
Kippur is the most human ot 
holidays, for it is human to 

make mistakes. If we have the 

courage to admit them, our 

m.stakes can be the source ot 

our growth and compassion. 

Carlebach and Wolkstein will 

trade true-life stories as well 

as Hasidic stories of wisdom 

and humor. , 

With his music, stones, and 

retelling of Hasidic teachings, 

Carlebach touches the hearts 
of his listeners He has com- 
posed thousands of melodies 
that are sung throughout the 



Shlomo Carlebach 



world, recorded 25 albums 
and published two songbooks. 
"His appeal,'' reported Life 
magazine, "is as wide as his 
heart and as great as his 
soul " He is the rabbi at Car- 
lebach Shul in New York 

City (t „ A 

Diane Wolkstein is a gifted 

storyteller who performs 
epics as well as fairytales at 
universities, libraries, theaters, 
and festivals. She has written 
17 books of folklore, includ- 
ing Inanno and The First 
Love Stories, and has made 
12 recordings She was re- 
cently featured on Charles 
KuraultV CBS News Sunday 

Morning." which profiled her 
25 years of storytelling, writ- 
ing, and teaching 

Use the coupon on page ^ 
to register. 



1994 Margaret Mead 
Film Festival 



Representations of shamanism and 
familial relationships .will be among 
[he themes of the 1994 Margaret 
Mead Film Festival. which will take 
place from Wednesday .October 12 
through Tuesday, October 18. Th.s 
years retrospective ^' ebrat * s '** 
works of Richard Gordon and Carma 
Hinton! whose films on China;- 
been featured throughout the festi 
va Ts history. Gordon and Hinton will 
showsomZf their earliest films as 
well as their recent works in 

Pr F^£s-Tl.eH«nter W aliStorv 

will be among the ^"'."^ht 
films. A fascinating look at theworK 
ofa egendary stunt actress whose 
films dominated the Indian box 
office in the 30s and 40s, Fearless 
offers a look at Indian cinema and 
notifies of the period. 
P if you'd like to add your name to 

the festival's mailing list, call (212) 

769-5305. 




Tours and Dav TH PS "«*!^£#S£ The 

day trips From Quarry >o Q«°"*^ h J t0(e P n lshvd . How 
Cro.on Resercoir. Botamcol Garden b( ^ Co0 , 



Name(s) of program(s) 




Numb er o, tickets and price (p^Jnto-^^ 

if more than one): 



Total amount enclosed 




1 Daytime telephone: _ 

i 

J Membership category 

i 

! Please make check payable |»°^^££d. staged 
! Natural History and ™il with a sen bership office. 

I envelope to: Tours one lDa\ ^Tr.ps. ^ West at 

! American Museum of Na^ralri.|t°w 
79th Street. New York. NY 10024 Di* 







Summer Workshops for Kids 

... ™... ju^«.» in Friday. Augus 



Young Members can join 
June Myles for a fun-filled 
week of workshops that will 
take place from Monday, 
August 8. through Friday. 
August 12, from 10.30 am. 
to noon. Tickets for the 90- 

minute programs, which are 
geared toward children be- 
tween the ages of 6 and 9 
are $18 and available only to | 

Participating and Hi. ; 

Members. Use the co 

righl to 

note that ticket, are available 

only by mail 

Monday. August 8 Tok. 
Cant Step Backward. Kids 

,he new Wallace Wing of 
Mammals and Their tAtmU 
Relatives to learn what it 
! means to be a mammal. At- 
terward they'll make a me- 
mento of their favonte 
prehistoric giant. 

Tuesday. August 9. Happy 
Birthday. AMNH' Celebrate 
the Museum's 125th annr 
sary with a look at its classic 
dioramas. Participants will 

learn about the techniques 
used in diorama construction 

and make their own minia- 
tures. A . in 
Wednesday. August iu 
Fabulous Frogs. Peep at the 
moves of some of the nearly 

4 000 different vaneties ot 
fr'ogs and make some hop- 
pers and jumpers to take 

"Thursday. August 11 Meet 



the Moche Play detective in 
the Gallery 3 exhibition Royal 
Tombs o/Sipan to discover 

the ancient Peruvian civiliza- 
tion of the Moche . Partici 
pants examine the clothing, 
.ewelry. and pottery on d 
play and use theii inspiration 
to design sand castu .■ 



Friday. August 12. Flash 
ers Th( -l .i. .luminescence ot 
certain plants and animals is 
the focus ol this workshop 
Children will search Museum 

bits for creatures that give 
off flashes of Hghl and make 
their own glow In ilie-dark 
creatures. 



Summer Workshops for Kids 
Take a Giant Step Backward, Mon.,' 

Hap! 

No. of t.. *\ 8: z- 

Fabutous Frogs. Wed.. A 

No. of i ' * 18: — r — , , 

Meet the Ma ftu 9 u 

No. of tickets at $18: 

Flashers. Fn.. Aug. 12 

No of tickets at $18: 

! Total amount enclosed: 

J Name: 



• Address; 
I City — 



_State: 



J Daytime telephone: 

i 

! Membership category: 



10024-51 




New 
Chairman 

for AMNH 




Anne Phipps Sidamon- 
off, a Museum trustee 
since 1967 and a vice chair- 
man since 1990. succeeds 
the current chairman. William 
T Golden, on July 1- Mr. 
Golden has been elected 



chairman emeritus. 

A native New Yorker. Mrs 

Sidamon-Enstoff has been 
one of the boards most ac- 
„ve and dedicated members. 
She attended the Chapin 
School and was graduated 
from BrynMawr College She 

is secretary of the board ot 
doctors of the World Wildlife 

,d and serves on 
boards of the Greenacre 
Foundation, the Museum ot 



the Hudson Highlands the 

Highland Falls Public Library. 

the Storm Kinq Art O 

Black Rock Consor 

Working do ' ,ne 

Mus tesidentand 

Board of Tni ^ lda " 

■ .-Eristoff will oversee 
long-range planning, includ- 
ing defining the Must-urns 

sionandrai sli 

money for its lultillment. 



Young Members* Birthday Parties 
at the Museum 

Celebrate Your Birthday with Relatives and Friends 



We'll provide the relatives 
— extinct ones, that is. Many 
of these kinfolks will be 
strangers, and others will just 
be strange, and you'll do a 
little climbing through then 
family trees. At the new 1 lla 
Acheson Wallace Wing of 
Mammals and Their Extinct 
Relatives, you'll get 
acquainted with some prehls 
toric beasts like mammoi i 
mastodons, and saber-toothed 
cats and discover which of 
these creatures are gone for- 
ever and which have modern 



cousin-. 

You bring the friends (and 
the cake), and we'll play 
games, make a mammalian 
family memento, and party 
away for two hours. It will be 
a birthday that won't fade 
into oblivion' 

The Membership Office 
: s other theme parties 
for Members between the 
ages of 5 and 10 that focus 
on dinosaurs. African mam- 
mals, reptiles and amphib- 
ians, ocean dwellers, and 
Native Americans. 



The group should be no 
fewer than 10 and no more 
than 20 The fee is $275 plus 
$15 per child and covers all 
materials and the services of a 
Museum party coordinator. 
The coordinator will help you 
plan a party that suits your 
child's tastes and will handle 
everything from candles to 
party favors. All you need to 
do is bring the cake and help 
escort the guests. 

For more information about 
the parties, call (212) 769- 
5542 



Discovery Tours to Tibet and Morocco 



Tins fall Ihe Museum's 
Discovery Tours are n-tuni 
Ing .ilt.'i ,i long absence, to 
two special destinations: to 
I iIh'I don i September 2 to 
19; and to Morocco, from 
September 24 to October 8. 
I high in the Himalayas 
,it the very "roof of the 
woiU I lbe1 is .in ani lent 
land like no other It- topog- 
raphy which is magnificent in 
Its natural beauty anil Isolal 
ing in it- sheet ruggedness. 
has aided in the creation of a 
, ulture marked by intense 
spiritual devotion and unique 
traditions. Accompanied by 
Museum ethnologist l_aila 
Williamson, Discovery Tours 



participants will visit the cities 
of Lhasa, Xigaze. and 
Gyantze, as well as the Yar- 
long Valley, which is consid- 
ered the cradle of Tibetan 
i ivilization. The program 
begins with a tay in Hong 
Kong and ends with a few 
days in Beijing. 

The other September Dis 
covery Tour is to Morocco. 

unrivaled in its images of 
u splendor, with its 

minarets mosques, palaces, 
uks, and ancient kasbahs 

filled with colorfully robed 

Berbers and snake charmers. 

Ii is also a land of starkly 

iiitul landscapes, from the 

Atlas Mountains to the vast 



Sahara Desert. Discovery 
Tours travelers, accompanied 
by a guest specialist in Islamic 
studies, will explore the fabled 
cities of Marrakesh. Fez, and 
Meknes. the Sahara Desert, 
the Atlas Mountains, and the 
walled adobe villages of the 
renowned Road of the Thou- 
sand Kasbahs 

Prices are $7,695 for the 
Tibet land/air package (per 
person, double occupancy) 
and $5,573 for the Morocco 
land/air package (per person, 
double occupant 

For more information call 
Discovery Tours at (800) 
462-8687 or in New York 
State (212) 769-57(Hi 



A Call to Teach 

Each yeaj thi »isands of 
schoolchildren visit the Mm 
seum. We need you as a 
teaching volunteer to arts' 
children - questions and add 



ti i i heir sense of wonder 
aV> iul the world. Teaching 
volunteers work with classes 
on schooldav mornings I "n 



not required; we will train 
you. The ne\t naming pro- 
gram starts this (all 

Call (212) 769-5566 for an 
application. 



A Planet-Walk through the Solar System 

The Earth 

as a Peppercorn 

Sunday, July 17, at 1:00 pm 
Sunday, August 14, at 1:00 p.m. 
Free 



It's difficult to picture the 
dimensions of the solar sys- 
tem — the planets are rela- 
tively small and distances 
between them almost 
absurdly great. For a model 
whose scale is true to size and 
distance, step outside. 

The planet-walk is a 1,000- 
yard model of the solar sys- 
tem that was devised in 1969 
by astronomer and teacher 



Guy Ottewell. The walk be- 
gins on the Planetarium s 
front steps at 81st Street, 
where volunteer tour leader 
Robert Campanile will take 
participants on a "journey" of 
discovery throughout the 
universe. 

For reservations and further 
information about the tours, 
call the Volunteer Office at 
(212) 769-5566. 




Celebrate 



The Royal Tombs 
of Sipan 

With Peruvian Specialities at 
the Garden Cafe 

Lunch, Man. Fri. 11:30 3:30 



Weekend Brunch, Sat. Sum 11-4 
Dinner, Fri, Sat: 5 - 7:30 

n uiioru suffgtutt'd 
■ „ii t he Gunli n < ufi m 212 :..'> :.K<>. r > 
i oi ated mi tin- Lower Level 




vtmb 




Our charming little fhlrt features a browsing Apatosaurus 
whose long tall winds around to the back. 

Handmade batik on preshrunk and colorfast 100«*> cotton. Soft blue dlno 
on rich cobalt blue background. 

Please specify S(Toddler). M(*-4) or 1(56). 

To order, send $21.00 for each (Includes shipping and handling within US) «° : 

Members' Choice Collection 

American Museum of Natural History 

Central Park West at 79th Street 

New York. New York 10024 

for Mastercard/ Vita orders, please call 212 76» SSW 



Museum 
Notes 



Hours 

Exhibition Halls 

" Mon -Thurs. & Sun 10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

Fri. &Sat. 10:00 a.m.-8:45 p.m. 

The Museum Shop 

Mon -Thurs. & Sun 1 0:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

Fri & Sat. 10:00 am -7:45 p.m. 

The Junior Shop 

Mon -Fri 10:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun. 10-00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

The Museum Library 

Tues-Fri 11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m 

The Discovery Room 

Free passes are distributed at the first-floor 
,n formation desk beginning at 11 45 am Ages 5 
and older. Children must be accompanied by an 
adult. Closed on holidays and weekdays and for 
the month of September. 

Sat. & Sun Noon-4:30 p.m. 

The Natural Science Center 

For children of all ages and their families. 
Closed on Mondays and holidays and for the 
month of September 

Tues _Fri 10.30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 

IU " & 2:00-4:30 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun. 1 00-4:30 p.m. 



Museum Dining 

Diner Saurus Fast Service Eatery 
Dai l y 11:00 a.m. -4:45 p.m. 

Garden Cafe 

Reservations. (212) 769-5865 

Lunch: Mon.-Fri ...11 30 a.m. -3: 30 p .m. 

Dinner: Fri. & Sat 5:00-7:30 p.m. 

Brunch: Sat. & Sun 11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

Whale's Lair 
Fri 3:00-8:00 p.m. 

Sat "..".... Noon-8:00 p.m. 



Sun. & most holiday- Noon-5 00 p.m. 

Snack Carts (at 77th Street & on the first floor of 
the Roosevelt Memorial Hall) 

Sat. & Sun 11 00a.m.-4-00pm. 



Entrances 

During Museum hours visitors can ente> 
building through the 77th Street entrance, the 
parking lot entrance (81st Street), i >o- 

seuelt Memorial Hall entrance (79th Street and 
Central Park West) Visitors attending pro- 
grams after hours can enter the building 
through the driveway entrance at 79th 
Street and Central Park West. 



Parking 

The Museum's parking lot is located on olsl 
Street between Central Park West and Columbus 
Avenue. Space is limited and available on a I 
come, first-served basis: fees are $12 for cars and 
$11 for buses. The lot is open from 9:30 a.m. to 
930 p.m. on Sunday through Thursday and from 
9:30 a.m. to midnight on Friday and Saturday. 

Hertz Manhattan, located one block away from 
the Museum at 210 West 77th Street (between 
Broadway and Amsterdam), offers parking 
discounts to Members: on Monday through 
Friday Members receive a $2 discount off regular 
prices and on Saturday and Sunday they receive 

a $3 discount. ~, M 

Call the Membership Office at (212) 769-5606 
for information about alternative parking. 

Museum Tours 

Free Museum Highlights Tours are available to 
individuals and families. Tours are conducted 
daily at 10.15 and 1115 am .. 1.15. 2 15. and 
3:15 p.m. and depart from the second floor be- 
tween the Roosevelt Rotunda and the Hall of 
African Mammals 

Group Tours are available for a fee. All Group 
Tours must be scheduled through the Volunteer 
Office For details, call (212) 769-5566. 




Carl Akeley photographing a volcano from 

The World Explored: 125 Years of Collecting 

Photographs in the Library Gallery 



Happenings at the Hayden 



Lectures 

Frontiers in Astronomy and 
Astrophysics 

On Wednesday. July 13. at 7:30 p.m noted 
author Andrew Chaikin will present an illustrated 
talk "An Apollo Retrospective." Chaikin will review 
the scientific findings from the first manned landing 

on the moon. 

On Thursday. July 21. at 7 30 p.m Peter G. 
Wilhelm. director of the Naval Center for Space 
Technology, will present an illustrated talk. Project 
Clementine: A Return to the Moon. Wilhelm will 
discuss the first return to the moon since Apollo. 

These lectures are part of the Frontiers m As- 
tronomy and Astrophysics series Tickets are *o 
for Participating and Higher Members and $8 tor 
non-Members. For information *}™\ffit*™*r 
ability and upcoming lectures, call (212) 769-5900. 
Use the coupon at right to order tickets. 

Exhibition 

Man on the Moon: 
The Apollo Adventure 

This special exhibition, which marks the twenty- 
f.fth anniversary of the Apollo 1 1 moon landing, 
features a qigantic scale replica of the original 
Apollo 1 1 lunar module, the Eagle, that was cre- 
ated with thousands of ERECTOR* set pieces as 
well as a full-size ERECTOR" replica of the Lunar 
Rover used on the moon. Also on display are actual 
moon rocks, a moon map. memorabilia Iromthe 
Apollo flights, Apollo mission photos from INAS/v 
and an ongoing presentation of the award-winning 
(ilm The Eagle Has Landed. 



Sky Shows 



Update: The Universe 

New discoveries from space are revealed on a 
daily basis b K I.. ding information about black holes. 



new planets, and colliding galaxies. In this fast- 
paced, "news magazine" presentation, you 11 get an 
astronomy update and look through the new win- 
dows on the universe that astronomers have opened 
with the latest technology. 

In the past three years space telescopes such as 
the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory the Euro- 
pean ROSAT. and the recently overhauled Hubble 
Space Telescope have been exploring the universe 
from space, able to view light that never reaches 
our eyes. At the same time, giant earth-bound tele- 
scopes scan the heavens, searching for signs ot 
intelligent life in our galaxy. 

Showtimes: OA 

Mon -Fn I 30 and 3:30 pm 

Sat & Sun 1 DO. 200. 3:00, and 4 00 p.m. 

Call (212) 769-5100 for prices and additional 

information. 

Children's Shows 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers Children sing along with .mages of 
their favorite Sesame Street Muppets as they learn 
about rainbows, the phases of the moon sunsets, 
and stars Sat . July 9. at 10 30 a m . and Sat 
Aug 6, at 1030 and 1 1 45 a.m. For prices and 
ticket information, call (212) 769-5900 

Robots in Space features Lucasfilm s R2D2ana 
C-3PO- and has been created especially tor chil- 
dren ages 7 to 12. Together with a live host, these 
famous space robots take children on a tour of the 
universe See how satellites and probes - the real 
space robots - help us learn about worlds near and 
far Joumev from the earth to other planets and 
distant black holes. Sat lulj 9 and Sat.. Sept 10 
at 1 1 45 am For prices and ticket informat.on call 
(212)769-5900 

Laser Shows 

Journey into another dimension where laser visu- 
als and rock music combine to create a dazzling 
experience of sight and sound. Shows are pr< 
on Fridays and Saturdays at 700. 830. and 10 00 



Naturemax 

The new IMAX film Search for the Great 

an incredibly exciting underwater 
cinematic experience. They'll go on a round-the 
globe expedition to dlSCOVei 9 OTM of the worlds 
largest sharks and to observe them at clos 
Blue sharks, whale sharks, and the notorious gi 
white shark are put wed from the coasl "i ( alifomla 
to the remote reaches of southern and western 

Australia. 

Showtimes for Search for the Great Sharks arc 

i;> |0 ' 10 and4 10 p.m Africa The 
ngetl, which explores th< relationships 

between predator and prcv. Is sh< »V n al ' ' ' 10 and 
11:30 a.m. and 1 30 and '> .M),.m d 

On Friday and Saturday al 6 l " 1 ">' ' 10 pm 
Search for the Great Sharks is shown on ,\ double 
bill with Africa. The Serengi ill Schedules and 
prices are subject to change without notice. Call 
(212) 769-5650 for further Information 
Admission (I 'at t» Ipatingand Hlghei Mernb 
Adults: $4.75 single feature; $6douU- Feature 
Children. $2.25 single featun > double 

feature 



p.m. For prices and show schedule, telephone 
(212) 769-5100. 

It's always a good idea to call before visit 
ing the Planetarium, since prices, programs, 
and showtimes are subject to change without 
notice. For general Planetarium information, 
call (212) 769-5100. 



! Lecture: "An Apollo Retrospective." 

J Wednesday. July 13. 7 JO p.m 
' Number of Members Hi Kris at $6 

(no more than 4. please): — 
! Number of non-Members' tickets at $8 
! Total .minimi .-nclosed: — 

J Lecture: "Project Clementine." Thursday. 

; July 21. 7 30p.m 

' Number of Members' tickets at $6 

! (no more than 4 please). — 

! Number of non-Members' tickets at $8:_ 

! Total amount enclosed. — 



! Nani'' 



• Address: 



City: 



.State: 



.Zip:- 



I Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: 

Please make check payable to the Hayden 
Planetarium and mail with a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to Lecture. Hayden 
Planetoriun d Park West ■ I Street, 

New York. NY 1002 

Please note that ticket order 

availability and cannot be processed without 

telephoi 

envelope Do not include ticket requests or 

checks for American Museum programs. 



Sun 



Mon 



Tues 



Wed 



July 1994 

American Museum 
of Natural History 



Independence I ' 
rTlie Museum i> open 



69:00 a.m.-400 
p.m. Members' Day 
to the New York 
Botanical Garden $40. 
and open only to Partici 
Bng and Hlghei Mem- 
ben. Tickets required. 
Page 2 




10 



11 



■m QNoon and 3:00 
M. £p -m. Members' 
Walking Tour of the Back 
Streets of the Seaport 
$15. and open only to 
rmiupating and Higher 
Members. Tickets required 
Page 2. 



<| A 7:30 p.m. Fron 

M. «5 tiers in Astron- 
omy and Astrophy-i 
Speaker. Andrew Chaikin: 
"An Apollo Retrospec- 
Planetarium Sky 
Theater. $6 (or Members. 

|8 fel non-Members. 

Page 7 



1 A 8:30 a.m.-5:30 
X *»p.m. Members' 
Dan Trip to Snug Harbor 
and the Staten Island 
Zoo. $45, and open only 
to Participating and Higher 
Members Tickets required 
Page 2 



Wildlife Photographer of the Year, 

on display in the Akeley Gallery 

through July 31. features the 

winners of an international 

competition. 



•f *9\:QQ p.m. The 
M. m Earth m •> I 

com; A Planet-Walk 
through the Solar Sys 
lem I ree Page 6 



18 



19 



C% fVl0:00 a.m. and 
^1/2:00 p.m. Mem- 
bers' Walking Tour ■ 
Cathedral of St John the 
Divine. $20. and open 
only to Participating and 
Higher Members Til I 
required Page 2 
SOLD OUT. 



C% ■• 7:30 p.m. Fron- 
& A. tiers in Astron- 
omy and Astrophysics 
Speaker Peter G Wilhelm. 
director ol the Naval Cen- 
, Space Technology: 
Project Clementine " 
Planetarium Sky Theater. 
$6 for Members, $8 for 
non-Members. Page 7 



06:00.6:30. 
447:00, and 7:30 
p.m. Members' Guided 
Tours of Royal Tombs of 
Sipdn $3, and open only 
to Participating and Higher 
Members Tickets required 
Page 3. 



23 



24 



25 



■Noon and 4:00 
)p.m. Members' 



O "• Last chance to see 
O AWlldll/e Pholog 
ropher oj '!" Vear in the 

Akel. 



26; 

Walking Tours of Fiue 
Points and Chinatown 
$20, and open only t( i 
Participating and Hlgl 
Members Tickets required 
Page 3 
SOLD OUT. 



27 



28 



8:30 a.m.-5:30 
'p.m. Houi Water 
Works. Members' day tnp 
$50, and open only to 
Participating and Higher 
Members. Page 2. 



29 



30 



Sun 



Mon 



August 1994 



810:30 a.m.-fioon 
anl Step 

Backiuard Members i hll 

dren's workshoi 

open only to Participating 

andl embers 

lick 



Tues 

29:00 a.m.-2:00 
p.m. Members' Day 
[>lp to the Raptor Trust 
' and open only to 

Partii ipatlng and Highei 
Page 



910:30 a.m.-noon 
I hippy Birthday. 
AMNHI Members' 1 1 nl 

workshop. $18. and 
open only to Participating 
and Highei Members 
Tickets required Page 5. 



Wed 



Thur 



48:30 a.m.-5:30 
p.m. Members' Day 
Trip to the Croton Reser- 
voir $50, and open only 
to Participating and Higher 
Members. Tickets required. 
Page 2 




io; 



kl0:30 a.m.-noon 

_FFabulotis Frogs 
Members' children's w 
shop $18. and open 
to Participating and Highei 
Members Tickets required 
Page 5 



1-« 10:30 a.m.-noon 
X Meet the Moche. 
Members' children's work- 
's 18. and open only 
to Participating and Higher 
Members. Tickets required. 
Pag> 



-| f% 10:30 a.m.-noon 
M. mtFlashers Members 
children s workshop. $18, 
and open only to Participat- 
ing and Higher Members 
Tickets required Page 5 



13 






Sharp Eyes: John Burroughs and 
Environmental Writing in America 
July 24-30 

A summer conference at 
SUNY-Oneonta will offet 
opportunities for nature walks 
and hikes following John Bur- 
roughs' footsteps al ( oopei 
st own. Woodchuck Lodge in 
Roxbury. Slabsides. and 

Riverby. 

Panels and scholarly papers 
on Burroughs and .Mlici envi 
ronment.il writers will be fea- 
tured at the conference, which 
is intended for teachers, envi- 
ronmentalists, writers, and all 
who love the beauty of New 



York State Graduate and 
undergraduate credit is avail- 
able. 

Keynote speakers will be 
Edward Kanze, author of The 
World oj John Burroughs, 
and Tom Horton. who won 
the Burroughs Medal for Bay- 
Country. 

For more information, write 
to Continuing Education, 
SUNY-Oneonta. NY 13820. 
or call the John Burroughs 
Association at (212) 769- 

5169. 



17 



1 © 8:00 a.m.-8:00 

X Opm. From 
Quarry to Quonset Mem- 
bers' day trip to Stony 
Creek Granite Quarry and 
Quonset. Rhode Island 
Tickets required Page 1. 



19 



20 



_, 



n A 11:00 a.m. and 
£* **3:00 p.m. The 
Jewish Lower East Side 
Members walking tour 
$20. and open only to 
Participating and Hi< 
Members Ticket- required 
- 3 



O C 7:0 ° p m - Bobl/ 

£i*3 Belugas Mem- 
bers' evening program 
Kaufmann Theater $7 (or 
Members, $10 (or non- 
Members. 
Pag. 1 



26 



27 



28 



29 



>3:00 and 5:30 
p.m. The Reoolu- 



Printed on recycled paper 



30 

lew York Mem 
i .llnig tour $20. and 
open only to Participating 
and Higher Members 
Page 3 



31 



The Museum receives substantial support from a number o( major sources e 
particularly grateful to the City o( New York, which owns the Museum ™' w,l ?St , e 
provides (unds (or their operation and maintenance, and to the New Yor * . 
Council on the Art*. National Science Foundation, National Endowmeiit io 
Arts, National Endowment lor the Humanities, 300 corporations. 10U P 
(oundations, 520,000 members, and numerous individual contnbutors. 













For Participating and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



Vol 19. No. 8 September 1994 






Empires Beyond the Great Wall: 
The Heritage of Genghis Khan 



.irteiyolN*ii \ngtlm County 



Exhibition opens in Gallery 77 on Friday, September 1 6 
Members' private viewing: Thursday, September 22, 6:00-9:00 

Over the last 40 years a series 
of extraordinary discoveries have 
substantially augmented Western 
knowledge of long-ago empires that 
prospered beyond China's great wall. 
These discoveries indicate that the 
Mongols were the last in a long series 
of steppe empires to emerge from 
east A 

Gold and silver plates and vessels, 
bronze weapons, silk garments, pot- 
tery, porcelain, and funerary ware are 
among the treasures on display in 
Empires Beyond the Great Wall: 
The Heritage of Genghis Khan. The 
new exhibition features artifacts dating 
from the second millennium BC up 
to the era of Genghis Khan and the 
Yuan dynasty of the thirteenth and 
fourteenth centuries These priceless 
artifacts, none of which has ever been 



exhibited in the West, are from the 
collections of seven museums of 
China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous 
Region. 

In ancient times, the area known 
today as the Inner Mongolia Auton- 
omous Region was China's great 
northern frontier From the fifth cen- 
tury BC up to the Mongol conquest 
of the medieval world in the thirteenth 
century AD. nomadic peoples on 
horseback traveled along this frontier, 
founding empires that had a profound 
influence on Chinese dynastic history. 

It was not until the twentieth cen- 
tury, however, that the Western world 
became aware of the material culture 
of these ancient civilizations. In the 
early part of this century, investiga- 
tions by Silk Route archeologists re 
vealed to the West this high culture in 



p.m. 

all its extraordinary splendor. These 
discoveries subsequently formed the 
foundation of modem s< lentiflc studies 
of the Chinese Silk Route — the n 
of commerce and culture that con 
led the Eds! and West in antiquity. 

Dioramas, photographs, maps, 
videos, and music are featured in the 
exhibition, along with a full-size re- 
creation of a recently excavated fres- 
coed tomb of a Mongol nobleman 
will illustrate how the artu 
were originally used, and a Mongol 

1 1 with figures of women in tradi- 
tional costumes will offer insights into 
the lives of the people who lived In 
tins region. Photographs and paint- 
ings will help transport visitors back to 
a distant time and place, and video 
footage of traditional ancestral wor- 
ship ceremonies at the Genghis Khan 



temple will offer an in n of 

what Mongolian culti 

Empires Beyond the < ireal Wall 
was organized by the Natural Hlsti 
Museum ol I us Angeles ("Hi' 

i!>oration with th< 
Museum of China It will be on display 
through November 27 

Members' Private Viewing 

Members can attend a pi 
ing of the exhibition on Thursday. 
September 22. from 6:00 to 900 
p.m. The private viewing is free and 
open only to Participating and Higher 
Members, and your valid membership 

is youi ticket of admission A 
related Members program. G 
Khan. Hero or Villain ' will also be 
presented that evening See the article 
on page 2 for details. 



Genghis Khan: Hero or Villain? 



Thursday, September 22 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$7 fo? Members, $10 for non-Members 



Nearly 800 years after I 
, . Genghis Khan 
alarger-than life figure Opin- 
ions about his character and 
historical significance vary 
considerably. Westerners tend 
to regard him as a blood- 
barbarian i hines 
histi edit him with the 

Pax Mongoliia. which i 

,,i cultural and commer- 
cial „,tov< I i.mges between 

and West. Modern Mon- 
gols, whose nationalism is 
fueled by a cult of Gei nil nv 

■ him as t brilliant 

military i ommander ol all 
id the true founder of 

mgolia. 

II,,. life ., nd career ol the 
warrior-king will be examined 
at the Members' program 



Genghis Khan. Hero or 
Villain? The program is 
• nted in conjunction with 

the exhibition Empires Be- 
yond the Great Wall The 
Heritage of Genghis Khan. 
which opens in Gallery 77 
this month (see page 1 for 
furtl .Is about the 

exhibition) Historian Morris 
Rossabi will examine the 
enduring legacy created by 
Genghis and his sons: the 
empire that inextricably linked 

East to West 

Genghis and his successors, 
including his renowned grand- 
son Khubflal Khan, permitted 
opean envoys merchants, 
and craftsmen — including 
Marco Polo — then first op- 
portunity to journey as far as 



China. In turn, Asian goods 
traveled to Europe along the 
caravan trails, and the ensu- 
ing Western demand for these 
products eventually inspired 
the search for a sea route to 

Asia. . . 

On his way to the peacetul 
era of international exchange, 
however. Genghis unleashed 
ton-ents of death and destruc- 
tion. His conquest and rule 
were rife with similar contra- 
dictions. An illiterate and 
in educated nomad, he or- 
dered the development of the 
first Mongol written language, 
supported craftsmen and 
artists, and patronized a vari- 
ety of religions. 

Morris Rossabi is currently 
professor of history at the 
City University of New York 
and adjui id pr< >fessor at 
Columbia University He is 
the author of Khubilai Khun 
His Life and Times (Univer- 
sity of California Press. 1988) 
and Voyager from Xanadu 
(Kodansha. 1992). 

Use the coupon on page 3 
to register. 



Celebrating Our Mistakes 

Stories and Songs for the New Year 



Tuesday. September 13 

7.00 p.m. 

Main Auditorium 
$15 for Members, 
$20 for non-Members 




Diane Wolkstein 



World-known rabbi and 
folksinger Shlomo Carlebach 
and master st orv iane 

i to the 

,,, I program a immemo- 

ratin ' '- ar - 

rhev !i " '""" 

Kippur is the most human of 
holidays foi it Is human to 
mak. " we have the 

courage to admit them, oui 

s can be the source of 
0U1 growth and compassion 
Carlebach and Wolkst< in will 
made true-life tories as well 
l lasidic stories of wisdom 
and humor. 

With his music and 

retelling of Hasidic teachings, 
Carlebach touches the hearts 
of his listeners. He has com- 
posed thousands of melodies 
that are sung throughout the 



world, recorded 25 album 
and published two songbooks. 

reported Li /« ■ 

as wide 
I,,- heart andasqteat .is his 
soul.' He is the rabbi at 
Carlebach Shul in New York 

Diane Wolkstein is a gifted 
storyteller who performs 

ii s as well as fairytales at 
univ. libraries, theaters, 

and festivals She has written 
17 hooks of folklore, includ- 
[ng {norma and The First 
Love Stories, and has made 
12 recordings. She was re- 
cently featured on Charles 
Kutaults CBS News Sunday 
Morning." which profiled her 
25 years of storytelling, writ- 
ing, and teaching. 

Use the coupon on page 3 
to register. 



Aussie Porta Puppets 

Sunday, September 11 

1:30 p.m. 

Under Theater -fc— 

$6 for Members, $8 for non-Members 

Appropriate for ages 3-7 
Grandparents free with grandchildren 



Birth Control 

in the Ancient World 

Thursday, September 29 

7:00 p.m. 

KMenlb^lZfornon-Members 



Australian puppeteer Mar- 
got Siemei tells teles from the 

billabong and teaches children 
about conservation, the envi- 
ronment, and the unique 
animals from Down Under at 
a performance by the Aussie 
Porta Puppets 

Kids will learn about the 
hazards of littering and play 
ing with things they don't 
understand when Kate Kan- 
garoo cleans up the billabong. 



They'll also take in some tips 
on health and hygiene bom a 
clever kookaburra who shows 
Cornelius Croc the remedy 
for his toothache. 

Siemer. a former kinder- 
garten teacher, grew up on a 
sheep station in the outback 
of West Australia with emus 
and kangaroos as pets Her 
performances combine her 
interest in puppetry and sto- 
rytelling with her love of 



Margot Siemer 

wildlife. She and her creations 
have performed their original 
stories at schools, colleges, 
libraries, museums, and the- 
aters around the world. 

This program is a Septem- 
ber Senior Special — each 
grandparent will be admitted 
to the program free when 
accompanied by a paying 
grandchild Use the Septem- 
ber Members' programs 
coupon on page 3 to register. 



Alas, Persephone ate six 
kernels of a pomegranate 
during her sojourn in the 
underworld, so she was 
obliged to return to Hades for 
six months each year Thus 
we have six months of harsh 
weather while she's gone and 
her mother, the goddess of 
agriculture, weeps, followed 
by six months of blooming 
warmth upon Persephone's 

retun i 

This familiar Greek myth, a 
metaphor for the cycles of 
the seasons, also refers to an 
ancient form of contracep- 
n. m. According to Galen, the 
foremost physician in classical 
antiquity, pomegranates are 
an effective contraceptive, 
along with willow and date 

palm. 

The ancients possessed a 
wealth of knowledge a! iouI 
plant life than enabled the 

se herbal methods of bit 1 1 1 
control. This knowledge was 
lost by the time of the Renais- 
sance, and the story of ar- 
chaic forms of contraception 
is only now beginning to 
emerge. At the Members' 
program Birth Control in 
the Ancient World historian 
John Riddle will discuss 
what's been recovered of this 
lost knowledge. 

The ancient Egyptians were 



practicing botanical birth 
control long before the 
Greeks and Romans; a pa- 
pyrus from 1550-1500 BC 
lists acacia gum among other 
abortifacients. and modem 
studies have found acacia to 
be spermatocidal. Other 
plants used in classical times 
as contraceptives or abortifa- 
cients include pennyroyal, 
artemisia, myrrh, and rue. 
The seeds of Queen Anne's 
lace, or wild carrot, were 
declared by Hippocrates to 
prevent and terminate preg- 
nancy when taken orally 
Recent laboratory experi- 
ments with rats confirm this 
assertion, and a few contem- 
porary women in rural areas 
of North Carolina and India 
eat Queen Anne's lace seeds 
to reduce fertility — just as 
women did 2.00o yearsa/w, 

John Riddle will discuss 
these and other herbal birth 
control agents and the possi 
ble reasons that they have 
faded from common usage. A 
professor of history at North 
Carolina State University. 
Riddle is the author of Con- 
traception and Abortion 
from the Ancient World to 
the Renaissance (Harvard 
University Press). 

Use the coupon on page 3 
to register. 




ISSN 0194-6110 

Vol. 19. No. 8 
September 1994 

Donna Bell — Editor 

Sheila Greenberg — Manager of Membership Services 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Yolanda Loften — Fulfillment Coordinator 

Robert Jahn — Program Coordinator 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and Higher 
Members of the American Museum of Natural History is 
published monthly September through June, bimonthly JUiy 
August. Publication offices are at Natural History magazine. 
Amencan Museum of Natural History. Central Park West ai 
79th Street. New York. NY 10024-5192. Telephone: (tin 
769-5606. Subscriptions. $50 a year for Participating 
Membership. $100 a year for Contributor Membership. 
© 1994 American Museum of Natural History. Second -ci as. 
postage paid at New York, NY. Postmaster: Please send aaa 
changes to: Rotunda. Membership Office. American Museu 
Natural History. Central Park West at 79th Street. New Yor*. 
NY 10024-5192. 



Printed by Waldon Press. Inc., New York 




Members' Day Trip to 

Hawk Mountain 

Saturday, October 15 

IS? an" ole°n°o P nly to Participating and Higher Members 

Appropriate for ages 16 and up 




Red-tailed hawk 



Hawks, osprcys, and eagles 
are among the migrating 
raptors that travel the Ap- 
palachian flyways during their 
seasonal migrations. After 
leaving their breeding 
grounds in Canada and the 

northern states, thousands of 
hawks and other birds of prey 
pass through Pennsylvania's 
Hawk Mountain Sanctuary — 
where they're admired by 
flocks of birdwatchers 

Members can enjoy an 
autumn day of birdwatching 
at the sanctuary with natural- 
ist Stephen C. Quinn. a Mu- 
seum authority on birds and 
birdwatching. Hell join Mem- 



bers as they walk around the 
mountain to look for raptors, 
and all participants will lunch 
on the mountain's north look- 
out and watch for migrating 

birds of prey. 

Transportation is by bus; 
the drive is about three hours 
each way. Be sure to wear 
proper clothing for outdoors, 
including hiking boots or 
sneakers, and don't forget to 
bring binoculars and a bag 
lunch (there are no refresh- 
ments for sale). 

Use the coupon on page b 
to register, and please note 
that tickets are available only 

by mail. 



Hudson Valley Cruise 

Sunday, October 23 

$0&ML5i£. and $60 for non-Members 

Appropriate for ages 13 and up 



An ideal opportunity to 
survey the autumn foliage, 
the Hudson Va/tey Cruise 
wi\\ toUe participants trom 
Wall Street to West Point and 
back. A high-speed catama- 



ran will cany Members in 
comfort through the historic 
Hudson Valley at the peak of 
the seasons changing colors. 
Cruisers will sail along the 
entire length of the Palisades 




Geology, ecology, and colored leaves 



and pass Croton Point. 
They'll enter Haverstraw Bay 
and the gateway of the Hud- 
son Highlands, following the 
river through its most spec- 
tacular scenery to West Point 
and Storm King Mountain. 

A pair of experts will be on 
hand to discuss the region s 
geology, ecology, and 
forestry. Sidney Horenste.n, 
coordinator of environmental 
public programs at the Mu- 
seum, will point out aspects 
of geological interest .William 
Schuster, forester and direc- 
tor of the Black Rock Forest 

Preserve, will talk about local 
plant life and the relationship 
of Black Rock to the rest of 
the Hudson Highlands. 

Use the coupon on page b 
to register, and please note 

that tickets are available only 

by mail 



September 
Members* 
Programs Coupon 



Name: 



Address: 



City: 



StcU- 



.Zip:. 



Daytime telephone 



Membership category;. 



Total amount enclosed: 




Members' Day Trip to a 



jnd 



Pennsylvania Coal Mine 

Saturday, September 24 
SOLD OUT from previous issue 



>s 
Idrcss 

urn of 

.rk. 



Members can explore some 
of the Northeast' s major geo- 
logical provinces with Sidney 
Horenstein. the Museum s 
coordinator of environmental 
public programs. 

They'll board a bus at the 
Museum and travel across 
New Jersey to the spectacular 



Delaware Water Gap. The 
journey continues across the 
Pennsylvaman Appalachians, 
where the group will board 
coal trains and enter both 
subsurface and open-p«t 

mines. Retired l«ri I miners 
will be on hand to discuss 

their experiences. 



The trip will include a tour 
of a ghost town that is being 
evacuated because the coal 
mine beneath the town is on 
fire and represents a hazard 
to residents. The final stop is 
for a short walk along a 
wooded path to collect plant 

fossils. 



Please make check (if applicable) payable to the '*»-*» 

MSa^fiW-SS&S are no, 
accepted. No refunds or exchanges. 

i 

i a S.ed ts"«. 2*1 Assoc*,* Members 
J are entitled to one ticket. 

1 Aussie Porta Puppets. Sunday September 11. 1:30 p.m. 

! Number of Members' tickets at |b:__ 
1 Number of additional tickets at *»: 
1 Number of free grandparents I 
i 1 1 free ticket with each purchase;; — 
! Total amount enclosed for program:, 

J Stories and Songs for the New Year 

Tuesday, September 13 7:00 pm 

Number of Members Hckets a J 15 •__ 
1 Number of additional tickets at $ZU.__ 
1 Total amount enclosed for program: — 

J Genghis Khan. Thursday, September 22. 7:00 p.m. 

! Number of Members ticke ts at |7 :__ 
! Number of additional tickets at $1U.__ 
| Total amount enclosed for program: __ 

i Birth Control in the Ancient World 

1 Thursday. September 29 7:00 o^m 

! Number of Members ticke s at |8._ 
1 Number of additional tickets at *1^:__ 
• Total amount enclosed for program: — 

! Okavango. Thursday. October 6 ,7 00 p.m. 

! Number of Members tickets a J 1 "— 
! Number of additional tickets at 5>lb: — 
J Total amount enclosed for program: — 

1 Jennie. Tuesday. October 11 £00 p.m. 
! Number of Members ticke s a |b:_ 
I Number of additional tickets at $8: — 
J Total amount enclosed for program ___ 

; Ghost Stories. Friday. October 28. 
I For children 

! Number of Members hckets at $5_ 
! Number of additional tickets at $8 -.___ 
J Total amount enclosed for program:__ 

J For adults tft 

■ Number of Members tickets at |8:__ 
. Number of additional tickets at *1Z: — 
! Total amount enclosed for programs 



i 
i 

i 
i 
i 
i 

i 

i 
, 
i 
i 
i 

i 
i 



lsasa«E£Bi£5£.| 
lSS3Sffl3£«*m 









Sex, Love, • 

and Religion in South India 

Friday, October 21 

6:30 p.m. 

Lindcr Theater . 

Free and open to all Museum visitors 



Okavango: 
Africa's Last Eden 

Thursday, October 6 

7:00 p.m. 

^iShSSSS^ $15 for non-Members 




All of tl " 1S 

d 
sexual i" md often the 

l iodand the lower 

sexu<>l Impul 

_ cr , problem f< u 

hui ln 

IIiimImi- 

oped a mi. thod ol int< 
and God in a phil 
lhal accepts all loving behav- 
i thebe- 
ling "I lime God became 
two deities Siva and Shakti 
and hrom their play the world 

,,,„. [ 0T th At ih.' end of 
time ill-- lovers Will reunite 
arid there wffl be only God, 
perfect pleasure, again 
Practices considered de- 



Siva with wife on knee 



viant in other religions — 
prostitution and homose 

tample — an 
cepted in a religion that 
allows the love of God to 
rpreted in a physical man- 
illy 
uni ontroHed fn I lin 
duism however, by ai cepting 
and offering a context for 
every aspect of love and sex. 
Hinduism nol only promotes 
tolerance but also creates an 
orderly society. 

Anthropologist Chantal 
Boulanger will describe how 
love and sex are viewed In 
South Indian religion and how 

nyths address every form 
of sexual behavior She'll 



,i,s, uss the roles of temple 
prostitutes trans and 

sex in the lives of married 
The evolution oi 
5 will also be 
long with the 
,il influence of British 

colonial' 

A graduate of l'Ecole 
Hautes Etudes en Sciences 
Sociales. Boulanger special- 
izes in ethnology and Indian 
studies She conducts field- 
work in Kanchipuram, a holy 

city of Tamil Nadu, where she 

has studied Siva temple 

priests since 1981. 
This program is free and 

no tickets are necessary but 

seating is limited. 



Members' Walking Tour of 

Ladies' Mile 

Friday, October 14 

SZ^ro^onfyTo Participating and Higher Members 
Appropriate for ages 18 and up 



The Gay '90s brought ele- 
gant design to fashion and 
grand department emporiums 
to Broadway. Members can 
learn about the ongins of 
New York's most exciting old 
and new shopping district on 
a walking tour that will point 
out the sites where Jim Brady 
bought diamonds, the Van 
derbilts chose carpets, and 
Lillian Russell ordered wide- 
bnmmed hats 
The Ladies Mile Historic 



I iisinct was developed largely 
in the decades following the 
( ml War. when commerce 
[ntn ided on the residential 
neighborhoods between 
Union and Madison squares. 
The area was redeveloped at 
the turn of the century, but in 
the past decade a variety of 
businesses have rediscovered 
and restored the district to its 
former status. 

Members will visit one local 
company — a prominent 



costumer of the Broadway 
theater — for a rare glimpse 
at the painstaking craftwork 
that goes into the creation of 
the stage's vibrant costumes. 

The tour will be led by 
Joyce Gold, a Manhattan 
historian and teacher (see the 
article at right for details of 
Gold's tour of the Financial 
District). Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register, and please 
note that tickets are available 
only by mail 







When Frans Lanting first 
ed southern All hi - Oka- 
vango Delta on assignment 
for National Geographic, he 
envisioned a six-week project. 
Instead, his work blossomed 
into an unprecedented under- 
taking that stretched over two 
years. He found an Africa he 
thought no longer existed — 
a wetland oasis of more than 
8,500 square miles in the 
middle of Botswana's Kala- 
hari Desert with a richness 
and diversity of wfldllfe 

The spectacular photo- 
graphs he took at the 
Okavango were published in 
National Geographic, help- 
ing the publication win the 
National Magazine Award for 
excellence in photography 
and earning Lanting the BBC 
title of Wildlife Photographer 
of the Year. 

Last year this body of work 
was published as Okavango: 
Africa's Last Eden (Chroni- 



cle Books) In words and 
images Lanting tells the 
miraculous story of a rivet 
that dies in the desert to give 
rise to one of the great' 
wetlands on the planet. Th 
book is also a personal ac- 
count of Lanting' s year 
among lions, elephants, and 
hippos. 

Lanting will talk with 
Members about his work ii i 
Okavango and share his pho- 
tographs of the region's land 
scapes and wildlife. in< ludjrio, 

nires of leopard- 
crocodiles, zebras, giraffes, 
hyenas, impalas. and the 
continent's last great unha- 
rassed herds of elephants 
Copies of his book will be 
available for purchase, and 
Lanting will sign copies after 
the show. 

Use the September Mem 
bers' programs coupon on 
page 3 to register for the 
program. 



Members' Walking Tour of the 

Financial District 
and the Federal 
Reserve Bank 

Friday, September 16 
11:00 a.m.-2:30 p.m. 
$25, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 
Appropriate for ages 16 and up 



A Members' walking tour 
looks at Manhattan's most 
secure bank and other points 
of historical interest 

At the Federal Reserve 
Bank of New York, which 
stores a significant part of the 
world's gold reserves. Mem- 
bers will leam about the insti- 
tution's operations and its 
role in the economy. They'll 
also visit the gold vault. 



Historian Joyce Gold will 
lead the tour. Gold teaches 
popular courses on Manhat- 
tan history at the New Scho< 
for Social Research and NY 
(see the feature at left for 
details about her tour of 
Ladies' Mile). 

Use the coupon on page 
to register for the tour, and 
please note that tickets are 
available only by mail. 






Jennie 



Tuesday, October 11 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$5 for Members, $8 for non-Members 



She was an adorable baby 
and an affectionate young- 
ster. Everyone loved Jennie 
But she grew and she grew 
and she entered a troubled 
adolescence of conflicts with 
her friends, her parents, and 
the police. Jennie was a 
chimpanzee with problems. 

In the novel Jennie author 
Douglas Preston explores 
the blurry line that divides 
humans and animals. The 
book raises ethical questions 
about the use of primates for 
research and the attempts to 
raise chimps among humans. 
Jennie examines what makes 
us human — and how re- 
markably close our qualities of 
humanity are to those of our 
nearest animal relatives. 

As a columnist for Natural 
History magazine, Preston 
explored the Museu i 
vaults, storage rooms, and 
archives, and he described his 
findings in Dinosaurs in the 
Attic. Among its true stories 
of the scientists and explorers 
who assembled the Museum's 
vast collections is the tragic 
tale of Meshie, a chimpanzee 
raised by a curator along with 
his own children. 

Preston will present a 
Memlvrs' program at which 
he'll show actual footage of 
Meshie from the Museum's 
archives. He will recount 
fascinating chimpanzee case 
histories — including those of 




Ghost 
Stories 




Meshie. Jennie's predecessor 



Lucy, Nim Chimpsky. Viki 
Hayes, and Washoe — and 
discuss the ethical and scien- 
tific issues surrounding 
chimps in captivity. 

"1 loue Jennie, the book 
and the chimp," said Jane 
Goodall. "[Preston has] crea- 



ted a very remarkable person 
and a very important book. 
The novel, which is published 
by St Martin's Press, will be 
available for purchase at the 
program. Use the September 
Members' programs coupon 
on page 3 to register. 



Members' Mask-Making Workshop for Adults 

You're Never Too Old 
for Tricks or Treats 

Sunday, October 30 

$l 3 8^d°oSen only to Participating and Higher Members 

Appropriate for ages 16 and up 



Every day is Halloween in 
New York City — it's part of 
Gotham's infinite vanety. 
Dressing up is an indulgence 
for every age, and making 
masks is an activity that's 
pursued around the world, as 
attested to by the Museum's 
displays of masks in the halls 
of Northwest Coast Indians, 
African Peoples, and else- 
where. 

The exhibits of beasts and 
beauties are sure to inspire 
you, whether you'd like to 
excite reactions of awe. re- 
spect, or humor. Mask- 
making offers a special op- 
portunity to be somebody else 
for a while, so bring your 



inner child out for a holiday 
and come create some head- 
gear You can make a head- 
piece for your own costume 
or a gift for a favorite friend 
The workshop will be pre- 
sented by June Myles. who 
has observed that many of 
the adults who tag along to 
her children's programs enjoy 
the crafts projects even more 
than the kids. Participants will 
work with everyday items 
rather than high-tech theatri- 
cal matenals 

You may barely recognize 
the transformation. Use the 
coupon at right to register 
and please note that tickets 
are available only by mail. 






Friday, October 28 

Kaufmann Theater 

6:00 p.m. (for children ages 5-1 1) 

$5 for Members, $8 for non-Members 

8:00 p.m. (for adults) 

$8 for Members, $12 for non-Members 



Storyteller Laura Simms 
will enchant listeners at tv 
Halloween programs featui 
ing ghost and spirit tal 
from the visible and Invisible 
worlds. She'll recount tradi 
tionalstotu's. lull of classic- 
wisdom, symbolism and 
humor, and make them rele 
vant to modern culture. True 
life adventures thai reveal the 
magic and mystery of dally 
existence will also be told. 
Tins year marks the lucky 

thirteenth anniversary of 
>imms' Halloween si 

the Museum A le.ider in the 
rival of storytelling as .in 

art form. Simms has traveled 

across three continents to 

hear and tell the wot I 

stories. Her teachers hav 



in, luded Margaret M< 

|,,m'|.Ii ( .nnpU'll Maun 

elders, Shoi i l">m 

■ 
American oi tin 1 S.ihsh 
I ni., Pol; i" ■ Ian el 

"Sh- >od as our grand 

parenl 

i0 p in progi 

which I lul 

d r , i n iii'' ages "I - r ) 

and 12, will b< lullol chlH 
and giggles indth«8;00 
p. n , mi foi adults 

|0U1 

neys into Strang- and fa 
i„ lands " i"'"' H ■■'' '" i '"■"' 
redi-,, ovei themselvi 

i ,,. ii K - Septembei Mem 
hers' programs coupon on 
page 3 to regisi 




Tours, Day Trips, and Workshops Use this coupon 
to register Tor the walking tours Ladles MM and n 

cial District, the Hudson Valley Cruise; the day trip 
Hawk Mountain, and the workshop Mask-Making for 

Adults 



Name(s) of program(s): 



Number of tickets and price (please indicate which pro 
gram if more than one): 



Total amount enclosed: 



Name 



Address: 



_State: 



.Zip: 



Daytime telephone:. 



Membership category: 



Please make check payable to the American ^Museum of 

Natural History and mail w ,.f-addressed. 

stamped envelope to Tours and Day r r ■ 
Membership Office. American Museum of Natural 
History. Central Park V Street New York. NY 

10024-51 






The Department of Education Presents 

Fall 1994 Lecture 



Earthquakes: 
Dangerous 
Windows to the 
Earth — Hazards 
from New York to 
California 



Three Tuesdays and a 
Thursday. Oct 11 Nov 1 

I 8:00 p.m. 
$22.50 for MemU 
$25 for non-Members for 
lectures only ($20 for stu- 
dents); $58.50 for Members. 
$65 for non-Member^ loi 
lectures and field tup (limited 
to 40 no student discount) 

This is the first in an annual 
series that will explore issues 
in the earth sciences. This 
program is co-sponsored by 
the departments i .1 Mineral 
Sciences and Education 

Oct 1 1 What Are Earth- 
quakes, and What Do They 
Tell Us about the Earth? 

Barbara Ron i. wlc head 

of the Berkeley Seismic Sta- 
tion and professor in the 
Department of Geology and 
Geophysics at the University 
of California. Berkeley. 

Oct. 20: Seismic Behauior 
,,, the San Andreas Fault 
System All.»n < ■ I indh. 
,u..logist. US Geological 

Survey. 

Oct. 25: Earthquakes in 
'Stable" Continental Areas: 
What Can rhey Do to I 
and What Are the Hazards 
for New York City? Klaus 
Jacob, senior research sci. u 

tist at Lamont Doherty Earth 
Observatory of Columbia 
University, and Leonardo 
Seeber. associate research 
scientist at Lamont Doherty 
I ai ili Observatory. 

Nov. 1: What Can We Do 
..h.wii I iirl/icjuakc'.s ' Lloyd 
(lull manager of the Depart- 
ment of Geosciences a1 Pa- 
ul u GasandEleitn. 
Company, commissionei 
the California Seismic Safety 
Commission, and presldenl ol 
the Earthquake I n'lineering 
sean h Institute 
Oct. 29 Saturday Fu hi 
Trip. 8:00 a.m. -o 30 p m 
I 'utiupante travel north 
through the Hudson Rli 
V.,u.-v to vievi local bull 
thei geological feat' 
Guide I .•.•nardoSer 1 



Plants of the 
Wetlands 

Five Mondays. 
Oct. 24-Nov. 21 

.0-4:00 p.m.. or 
five Thursdays. 
Oct. 27- Nov 17 
7:00-8:30 p.m. 
$31.50 for Members. 
$35 for non-Members 

William Schiller, lecturer in 

botanv m the Department of 
Education, presents this se- 

1 Bog Plants m New 
England. Carnivorous plants, 
bog orchids, cranben-ies. and 

peat moss 

2 Southern Wetlands. 
Botany in the Okefenokee 
and southern New Jersey. 

3. Lake-shore and Marsh 
Plants. The role of cattails 
arrowheads, and smartweeds. 

4 Swampland Vegeta- 
(l( ,n. Red maple, pussy wil- 
low, skunk cabbage, and 
associated plants in the 
Northeast. 

5. Seaside Plants Stabiliz- 
ing vegetation of coastal 
dunes, salt marshes, and 
rocky headlands 



Wonders of 
Metropolitan 

New York 

Two Tuesdays. 
Oct 25 and Nov 1 
7.00-830 p.m. 
$18 for Members 
$20 for non-Members 

Sidney S Horenstein, geol- 
ogist and coordinator of envi- 
ronmental public programs at 
the Museum, discusses local 
i nvironments and history. 
Oct. 25. Hudson Riuer 
Geology. Follow the beauMul 
and historic Hudson from its 
source in the Adirondack to 
Its mouth In New York Har- 
bor and see how it changes as 
it flows through seven distinc- 
tive geologic provinces. 

Nov 1. Geology of the 
Revolutionary War In 
Metropolitan New York. 
Discover how geology played 
a crucial role In determining 
where many Revolutionary 
War events occurred — e.g.. 
the crucial role of the Pal- 
ides m the fall of Fort Lee 
I the evacuation of W 
ington's troops to the south 



steppe peoples with their 
sedentary neighbors (see 
page 1 for further details 
about the exhibition) Mon- 
day Oct. 3. Wednesday 
Oct. 5, or Friday Oct 7, 
700-8.30 p.m. $12 per 
tour (limited to 25 adults, 
no Members' discount). 

Fall Botany 
Walking Tours in 
Central Park 

A two-hour morning walk 
in Central Park observes signs 
of fall in the flowers and 
trees. Participants will learn 
about plant identification arid 

ecology from William Schiller, 
lecturer in botany in the De- 
partment of Education. Satur- 
days. Sept 24, Oct. Land 
Wednesday. Oct 12. 
9 00-1100 a.m. Limited to 
25 people. $12 per walk; no 
discount for Members. 

Arthur Marks 
Tours 

Sunday, Oct. 9: The Amer- 
ican Museum of Natural 
History and Its Neighbor- 
hood. Participants will start at 
the Museum and walk south 
to see Shearith Israel. New 
York's oldest Jewish congre- 
gation. They'll continue west 
to end the tour at Lincoln 
Center, where they'll see the 
Metropolitan Opera House, 
the State Theater, and Avery 
Fisher Hall. 

Sunday. Oct. 23: The East 
Sixties: High Aspiration 
Amid Grandeur. The tour 
will begin at Hunter College 
and head south past the 
Catholic Church of St. Vin- 
cent Fen-er, one of Franklin 
Delano Roosevelt's town- 
house dwellings. Temple 
Emanu-El and the Seventh 
Regiment Armory It will 
conclude at the Metropolitan 
Club at Filth Avenue and 
60th Street. 

All tours will take place 
from J 30-3:30 p.m., rain 
or shine. $20 for both 
walks: $12 for one. 




Gilded copper 
warrior from 
Royal Tombs of 
Sipan 



S^u^eSoX^^SeH^ and ft. 
Mead Festival. 



i Name. 



Address: 



.State: 



.Zip: — 



City: 

Daytime telephone: 

Membership category: 

Lecture Series. Advance registration is requested but 

relation will be accepted on the opening night if the 
! course is not filled. No single lecture tickets are sold in 

adoTne There are no refunds. Children are no admitted 
1 £res ! workshops, or field trips. For further information 
1 call (212) 769-5310. Please pnnt: 



to 



Course 



T5ay~ 



No. tickets 



Hour 
Price (each) . 



Total 



Course Day 
No. tickets 



Hour 



Price (each) 



Total 



i 

| Lecture Series total. 



Royal Tombs of 
Sipan: A Lecture 
Series 

Two Tuesdays, 
Sept. 27 and Oct. 4 

O-8:00 pin 

$18 for Members. 

$20 for non-Members 

Sept. 27 An Introduction 

to Peruvian Archeology. 

Craig Morris.. curator. Depart 

ment of Anthropology. 
Oct. 4: The Metallurgy of 

Ancient Peru Heather 
Lechtman. professor of 
archeology and ancient tech- 
nology at MIT 



Field Trips and 
Tours 

Empires Beyond 
the Great Wall: 
The Heritage of 
Genghis Khan — 
A Special 
Curatorial Tour 

Adam T. Kessler. curator 
of the on nut Gallery 77 
exhibition will COndu 
gallery tour and discuss the 
relationship between the 
objects "ii display and the 
complex interact »ns t if the 



New Fall Weekend 
Whale Watch Off 
Cape Cod 

The search for whales in- 
volves three 4-hour cniises by 
private charter from Province- 
town. In addition to the ma- 
rine biologists aboard the 
boat, two Museum staff mem- 
bers will accompany the 
group: Brad Bumham, senior 
I uctor in natural science in 
the Education Department. 

I naturalist Stephen C. 
Quinn. who will identify 
many species of coastal birds 
thai in" be seen. Friday- 
Sunday. Sept. 23-25 $400 
(double occupancy). Fee 
me ludes transportation, two 

hts' lodging, meals, and 
lectures Limited to 45 
adults. Call (212) 769 5310 
for the itinerary and applica 
tion 



! 1994 Margaret Mead Film Festival 

! Method of payment: _ Check _ MC _ Visa 

i 

', Account no.-. 



Expiration date: 



Month/Year 



Festival Pass 

Number of passes at Members price of $ 40: — 
Number of passes at non-Members' price of $44. _ 
Total amount enclosed. 

I Margaret Mead Film Festival T-Shirt 

I _ Medium _ Large _ Extra-large 
! Number of T-shirts at Members' price of $H-50: — 
! Number of T-shirts at non-Members' price of $13: — 
| Total amount enclosed: 

• Friend of the Festival 

I Number of Friends at $125 each: 

i Total amount enclosed: 

', Mead Festival total. 

i 

; Please send me a complete schedule of films and videos^ 

i 



1994 Margaret Mead Film and Video Festival 



Wednesday, October 12- 
Tuesday, October 18 

Wednesday, Thursday, Monday, 
and Tuesday: 6:30-10:30 p.m. 
Friday: 6:00-8:30 p.m. 
Saturday: 11:00 a.m.-8:30 p.m. 
Sunday: 11:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 



Daily tickets, which go on 
sale on the day of the films 
after 5:00 p.m. on weekdays 
and after 10.30 a.m. on 
weekends, are $7 for Mem- 
bers and students with ID and 
$8 for non-Members. 

A festival pass (valid Octo- 
ber 12-18) is $40 for Mem- 
bers and students with ID 
and $44 for non-Members. 
For further information call 
(212)769-5305. 

Festival passes and Friend 
of the Festival enrollment will 
be available after 5:00 p.m. 
on Wednesday and Thursday- 
Festival passes and daily tick- 
ets can be pre-purchased with 
Mastercard or Visa. For ticket 
charge call (212) 769-5310. 
Please note that tickets are 
non- refundable and passes 
and daily tickets do not guar- 
antee a theater seat for the 
film of your choice All seat- 
ing is on a first-come, first- 
served basis. 



Become a Friend of the 
Festival for a $125 
Contribution 

Benefits include one festival 
pass valid for admission to 
all screenings, one festival 
T-shirt, and an invitation for 
two to the Directors' Recep- 
tion. If you make your contri- 
bution before September 30 
you can reserve a seat for the 
first screening of each day or 
night 



Festival T-Shirt 

These 100 percent cotton 
T-shirts feature the festival's 
distinctive 4-mask logo with 
green or purple print Use the 
coupon on page 6 to order, 
and be sure to specify 
medium, large, or extra-large. 
The shirts are $11 50 each 
for Members and $13 for 
non-Members. 




Wednesday, October 12 



AUDITORIUM 

Film/Photography and 
Culture 

6:30 p.m. The Other 
Shore (Peru Mikael Wis- 



trom. 1992. 84 min. US 
premiere) A troubling essay 
on the ethics of filmmaking 
results when a Swedish pho- 
tographer returns to the 
garbage mountains of Lima, 



The Belovs 




Peru, to revisit the workei 
documented 17 years earlier 
8:30 p.m. Electric Shad- 
ows. (China. Herve Cohen, 
Renaud Cohen. 1993. 26 
min. US premiere) Deep in 
the province of Sichuan, a 
woman and two men travel 
the countryside, climbing 
forbidding terrain to present 
outdoor film shows that link 
up with pre-existing festivals. 
(Repeat: Sunday. Linder) 

9 15 p.m. Fearless — The 
Hunterwali Story (India. 
Rivad Vinci Wadia 1993. 62 
min US premiere) A celebra- 
tion of the Indian cinema's 
legendary stunt actress, Fear- 
less Nadia, who dominated 
the box office in the thirties 
and forties. 



KAUFMANN 
THEATER 

Music. From Celebration 
to Protest 

6 30pm From Shore to 
Shore Irish Traditional 
Music in New York City. 
(MYC Patrick Mullins. Re- 
becca Miller 1993. 57 min. 
Video) A multilayered porii <>n 
of the role of Irish traditional 
music in shaping ethnic iden- 
tity In New York City since 
turn of the century. (Re 
peat: Sunday. Linder) 

7-50 p.m. A Lath S for My 
Heart A UttleforMyG 
A Muslim IA 

(Algerw. jndoff. 

58 min. Video NY | 
In gender-separated Alg< 
women mu-i i own as 



meddahatts perform !• >1 
raucous all-female gatherings 
at which women remove their 
veils and dance. This film 
focuses on one such orchi 
tra. which includes two gay 
men who are accepted In an 
.,11 | ■•male world. (Repeat: 
Sunday, Kaufmann) 

9 id i ) m. Gandy Dane 
(USA Barry Domfeld and 
Maggie Holtzberg. 1994. 30 
min. NY premiere) Bghl 
retired African-American 
railroad track laborers are the 
focus of a collective story of 
working in the segregated 
South before civil rights, or- 
ganized labor, and occupa- 
tional safety standar- 1- 
(Repeat: Friday. Kaufmann) 

9:55 p.m From Little 
Things Big Things Grow. 
(Australia Trevor Graham 
56 min. 1993 Video US 
premiere) Aboriginal musli i in 
and songwriter Kev Carmody 
and his role as a voice of 
protest for black Australia. 
(Repeat. Sunday. Kaufmann) 



UNDER THEATER 

Retrospective: The Films 
of Carma Hinton and 
Richard Gordon 
The Long Bow Trilogy 

(China) 

6:30 pm Introduction ot 

the filmmak. 

m The S 

Do, m excerpt 

A look at tht 
of the stilt dancing festival, 



which was banned luring the 
Cultural Revolution. 

One Village in China 

7 10 pm Smai 
ness Women <>f a Chinese 

Villa 

film explore ihecha igtag 

roles of women in n 

China. (Repeat: Saturday. 

Kaufmann) 

, p ,u A/1 ' hder 
Heaven (1985 58 min.) The 
political is the pei 
viD , ount stories ol 

economic upheaval over th. 
iwo generations 
9 (i pm To Taste a 
Hundred Herbs Gods 

cestors. and Medicine in a 
Chinese Village. (1986 
min.) A close-up 

communll reli ! "' 

medical pra idittonal 

and mi idem 



PEOPLE CENTER 

Representations of 
Shamanism 

10 p m Surolvoi 

Rainforest (Ven< 

lllllngs lacquesl tool i"' 
50 nun Video. USpt 
The Yan 

Ite their enemies to settle 

7 4i, hamanU 

Medium o] '"■■■ 

iroOmon 19 

ou i World premi 
Villagei 

■ 

Rod i Repeat) 



Thursday, 
October 13 

AUDITORIUM 

Family Scries: Sisters, 
Mothers, Wives 

6:30 p.m. The Good W 
of Tokyo. (Japan. Kim 
I ,.,-,qinolloand Claire Hunt 
192, 52 min ) Pop singer. 
>0p.m Th 
(Russia Victor Kossakovsky 
and 

white NYpn 
comedic depiction ol 

family lif< oi 




Greetings from 
Out Here 



brothers who live in a rural 
community in Russia. 

9:10 p.m Our Way of 
Loving. (Ethiopia. Joanna 
Head. Jean Lydall. 1994 

,,in US premiere) This 
Rim, a follow-up to Two Girls 
Go Hunting, revisits Sago 

I Duka and explores their 
marriages and family prob- 
I. mi-, in the remote southwest 
of Ethiopia (Repeat: Tues- 
day. Kaufmann) 

KAUFMANN 
THEATER 

Peru Today 

6:30 p.m. Transnational 
Fiesta: 1992. (Peru. Wilton 
Martinez, Paul Gelles. 60 
mm Video NY premiere) 
This film explores the mulu 
, uliural and transnational 
expenences of a family of 
Peruvian Andean immigrants 
living in Washington, DC. 

755 p.m. Dancing with 
the Incas. (Peru. John 

hen, 1992. 58 min 1992. 
NY premiere) A look at 
Huayno music, the popular 
music of the Peruvian Andes. 
(Repeat: Saturday. Linder) 

9 L5 p.m. Transnational 
I h sta (Repeat) 



UNDER THEATER 

Retrospective: Films of 
Carma Hinton and 
Richard Gordon 

6:30 p.m First Moon: 
Celebration of a Chinese 



New Year (1984. 37 min.) 
The village of Long Bow 
celebrates the most important 
of traditional festivals 

7:25 p.m. Abode of 
Illusion. (1992 20-min. 
excerpts) 

8:45 p.m. The Gate of 
Heavenly Peace. (Work in 
progress 1904 90 min 
selections of a three-hour 
series) 



PEOPLE CENTER 

Initiation Rites 

6:30 p.m. Reaffirmation 
and Discovery The First 
Pow Wow on Hawaii. (USA. 
Kat High. 1993. 29 min. 
Video) The connections be- 
tween Native Americans and 
native Hawaiians are seen 
through the coming-out cere- 
mony of two young girls 
(Repeat: Saturday, Linder) 
720 p.m The Sunrise 
Dance. (USA. Gianfranco 
Norelli. 1994. 29 min. Video. 
US premiere) The puberty 
rite of a 13-year-old Apache 
girl on an Arizona reserva- 
tion (Repeat: Saturday. Lin- 
der) 

8:10 p.m. Ou>u: Chidi 
Joins the Okoroshi Secret 
Society. (Nigeria. Sabine Jell- 
Bahlsen. 1994 55 min 
Video. World premiere) The 
initiation of a young boy into 
a men's secret society that 
plays a significant role in the 
community's culture. 

9:30 p.m. Owu: Chidi 
Joins the Okoroshi Secret 
Society. (Repeat) 




Saturday, 
October 15 

KAUFMANN 
THEATER 

1 1 00 a.m. The Sultan's 
Burden. (See Friday, Kauf- 
mann) 

15 p.m. God's Alca- 
traz. (USA. Bons St. ml 
1993 16 min Black and 
White US premiere) An 
African-American community 
leader and pastor, Johnny 
Ray Youngblood is a propo- 
nent > il segregation as the 
means to rehabilitate a black 
community. 

1 1 p.m. Freedom Ride. 
(Australia. Rachel Perkins. 
1993 56 min. Video. US 
premiere) The director's pow- 
erful portrait of her aboriginal 
father, Charles Perkins who 
was a pivotal figure in the 
Australian freedom rides' of 
1965. (Repeat: Tuesday. 
People Center) 

2:30 p.m. /singiro Hospi- 
tal. (See Friday. Kaufmann) 




Women's Films 

iOp.m. Act of Love 
(I mope. Karin Junger. 1992. 
45 mm Video US premiere) 
This complex film explores 
how the practice of female 
i iic umcision affects African 
women living in Western 
Europe. 

4:35 p.m. Greetings from 
Out Here. (USA. Ellen Spiro. 
1993. 57 min Video) This 
"road trip" film tells of the 
filmmaker's travels across 
the United States to see how 
people view homosexuality 
outside of cosmopolitan 
New York 

5:45 p.m. Something Like 
a War. (India Deepa Dhan- 
raj. 1991. 52 min. Video) In 
1952 the Indian government 
instituted a campaign of 
"family planning" in which 
"motivators compete, often 
through bribery and false 
promises to sterilize women. 

6:50 p.m. Small Happi- 
ness Women of a Chinese 
Village. (See Wednesday. 
Linder) 



UNDER THEATER 

11:00 a.m. Grandma of 
Boats. (See Friday, Linder 
Theater) 

Family Series 

20 p m Something 
Should Be Done about 
Grandma Ruthie. (USA. 
Cary Stauffacher 199 
54 min. Video.) A family S 
si nmgle with an 85-year-old 
grandmother's senility — her 
wrenching loss of autonomy 



and their frustrations resulting 
from caring for a loved one 
who resists and resents their 
attention. (Repeat: Sunday, 
Kaufmann) 

1.35 p.m. Homelands. 
(El Salvador/Australia. Tom 
Zubrycki. 75 min. 1993. 
Video. US premiere) Maria 
and Carlos Robles escaped 
from El Salvador eight years 
ago to a new world in Aus- 
tralia, where they struggle to 
maintain their culture and 
sense of family. (Repeat: 
Tuesday, Kaufmann) 

3 15 p.m. The Sunrise 
Dance. (See Thursday, 
People Center) 

4:00 p.m. Reaffirmation 
and Discovery: The First 
Pow-Wow on Hawaii. (See 
Thursday, People Center) 

4:45 p.m. Copper-Work- 
ing in Santa Clara del 
Cobre, Michoacan, Mexico: 
Artisans Facing Change. 
(Mexico. Beate Engelbrecht, 
Manfred Kriiger 50 mm 

1993. 16 mm. NY premiere) 
The ancient craft of copper- 
working — local artisans re- 
mark on the impact of the 
worldwide recession on their 
art and village. (Repeat: Sun- 
day, Linder) 

600 p m Farl Robinson: 
Ballad of an American (US 
Bette Jean Bullert. 56 min. 

1994. Video) A fascinating 
portrait of the balladeer of the 
American Communist party 
and composer of "Joe Hill 
who became a New Age spiri- 
tualist in later life. 

7:20 p.m Dancing with 
the Incas (See Thursday, 
Kaufmann) 



lsingiro Hospital 



Friday, 
October 14 

KAUFMANN 
THEATER 

6:00 p.m. Gandy Dancers. 
(See Wednesday, Kaufmann) 

6:45 p.m. The Sultan's 
Burden (Nigeria. Jon Jerstad, 
Lisbet Hotedahl. 1993. 48 
min. US premiere) A tradi- 
tional ruler in Nigeria faces 
opposition. (Repeat: Satur- 
day, Kaufmann) 

7 45 p.m. lsingiro Hospi- 
tal (NW Tanzania. Hillie 
Molenaar, Joop van Wijk 
1993. 40 min. US premiere) 
A medical team in the only 
hospital in northwest Tanza- 
nia, one of the poorest re- 



gions of Africa. (Repeat. Sat- 
urday, Kaufmann) 



LINDER THEATER 

Culture Continuity/ 
Culture Change 

6:00 p.m. Grandma of 
Boats. (World. Mark Soosaar. 
1989-93. 64 min. US pre- 
miere) The sacred role of the 
canoe in Estonian. Siberian. 
Northwest Coast, and South 
American cultures. (Repeat. 
Saturday, Linder) 

7:20 p.m. Siberia After 
the Shaman. (Siberia. 
Graham Johnston. Piers 
Vitebsky. 1991. 50 min. 
Video. US premiere) The 
reindeer-herding Evenki re- 
tain their traditions despite 
Soviet pressure. 



Sunday, 
October 16 

KAUFMANN 
THEATER 

11:00 a.m. The Last 
Klezmer — Leopold 
Kozlowski: His Life and 
His Music. (Poland. Yale 
Strom. 1993. 84 min.) Since 




The Last Klezmer 



his escape from a Nazi labor 
camp. Kozlowski has spent 
his life working to maintain 
the klezmer tradition. (Re- 
peat: Sunday, Linder) 

12.50 p.m. From Little 
Things Big Things Grow. 
(See Wednesday, Kaufmann) 

2:15 p.m. A Little for 
My Heart, A Little for My 
God: A Muslim Women's 
Orchestra. (See Wednesday, 
Kaufmann) 

3:35 p.m. Lighting the 
Seventh Fire. (USA, Ojibwa. 
Sandra Johnson Osawa. 
1994. 41 min.) A profile 
of the Ojibways of northern 
Wisconsin, who reaffirm 
their traditions in the face 
of racism and the politics of 
spear-fishing. (Repeat: Mon- 
day, Kaufmann) 

4:20 p.m. Something 
Should Be Done about 
Grandma Ruthie. (See Satur- 
day, Linder) 



UNDER THEATER 

11:00am Copper-Work 
ing in Santa Clara del 
Cobre. Michoacan, Mexico 
Artisans Facing Change. 
(See Saturday, Linder) 

12:15 p.m. From Shore to 
Shore Irish Traditional 
Music in New York City. 
(See Wednesday. Kaufmann) 

130 p.m. Electric Shad- 
ows (See Wednesday. 
Auditorium) 

3 30 p.m. The Last 
Klezmer. (See Sunday. 
Kaufmann) 






8 




Genbaku Shu: Killed by the Atomic Bomb 



Monday, 
October 17 

AUDITORIUM 

Family Scries: 
Men's Journeys 

6:30 p.m. Memories of 
Tata. (Nicaragua. Sheldon 
Schiffer. 1993. 52 min.) A 
portrait of the dissolution of 
an immigrant Central Ameri- 
can family in which a film- 
maker attempts to understand 
his grandfather's embodiment 
of both love and hatred. 

7:50 p.m. Genbaku Shu: 
Killed by the Atomic Bomb. 
(USA. Casey Williams. 60 
min. 1993. NY premiere) 
A soldier who was sent to 
rescue surviving POWs was 
one of the first to witness the 
aftermath of the atomic blast 
that leveled Nagasaki. Haunt- 



ing archival material and a 
Japanese survivor's chilling 
tale connect this personal 
account to the larger horror 
of atomic warfare 

9: 10 p.m. Osaka Story. 
(Japan and Korea. Toichi 
Nakata. 75 min. 1994. World 
premiere) The filmmaker's 
view of his Korean-bom fa- 
ther, a bigamist, and his 
Japanese mother, a quiet 
sufferer, and a family defined 
by its silences. 



KAUFMANN 
THEATER 

Fighting for Our Land 

6:30 p.m. Kahnasatake: 
270 Years of Resistance. 
(Canada, Mohawk. Alanis 
Obomsawin. 1993. 119 



min.) The Mohawk Indians 
protest against a government- 
approved housing develop- 
ment and golf course to be 
built on their land in Quebec. 
Features first-hand footage 
that captures the state of 
siege within the village of 
Kahnasatake and the military 
war zone outside. 

8:45 p.m. MiJ/i Mi Hi. (Aus- 
tralia. Wayne Barker 1993. 
53 min. US premiere) Mil/i 
nnlli means "message." and 
this film is a message from 
the Kimberley people of Aus- 
tralia — an indigenous pro- 
duction for non-indigenous 
audiences that touches on 
contemporary aboriginally, 
colonial and recent history, 
storytelling, and self-determi- 
nation. 

10:00 p.m. Lighting the 
Seventh Fire. (See Sunday, 
Kaufmann) 



UNDER THEATER 

Evening of Films from 
Centro de Trabalho 
Indigenista 

Centro de Trabalho Indi- 
genista (Center for Work with 
Indigenous Peoples) was es- 
tablished in 1987 as a collab- 
orative indigenous media 
program to help document 
communities of the Amazon 
region. 

6:30 p.m. Video in the 
Villages (Video Nas Aldeias). 
(Vincent Carelli. 1989 10 
min.) How four different 
Amazonian native groups — 
Nambiquara, Gaviao. Tikuna, 



and Kayapo — have 
embraced video. 

6:50 p.m. The Girl's Cele 
bration (A Festa da Mooi> 
(Vincent Carelli. 1987. 18 
min.) The documentation of 
a Nambiquara girl's puberty 
rite becomes an act of self- 
reflection as the video is 
viewed by the village. 

7:15 p in Pemp (Vincent 
Carelli, Gilberto Azanha. 
1988. 27 nun ) This film 
documents how Kokrenum. 
chief and keeper of the 
Parakateje traditions, uses 
video to transmit the customs 
to future gem i. ii 

8:00 p.m. The Spirit of 
TV (O Espirito da TV). 
(Vincent Carelli. Dominique 
Gall- ms I'l'K) IS nun) II,. 
Waiapi Indians discuss the 
value of video and television 
not only as a method of pre- 
serving their traditions but 
also as a way to communicate 
to other Indian groups. 

8:30 p.m. Free for All 
in Sarare (Boca Liure No 
Sarare) (Vincent Can.Hi 
1992. 27 min.) A look at 
Amazonian stniggles from the 
inside, this video centers on 
the issue of Indian land rights 
and documents illegal pros- 
pecting and timber farming 
through interviews with Indi- 
ans, Portuguese prospectors, 
and government officials. 

9.15 p.m. Meeting Ances- 
tors (A Area dos Zo'e). (Vm 
cent Carelli and Dominique 
Gallois. 1993. 22 min.) Two 
communities meet through 
video to compare rituals, 
myth, and history. 



Tuesday, 
October 18 

AUDITORIUM 

The Observers/ 
The Observed 

6:30 p.m. Boatman. 
(India. Gianfranco Rosi. 
1993. 16 mm. Black and 
white. 57 min. NY premiere) 
This unusual tour of the 
Ganges with a local boatman 
offers an intimate view of the 
ironic contrasts between myth 



and reality and life and death 
that surround the holy river 

7-55 p.m. Ishi: The Last 
Yahi. (USA. Jed Riffe and 
Pamela Roberts. 1994. 60 
min.) The story of Ishi, her- 
alded by early twentieth-cen- 
tury papers as "the last wild 
Indian." The "sciencizing" of 
Ishi's life by anthropologists is 
explored, both from his per- 
spective and from that of his 
teacher, anthropologist Alfred 
Kroeber. 

915pm. TheBelovs. 
(See Thursday. Kaufman) 



KAUFMANN 
THEATER 

Family Series: 
Outsiders Looking In 

6.30 p.m. An American 
Family. (USA Alan Ray- 
mond, Susan Raymond. 
1971. 58 min.) One of the 
segments from the renowned 
13-part television series. 

7:45 p.m. Our Way of 
Loving. (See Thursday, 
Auditorium) 

9:00 p.m. Homelands. 
(See Saturday. Under) 



UNDER 
THEATER 

Portraits: Individual and 
Community 

6:30 p.m. John Collier. 
Jr.: A Visual Journey. (USA. 
Stephen Olsson, Maria Luiza 
Aboim. 28 min. 1993. NY 
premiere) John Collier, Jr., 
whose hearing was severely 
impaired by a childhood 
accident, learned to com- 
municate with his eyes and 
became a pioneer in the field 
of visual anthropology. 



\S p.m IVe Gather as 
a Family (Eu Jd Fui S 
Irmao) (Vincent Carelli. 
1993 32 min.) A cultural 
exchange between two 
Brazilian tribal groups wh< i 
share o traditional initiation 

rnony. 



PEOPLE CENTER 

Shamans and Cameras 

A Retrospective and 
Symposium 

6:30 p.m. Introduction 
Laurel Kendall 
6:45 p.m. Shamanism 

Fast and Present (Silvn.i 
MihalvHoppol I '"M 
15-min. excerpt. World pre- 
miere) An hlval photograph-- 
and film and contemporary 
Inter lews with leaders in the 
field are featured in a look it 
the history, contii malum, and 
transformation of shamanism 
7:15 p in Pomo Shaman. 
(USA William I leick. Gordon 
Mueller, David Wayne Perl 
and Robert Wall. ion. 

1953 Black and white. 30 
min.) On the Cheyenne 
Reservation a Southwest 
Pomo Indian healer sui ksthe 
pain from her patient during 
a two-night ritual 

8:00 p.m. A Kut in Seoul. 
(Korea. A. Guillemoz and G. 
Vugyas. 1993 15-min 
cerpt. US premiere) The hall 
day-long shamanic seance of 
female shaman Hong la Suh 
relating to a marriage cere- 

n, up in Seoul. 







»- — •&— 



720 p.m. God's Alcatraz. 
(See Saturday. Kaufmann) 

8:15 p.m New Neighbors 
(Nieuwe Buren) (Nether- 
lands. Ireen Van DUshuyzen 
1994. 120 min US pre- 
miere) Members of migrant 
communities of Turks and 
Moroccans talk about r.n imh 
and the future of Europe. 



PEOPLE CENTER 

Fighting for Our Freedom 

6 30 p in Freedom Ride. 
{See Saturday. Kaufmann) 

7 50 p.m. Act of War 
The Overthrow of the 
Hawaiian Nation. (Hawaii 
Puhlpau and Joan Lai 
1993. 58 min.) Hawaii. 1 1 
scholars and activists retell the 
history ol the Hawaiian na- 
tion and its people from a 

1 lawalian perspective. 

9 15 p.m Freedom Ride. 
(Repeat) 



Honorary Chairperson 

Mary Catherine Bateson 

Programmers 

S « hamov 
Nathaniel Johnson It 

Festival Assistant 

Sylvia Moi 

1 1 us program has been 
made possible with gener- 
ous support from the New 
York State Council on the 
Arts ind Natural Heritage 
Trust 



Ishi, the Last Yahi 



FACES: 

The Magazine About People 



1 he Moche of Peru is 
the theme of the September 
1993 issue of FACES 
anthropology magazine for 
youngreaders rhisissui ' 
developed in conjuiKt i. .11 with 

the current Gall. 

Royal Tombs of Sipan. 
features boutthe 

ancienl Moche civilization, a 
vithartifai lues, 

andarei ipe for a Peruvian 
potato feast 

I Ai / S Is i mnied nine 
Hmesa ' obblestone 

Publishing with the coopera- 
tlon American Mu 

im Each Issue explores 
a dill- 'i. mii theme previous 
ies liave examined bread, 
i .1 ni, limbering the 

dead, and hair. 

Oni subscription is 

$21.95 ($H .uliliti.»nal per 
year outside the I 'mted 
States, Canadians, please 
add 7 percent). Semi youi 
check payable to FACES to: 
Cobblestone Publishing. Inc.. 
7 School Si i. ■ t, I '•■ter- 
borough NH 03458 or call 

•1-0115. Back issues 
are available. 




Gold, silver, and lapis head from exhibition 



Fall Children's Workshops 



A Whales Tale 

I (each child must be 
accompanied by an adult) 

Children will help tell the 
tale of a humpback whale's 
i ni. nation from the warm 
waters ol the SOUth to the 
colder northern seas Film, 
song, a take-home sheet ac- 
, U i(l ,i viSlI 1" I'" ' I'»" "' 

Ocean Life are Included Pre- 
sented by Dayna Relst, in 
stunt.. i al the New> 

Aquarium .md . m 

early childhood education. 
Sunday. Oct 16. 
io \0 n 30 a.m. $25. 



Storytime 

Age 5 (each child must I k 
,„ , ompanled by an adult) 
Partu IpantS hear stories 
from around the world, talk 
about myths and learn how 
animals live rhey"ll handle 
specimens and artifa 
latedtol M,vli 

byRonSopvL. instructoi 
the Westside Montessori 
School ' -K-sdays. Oct. 18 or 
25. or Nov. 15 or 22. 
2.30-3 30 p m $25. 



All About Fish 

Age 5 (eat h i hild must be 

lulu 

Ircrt will leam .ibout 
md how I 

1 \n a hands- 
on program that indu 



making fishprints. visiting the 
I lall of Ocean Life, and creat- 
ing fish windsocks. Presented 
by Judith Levy, who has 
taught at the Carnegie Mu- 
seum of Art. Sunday. Nov. 
6 10 30 a m.-noon. $25. 

What Is that Smell? 

Ages 6 and 7 (each child 
must be accompanied by an 
adult) 

A guessing game will teach 
children how the sense of 
smell provides clues about the 
environment They'll make a 
(nut pomander and decorate 
a container to hold potpourri 
Presented by artist and 
craftswoman Robin Otton. 
Sunday. Oct 23. 
in 30 LI Mam $25. 

How the Fox Got a Huge 
Mouth: Storytelling 
through Dance 

Ages 6 and 7 

I hildren \plore a variety 
of animal characters through 
folktales and movement, and 
they II make animal props for 
each character [he pn 
will i in ,i short pi 

formani > foi Families that 
concludes the program. Per- 
formance time is l 00 p 

IV 

toi foi the Debra 
v\ eCompai 

, Nov. 6 
o m I 30 p m $25. 



Slabsides 
Day 



John Burroughs 
(1837-1921) was a leading 
literary critic and a pioneer in 
the new school of nature 
writing. The John Burroughs 
Association maintains Slab- 
sides, the rustic cabin where 
Burroughs studied nature and 
wrote some of his essays 

Join the friends of the asso- 
ciation on Saturday. October 



1, for a program at Slabs i. 
The open house, which will 
feature free talks and nature 
walks in the sanctuary, will 
begin at noon. 

Slabsides is located in Wesl 
Park, New York, on the Hud- 
son River, 80 miles north of 
New York and 10 miles south 
of Kingston. For more infor- 
mation call (212) 769-5169 




John Burroughs fishing in Esopus Creek 



How We Hear and How 
We See 

Ages 7 and 8 

Exciting expenments fo- 
cused on vision and hearing 
are featured in a workshop in 
which children make drums 
and kaleidoscopes Presented 
by Dina Schlesinger. com- 
puter science teacher, PS 
140. Sunday. Oct 16. 
10.30 a .in -1 :00 p.m. $25 

Drawing Early Mammal 
Fossils 

Age 8 

Children learn the funda- 
mentals of drawing with pen 
and ink. watercolor 
techniques, and contour 
drawing. They will study basic 
mammal anatomy and sketch 
in the Hall of Early Mammals. 
Presented by Angela Tripi- 
Weiss. art director at PS 87 
Sunday. Nov. 6. 10.30 
a.m. -I. -30 p m. $25 

Microscopic Adventures 

Ages 8- 10 

The miniature world of fish, 
scales, feathers, fur, crystals. 
and lnse< is comes to life 
under the microscope. Partici- 
pants can bring their own 
dust bunnies oi small ob- 
u under thi 
I by Uta 
educator 
in the Education Departn 
Saturday. Nov M 

a.n " $25. 



Human Origins 

Ages 10-12 

Children study human ori- 
gins using museum casts of 
fossil ancestors to broadly 
trace our evolutionary lineage 
and those of other primates. 
A session in the laboratory 
using skeletal material of both 



modern humans and chim- 
panzees will help to define 
their connections, similarities, 
and differences. Presented by 
Anita Steinhart. physical an- 
thropology doctoral candi- 
date Two Sundays. Oct. 16 
and 23. 10:30 a.m -12:30 
p.m. $30. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
Workshops for Young People 

I would like to register for the following workshop(s); 



Workshop: 
Workshop. 



Student's last name: 



First: 



Age: 



Grade; 



Parent's last name: 



First 



Daytime phone (area code): — 

Address: 

City: State: 



.Zip:. 



Total amount enclosed: 



Method of payment Q Check QVisa DMastercard 
Credit Card No.: 



Expiration Date Month.. 



Year 



Register early. Class sizes are limited. Separate check per 
workshop or course. Please note that due to limited 
registration discounts are not available for these 
workshops. Send this coupon with your check or money 
order payable to the American Museum of Natural Hisl 
and a self-addressed, stamped envelope 
Worksh Young People. Department of Educai 

American Museum of Natural History 79th Streel and 
Central Park West, New York. NY 10024-5192. 






10 




Caravan from the Morden-Clark Asiatic Expedition of 1926-27 



Highlights Tours 



A two-hour walking tour 
uncovers the origins of the 
largest natural history collec- 
tion in the world. The Ameri- 
can Museum. From History 
to Legend will tell the tales of 
men and women who risked 



lives and fortunes to explore 
the ends of the earth, and it 
will bring to light many of the 
hidden stories behind the 
Museum's treasures. 

The free tours will take 
place on Friday, September 



9, at 6:00 p.m.. and Satur- 
day, September 10, at 4 00 
p.m. The tours will convene 
at the entrance to the Hall of 
African Mammals on the 
second floor. For more infor- 
mation call (212) 769-5562. 



Roy Chapman 
Andrews would 
be proud of our 
new Museum 
Expedition Hat" 

For 125 uii-. id 

in Muwum 

ol Natural Hmorj haw 
ii elements, 

I tl 

In then «| 

the (lobe, the) would don 

btimmcvii3in.ishjt la 

. i,i comfort 
foi I 
thisclassii ' "-id 

ii K< youtl 

American Museum of Natural History 

Central Park Weil •». 79th Street, NY. NY. 10024 1-8004S2 

r --- 

i Expedition Hat 



\Xixn b\ Rich 
legendary Muwum 
, Kploren u Ro) 

dupnun V 
— viid i" k the 
ii fbi 
■■ ^i i 
"Irnluni |ones"— 
expeditions 

Mongoli ' in the 

mywnei Ii n id ol 100% 
natural, doubh thicl 

shrunk >."' 1 "" can\ 
iruresi 

mclv 



10 with ad|uvtablf 
icdloch ii crushes 
ol ill, 
ouh puulu* heneir 
Muscun md rJbx 
ditions launched cocl - 

The American Museum 
of Natural History 
expedition Hat. J29 

Add U 

handlii 

To order , call toll-free: 

1 800-8520925 

Maioi credit 

\\i w 

- 
days fi 




Name: 



Expeditions of Discovery 



! Address: 



City: 



.State. 



.Zip: 



We are looking for volun- 
teers to work in Expeditions 
of Discovery, an exciting new 
Museum venture to be 
launched next month as part 
of our 125th anniversary 
celebration. These specially 
selected and trained volun- 
teers will assist visitors on a 
quest for Museum treasures 



by answering questions, pro- 
viding guidance, and distribut- 
ing materials to Museum 
explorers. They will be sta- 
tioned at a base camp or at 
one of eight field stations 
located on all four floors of 
the Museum 

Expedition volunteers must 
contribute either a 3.5-hour 



engagement each week on a 
weekday or a 3.5-hour com- 
mitment on alternate week- 
ends. Training is mandatory 
and will begin after accep- 
tance into the program. 

For further information and 
an application, call Donna 
Sethi of the Volunteer Office 
at (212) 769-5523. 



Daytime telephone: 



! Size (S-XXL): 



! Total amount enclosed (include sales tax. if applicable):. 



! Please make your check payable to the Amert an Museum ■ 4 
! Natural History and mail with coupon to. AMNH Expedition 
! Hat Central Park West at 79th Street, New York. NY 
! 10024-51" 



American Museum of Natural History 

FIRST ANNUAL 
FAMILY PARTY 

Wednesday, October 19 
6:00-8:00 p.m. 



Arts and crafts, science and educational activities, 

treasure hunts, entertainment, music, 

festive food 

For more information, please call 
(212)769-5166 



AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL 

HISTORY 

CELEBRATES ITS 125TH 
ANNIVERSARY 

with the 
First Annual 

Family Party 

Wednesday, October 19 

Please send me (indicate how many ol eae 1 i) 
—Children's ticket(s) at $35 each 
__Adult ticket(s) at $75 each 
ZFamily package (any combination o! 4 tickets) at $200 each 

Enclosed is my check for $ 
(Each ticket is tax dedu. i:! >■$>) 

_Please send me an invitatii in 



Please print: 






Name 



Address. . 
City: 



.State . 






Daytime telephone-. ■ — 

Please make checks payable to the Amencan Museum , 
Please mane cneci^ way Amerk.m Museum of Natm-.l I 

mail with coupon to The Fan, N i,v«rl NY I .192 

tory. Central Park West at 79th Street. New York. NY lUU^l &l*4 



11 



The First 125 Years 



Eco Impact Forum 




A special exh.bi.ion of specimens and !*«££'*' ££Z°fitnS 125 
Museums arau^.h and deve' opm e n ,from ^ £ £ Kd onThe second /.oor. 
Years u.i/1 open nexl mon.h In the hall o/ Bjrdso) •»' rfj , ,„ 

ttaazssrs: AK^K^^su- on *. ***, 

EastmanPomeroy Expedition of 1 926-27. 



Learn and Teach Origami 



In foese special classes for 
volunteers, origami specials 
Michael Shall will Instnu I 
beginners in the art ol fold- 
ing. Students start with simple 
model. I,. van, sail- 

boat, and jumping frog and 
progress t< > more complicated 
models like the flapping bird 
and omega stai 

The sessions will be con- 
ductedfrom6 30 to 8:30 

p.m On mx Wednesdays: 

! 1 , October 5. 
12. and 26, and November 2 
and 9. Please note that thi 
, lasses an progressive: each 
on builds upon teachings 
from the previous cl i 

ii„ i lasses are tree, with 
all materials provided. In ex- 
change, stud. Hi' .in- expec- 
ted to repay the 12 i 
hours as origami volunteers, 
helping teach at the annual 
Origami Holiday Tree as well 
as the spring and summer 



origami tables. The teaching 
tables are staffed at all times 
during Museum hours in the 
holiday season, including 
weekends and evenings. 
Enrollment is limited to 25 



students and open only to 
those who have never partici- 
pated in this program. Regis- 
tration is on a first-come, 
first-served basis. To register, 
call (212) 769-5566. 



Young Members' Birthday Parties 
at the Museum 

Celebrate Your Birthday with Relatives and Friends 



We'll provide the relatives 
extind "tics thai is Many 
oj these l.miolks will be 
strangers, and others will |ust 
be strange, and you'll do a 
little climbing through their 
family trees At the new Lila 
Acheson Wallace Wing of 
Mammals and Their Extu 
Relatives, you'll get acquainted 
with some prehistoric beasts 
like mammoths, mastodons. 
,»i id saber-toothed cats and 
discover which i il these crea- 
tures are gone forever and 
which have modem cousins. 



You bring the friends (and 
the cake), and we'll play 
games, make a mammalian 
family memento, and party 
away for two hours. It will be 
a birthday that won't fade 
into oblivion! 

The Membership Office 
sponsors other theme paitu is 
for Members between the 
ages of 5 and 1 that focus 
on dinosaurs. African mam- 
mals i e] itiles and amphib- 
u i is, ocean dwellers, and 
Native Americans 
The group should be no 



fewer than 10 and no more 
than 20 The fee is $275 plus 
$15 per child and covers all 
materials and the services of a 
Museum party coordinator. 
The coordinator will help you 
I 'Lin a party that suits your 
child's tastes and will handle 
everything from candles to 
party favors All you need to 
do is bring the cake and help 
escort the guests. 

For more information 
about the birthday parties. 
I all the Membership Office at 
(212) 769-5542. 



On Thursday. September 
29, at 630 pm.. lecturer 
Bob Cook presents Restoring 
Amphibians and Reptiles in 
the Urban Environment. 
Cook is a natural resources 
specialist at Gateway National 
Recreational Park. 

This free program is part of 
an ongoing series of lectures 



that focus on environmental 
issues of concern to the 
greater metropolitan area No 
tickets or reservations are 
necessary for the one-hour 
lecture, which will take place 
in the Under Theater. 

For additional information 
about the program call (212) 
769-5750 



H 
fi 

,/, 

" 

1 1 
//. 

.' 
/. 

I 

s 

I 
I 

I 




DINOSAURS 
ARE THE LATEST 
THING FOR LUNCH! 

Come try DINER SAURUS, 

a fun-loving, fast service eatery that 
literally glows with neon dinosaurs! 

Featuring our 

MEAL-O-SAURUS $5.95 

DINO SIPPERS $1.85 

DINO FRIES $2.25 

And our latest addition: 
LUCKY NICKEL 
BUFFALO WINGS 

Hours. 1 1 am 4;4. r > pm, Mon. - Sun 

. nexl to the Garden I afe 

DINER SAURt is is available 

for birthday parties. 

I'll .i- « ontad our manager at 874-3131. 




SAURUS 

1 r*sr stnviq uamv 




Our charming little shirt features a browsing Apatosaurus 
whose long tail winds around to the back. 

Handmade batik on preshrunk and colorfast 100°* cotton. Soft blue dino 
on rich cobalt blue background 

Please specify S(Toddler). M(3-4) or t(5-6). 

To order, send $21.00 for each (includes shipping and handling within US) «° 

Members Choice Collection 

American Museum of Natural History 

Central Park West at 79th Street 

New York. New York 10024 

for Mastercard/Viva orders, please call 212 769 SSJO 



12 




W AMERICAN M US 
■/ ^1 Exploring tl 



EUM OF NATl) 



Exploring the world with expert lecturers 



RAL HISTORY ~/ 

\ Iprtiirprs i r 1 







DISCOVERY 
CRUISES 

u, IIS , a rangt oj w ssels iiu luding 
icebreakers expedition ships and 
deluxe yachts to bring museum 

,,,,,,/, ,s the most • xtens'm and 

,,„,, , ruist s available I a< h 

, ru j SI is ,/, signed exclusively foi 

wi\li t nul a comprehensive 
,„„/ stimulating enrichment pro 

, M /,,//., a distinguished team 

\ m , rii an Museum and guest 

irers 

IMAGES OF INDONESIA 
Sept. 17 -October I, 1994 

phe extraordinarilj diverst natural 

and ( ultural traditions ol 
iins nation ol islands includ 
Bali, Sulawesi, Salayar, Kabacna, 
M,,,. I omblem Savu and 

iodo 
Ship: 66 cahm ( ah donian Stai 
Price: $6.600-$9 100 pel person 

JOURNEY OF ODYSSEUS 

October 12-28, 1994 
\ n e xciti reation ol the leg- 

I.,,, joumej "i I Idysseus 
Ihrough the Mediterranean to 
Istanbul froj Mycenai Malta 
funis, Bonifacio, Monu Circeo, 

•Han Islands l orfu Ithaca and 
Vthcns. 

Ship: 93 cabin Stella Maris 
Price: $6.307-$7.607 per person 

(;\l.\l»\GOS ISLANDS 
AND QUITO 
January 6-18, 1995 and 

.lanuan 13-25, 1995 
tortoises turtles marine and land 
iguanas, sea lions a magnificenl 
array ol birdlife and dramatic vol- 
. mic landscapes on these remote 
and unique islands. 
Ship: 20-cabin Isabela H 
Price: $4,990 per person 



DISCOVERY CRUISES 
AND TOURS 



rhe American Museum of 

Natural History, a leadci m 
scientific exploration through 
out its 125-year history, creat- 
ed the fiisi museum educa- 
tional travel program in the 
country in 1953. Reflecting 
American Museum exhibition 
and research interests. Dis- 
ry Cruises and Tours give 

ocipants .^ opportunity to 
the world's greatest 
wildlife areas, archeological 
sites and exotic cultural cen 

lets in the compam •>! distill 
lied scieniists and educ- 
ators had) lour reflects OUI 

commitment to furthering m* 
educational experience lor par 
dcipants through •> iirst-hand 
understanding and apprecia 

linn Ol the natural world 

American 
Museum of 
Natural 
History 

Discovery Tours 

C«ntral P«rv Wesi ai 79th Street 

NewYortiNY 10024-5192 

roll-tree (800) 462-8687 
(212) 76S-S700 m New VorV 




SACRED CITIES OF 
SOUTHEAST ASIA 

Jan. 9 -Feb. 1. 1995 

Ancient cities and archeological 
sites "i Indonesia. Malaysia 
Vietnam and ' ambodi i including 
Hah Borobudur, Prambanan 
Pontianak, Kuching Ho I hi Minh 

i ia Nang Hoi ^n Hue 
Hanoi Phnom Penh and Vngkor 
ship: 70-cabin Bali Sea Dam ei 
Price: IBA. 

SAILING THI 
CARIBBEAN 

Aboard the Sea Cloud 
January 19-26, 1995 

Marine mammals, seabirds, snoi 
keling volcanoi : bubbling ;ul 
phut springs colonial towns and 
ra in forests, using a 4-masted "' 
sail barque as oui ba 
Ship: J5-cabin Si a Cloud 
Price: S3 72"/ s7 112 pei person 

BAJA WHALE 

tt XI 'CULM . I A PtUlJK ) N 



February 21 - March 2. 1995 
Grej whales congregating foi then 
breeding season, desert land 
scapes, dramatic mountainous 

i oastlines, unusual plants and a 

wide variety ol hud spe< ies 

Ship: 36-cabin Sea Lion 

Price: $2,762 $ ; 962 pei person. 



DISCOVERY 
LAND TOURS 

Pal from thi standard tourist 
track our haul tours a 
to provide a small group oj frovt I 
, 1 1 with an in-depth and enriching 
travel • xper'u m • Study leaders 
ar t r< /. i ted foi theii < xtensm 
knowledge oj thi dt stinations and 
theii desire to shan this knowh 
with museum travi lers 

TIBET: Journey to the 
Roof of the World 
September 2-19, 1994 

rhe unparalleled magnificence ol 
I ibet's mountainous landscapes, 
with visits i<> I hasa I 
Xigaze and G is well as 

and 

Beijing 

l», l, , | rson round 

trip from New "> a 

MOROCCO: rhe Road 
of a Thousand Kasbahs 

Sept. 24 -Octobers, 1994 
Palaces mosques, souks I 
us in Rab 

Met m i I im I i ; 

,,i a rhousand Kasbahs raroudani 

and Marrakesh 

Price: $5,573 pei person round 

trip from New t ork 

BOTSWANA: 

Desert and Delta 
ScpLilL? October 15. 1994 

\ study of Botswana incredible 
biodivsersitj while exploring 
diverse i >sj stems such as the 
lushOkavango Delia, the Rood 
plains "i Moremi I lame Res 
and stark Makgadikgadi Pan in the 

Kalahari Desert 

Price: $9,650 pei person 




NATURAL TREASURES 
OF COSTA RICA 

I cbruan 4-16, 1995 

i. in oi flora and fauna 
found ai Montevt tdi I loud 

Poas Volcano 
l .i Selva Sarapiqui and 
forti 

Price: $3.77 i pei person round 
trip from Miami 

SOUTHERN IND1\ 
A Cultural Pilgrimage to 
the Land of the Ramayana 
Februarj 4-22, 1995 

lure and wildlift o1 southern India 
with visits to Madias Ban 
Mudumulai National P 

on i >. im. Goa Bom 

and Aui 

P,-„ , 9 | pi i |h i ion round 

trip from Ni '■■ fori 

THE PATAGONIAN 

WDLSOFCHll I 
Februan 7-21. 1995 

Southern < bile s wind swt pi 
plains mountain fjords 

Citii i [OWn lh( I ai. I Iran. I an.l 

magnificenl I d< I Paine 

National P 

Price: • 6 "' pei person i d 

trip from Miami 




NEW ZEALAND NATURAL 
HISTORY EXPEDITION 

February 22 - March S. 1995 

Fjords, geysers glaciers, moun- 
tains volcanoes, rare birds, marine 
mammals and Other wildlife on an 

exciting expedition focusing main- 
ly ( .n the beautiful South Island 

ship: 19-cabin Professoi Shokalski 
Price: $6,990-$7,990 per person 

NATURAL TREASURES 
OF COSTA RICA 
AND PANAMA 
March 15-25, 1995 

Magnificent national parks and 
remote areas including Manuel 
Antonio, Marenco Biological 
Reserve, Corcovado, Isla Coiba 
National Park, the Danen Jungle 
and the San Bias Islands plus two 
transits through the Panama Canal 
Ship: 41 -cabin Polaris 
Price: $4.392-$6.822 per person. 

ISLAND WORLD 
OF JAPAN 
April 14-26, 1995 
Ancient and fascinating i ities in 
eluding rokyo, Kamakura Kj 
Nara. Aburatsu. Kagoshima and 
Nagasaki, as weU as the incompa- 
rable beaut) ol Japan i Inland 
Ship: 60-cabin Oceanit Graa 
Price: from about $5,890 per per- 
son, round-trip from I os Angeles 



HIMALAYAN WILDLIFE 
India and Nepal 
November 3-21, 1994 

Wildlife and exotic cities in om ol 
the world's remotest regions with 
visits i" Chitwan National I'ark. 
Ranthambhore riger Reserve, the 
tabled cit) "i Katmandu in Nepal 

and a special visil tO the PUShkBJ 
Camel hair 

Price: $6,882 pet person, round- 
trip from New York 

HOLIDAYS IN KENYA 
Dec. 20, 1994 - Jan. 3, 1995 
I lephants, lions, leopards. 
giraffes and much more in 

Kenya S renowned national parks, 
including the Aberdares. Samburu, 

Lake Baringo i ake Nakuru and 

Masai Mara 

Price: $5.22^ per person, round 

inp from New York 

AROUND THE WORLD 

Bv Private Jet 

January 19 -Feb. 21, 1995 

A unique adventure b> private jel 

retracing me steps ol \MNH 

expedition pa i Uld present, to 

Cuba, Amazonia I ll,ul 

Rarotonga New Guinea, Bom 

China. Mongolia. Myanmai, 
M ai |, i.ni/jnia and 
Pordogne I ranee 
Price: $34,950 pel pa 



DISCOVERY 
TRAIN TRIPS 

privately i he 

trains, museum in :h1, 

to ( omfortably • rptort r, n 
.. n mat 1 1 ssibh by o 
mod* i oj transportation M e « '// 
traverse somi o) lfa world i most 
M rail routi i aboard i ft 
lantly r< stored trains i quippt d 
with first class fat ilitu i 

BEIJING rOMOSCOVl 
September 15-30, 1994 

1 1, ip ( i tig i md i itii 

and towns along the gn ii rail 
i of < inn i Mongolin -^<^ 

Russia in< lud Beying I rlian 

th< I lobi i Ian Batoi ' lanl 

■ ,i W hi 
\ irosla> i and Moscow 

I i .im I I 
Pm 

BEUING TO HANOI 
October 25 - Nov. 12. 1994 
nd stunning laud 

l| ( lun. i and V i. mam 

im luding Bi ijing Xi in 
Chengdu Kunming I iuilirt H 

and Haiphong plus Hong K 

and an optional posi trip i uen ion 
to Saigon and Vngl oi ^ ai 
Train: < hino Orient I 
Price: $7,950 per pei 

isi will 1 rODAMAS< I S 
Vpril 20 Maj 4, 1995 

ircheological iti 
.,ii,i stunning land m luding 
i itanbul i phe; u Vphrodi 
I'.im ' kali Hit ropolis, Kon 
l appadot ia Vntioch Vleppo 
ii. ,ma Palmyra < ru ladi i « astlcs, 
Maalula and I >amascus 
I .am inatolian I ■/" 
Price: $6 590 $7,990 i son 



THE PEOPLES OF BALI: 
Traditions and Beliefs 

February 22 - March 5, 1995 
An intensive examination ol the 
cultural md artistic heritage ol 

Bali with perlormam e demon 

strations, workshops and dail) 

excursions into Ihe island ( 

exquisite countryside 

Price: $3,395 per person, round 

trip from I Nir'eles 

ANCIENT CIVILIZATIONS 

OF MEXICO 

March 3-15, 1995 

ii„ magnificenl cities and 

lial centers ol Mexico's 

ancienl civiliations ia luding 

Palenque, rcotihuacan I I lajm 

i tea Zapoti San I or nzo, 
Bonampak md V axchilan 

Price: $3,195 pel person 

THE PEOPLES OF 

TANZANIA: Traditional and 
Contemporary Lifestyles 

March 3-19, 1995 

An intensive examination ol 
lifestyles ol differeni remott p 
pics ol northern ranzania as well 

i ildlife 
refuges of N Cratei and 

thi s, ,, ngeti Plains. 
Price: sx>is7 per person round 

trip from New Ynrk 



FOR MORI INFORMATION 



mailing cosi prohibii 

i 'ii brot i" 

oat >ui li i 

Ml ,r. noi BUtomatii til 

thing PI i lis) below 
, m , i >du would 

, ifii all) lik" a We will 

mail thees brochu fliej 

i /ailabl 

month - partur 

G General Brochur (a list ol 

highlights an.l COStS I"' ill 

trips) 

D Spccil ll1 ''' 1 

inn' 

.mm i"i the folio 



| Please i 

ould i'i e and mail Ihia 

ip o r) i""i 

! Brochures ihoud be seal toj 

! Name - 

j Street . 

ry: . 

; State/Zip: 



i,i 
i 






13 



Courses for Stargazers 



* 



• 



. . 



li 



• • 




ASTRONOMY: BASIC 
COURSES 

Introduction to 
Astronomy 

Eight Mondays, beginning 
Sept. 19 or eight Tuesdays, 
beginning Sept. 20; 
,, ;n 10 p.m 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Memb. 

A first course in astronomy, 
designed to introduce the 
many interesting aspects of 
lh, universe to those without 
a math or physics back- 
ground. Topu mil hde earth 

as a planet, the moon, the 
em the stars, the 
Milky Way. galaxies, quasars, 
and black holes. Common 
observations such as planet 
motions and the using and 
setting of the sun and moon 
are explained. No previous 
knowledge of astronomy is 
assumed The course serves 
as a prerequisite for the inter- 
mediate level courses. 

Adventures in Astronomy 

Five Saturdays, beginning 
Sept. 24; 9-.40-11--40 a in 
$67.50 for Members 
$75 for non-Members 

Confused about the differ- 
ence between a star and a 
plane! ' t an I tell astronomy 
from astrology? Don't know 
Aquarius from Sagittarius or a 
black hole iromabrov 
dwarf 9 Join us for a new 
Saturday course for the whole 
family (ages 10 and up). 
Through the use of the Sky 
Theater, labs, and astronomi- 
cal . quipment. we will ex- 
plore the birth and death of 
stars, the origin of the uni 
verse, the search for extrater- 
restrial life, and the current 
night sky The class meets in 
the Sky Theater for the first 
hour and in Classroom 1 for 
the second hour. Instructor: 
Craig Small. 

How to Use a Telescope 

Eight Mondays, beginning 
Sept 19; 630-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

An introduction to choos- 
ing and using a small amateur 
telescope. Topics include 
optics of telescopes, 
equatorial and altitude-altaz- 
imuth mountings. eyeple< 
collimating a telescope, set- 
ting up for observation, locat- 
ing objects in the sky. and the 
use of charts and other obser- 



vation aids. No previous 
knowledge of astronomy Is 
assumed, and this course is 
particularly recommended for 
those considering the pur- 
chase of a telescope and 
those who have one but 
aren't sure how to use it. 
Instructor; Sam Storch. 



Celestial Highlights 

Four selected Mondays: 
Sept. 19. Oct. 17, Nov. 14, 
Dec 12, 6:30-7:40 p.m. 
$36 for Members 
$40 for non-Members 

This course will focus on 
the interesting and exciting 
events in the skies of the 
coming month. The night sky 
will be accurately simulated by 
the Zeiss projector in the Sky 
Theater, and students will 
leam how to find the promi- 
nent constellations of the 
season and where and when 
to see gatherings of the moon 
and planets. The Planetar- 
ium's extensive collection of 
special effects will illustrate 
upcoming celestial events, 
including meteor showers and 
eclipses. Students will also 
leam about prominent plan- 
ets, current space missions, 
and how to find deep-space 
treasures like nebulae, star 
clusters, and galaxies that are 
visible through binoculars or 
small telescopes. Instructors: 
Joe Rao and Henry Bartot. 



ASTRONOMY: 

INTERMEDIATE 

COURSES 

From Copernicus to 
Einstein 

Six Wednesdays, beginning 
Sept. 21; 6.30-8:40 p.m. 
$76.50 for Members 
$85 for non-Members 

This survey course explores 
four of the great scientific 
ideas that led to revolutionary 
changes in astronomy and 
physics: the mechanical cer- 
tainty of Copernicus' astron- 
omy. Galileo's physics and 
astronomy. Newton's physics, 
and Einstein's relativity of 
time and space. Students 
examine nonmathematical 
presentations of the theories, 
which are placed in historical 
context and represented 
schematically No formal 
training in physics or math is 
required. Instructor: William 
Dorsey. 



Space in Perspective: 
The World Out There 

Eight Tuesdays, beginning 
Sept. 20. 630-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

Michael Allison of NASA s 
Goddard Institute for Space 
Studies conducts this survey 
of the physical universe from 
the perspective of contempo- 
rary space science. Topics 
include recent results from 
COBE. Hubble, and other 
earth-orbiting observatones 
and interplanetary spacecraft. 
This overview begins with the 
physical working of stars and 
galaxies and introduces con- 
cepts of modem cosmology 
and elementary particle 
physics. One evening will be 
devoted to an in-depth con- 
sideration of optional topics, 
guided by the students' inter- 
ests. An illustrated review of 
the solar system, including a 
discussion of extraterrestnal 
weather and geophysics, will 
also be featured. 

METEOROLOGY 

Weather and Climate 

Eight Thursdays, beginning 
Sept. 22; 630-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

Everyone talks about the 
weather. This course is for 
those who would like to know 
more about the atmosphere 
— how it works and how it 
affects us. Topics include the 
structure and motions of the 
atmosphere, climate, weather 
forecasting, and atmospheric 
optics such as rainbows, 
halos, and twinkling stars. No 
formal training in physics or 
math is required. Instructor: 
Barry Grossman. 



instrument competency 
checks and familiarizes VFK 
pilots with instrument tech- 
niques. Subjects include en 
route approach and depar- 
ture procedures, applicable 
federal aviation regulations, 
psychological factors affecting 
pilot performance, and exten- 
sive use of flight computers in 
flight planning. Students may 
use the flight-deck simulator. 
Instructor: Ted Cone. 

NAVIGATION: BASIC 
COURSE 

Navigation in Coastal 

Waters 

Eiqht Mondays, beginning 
Sept. 19; 6:30-9:00 p.m. 
$99 for Members 
$110 for non-Members 

An introduction to piloting 
and dead reckoning for pres- 
ent and prospective owners 
of small boats. The course 
provides practical chartwork 
and includes such topics as 
the compass, bearings, fixes, 
buoys and lighthouses, the 
running fix. current vectors 
and tides, and rules of the 
nautical road. Boating safety 
is emphasized. No prerequi- 
sites. Students are required to 
purchase an equipment kit. 
Instructor: Greg Smith 

NAVIGATION: 

INTERMEDIATE 

COURSES 



AVIATION 

Ground School for Private 

and Commercial Pilots 

Fifteen sessions, Tuesdays 
and Thursdays, beginning 
Sept. 20; 6:30-9 00 p.m. 
$166.50 for Members 
$185 for non-Members 

This course helps private 
and commercial pilots pre- 
pare for the FAA written 
examinations. It can also help 
as a refresher for biennial 
flight reviews, relieve some 
instances of fear of flying, and 
survey some aspects of flight 
training and aircraft owner- 
ship. Subjects include physio- 
logical factors affecting pilot 
performance, visual and elec- 
tronic navigation (VOR, ADF, 
DME, SAT, NAV. GRF, and 
LORAN), charts, publications, 
computers, principles of aero- 
dynamics, weather, instru- 
ments, engine/propeller 
operations, communications, 
regulations, and safety. Stu- 
dents will plan cross-country 
trips and may use the flight- 
deck simulator. Instructor: 
Ted Cone. 

Ground School for 
Instrument Pilots 

Fifteen sessions, Tuesdays 
and Thursdays, beginning 
Sept 20; 6 30-900 p m. 
$166.50 for Members 
$185 for non-Members 

Intended for those planning 
to take the FAA written ex- 
amination for an instrument 
rating This course also pro- 
vides updated information for 



Trouble Shooting 
Celestial Navigation 

Four Tuesdays, beginning 
Sept. 20 or Oct. 18; 
6:30-8-40 p.m 
$67.50 for Members 
$75 for non-Members 

This short course is de- 
signed for students who are 
self-taught or who need prac- 
tice to navigate by the stars. 
Sessions will include a review 
of the basic theory, use of 
Volume 1 HO 249, the Rude 
Star Finder and Nautical Al- 
manac for precalculation of 
star sights, calculation of LAN 
and twilight for star sights; 
review of star sights, moon 



shots, planet shots, and plot- 
ting; and use of celestial com- 
puters, sextants, and shooting 
techniques. Time will be allot- 
ted to address the trouble 
spots that students may have 
encountered. No text is re- 
quired, handouts will be pro- 
vided. Instructor: David 
Berson. 

Introduction to Celestial 
Navigation 

Ten Thursdays, beginning 
Sept. 22, 6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$99 for Members 
$110 for non-Members 

This course is for those 
who have completed Na lega- 
tion in Coastal Waters or 
who have equivalent piloting 
experience. The course cov- 
ers the theory and practice of 
celestial navigation, the sex- 
tant and its use. and the com- 
plete solution for a line of 
position. Problem solving and 
chartwork are emphasized. 
Students are required to pur- 
chase a copy of Sighf-Reduc- 
tion Tables for Marine 
Navigation, Volume 3 (Pub 
No. 229). Instructor: Greg 
Smith. 

Astronomy for Celestial 
Navigators 

Eight Wednesdays, beginning 
Sept. 21; 6:30-8:40 p.m 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

This new course is 
designed for students who are 
already familiar with navigat- 
ing by the stars but want to 
know more about the astron- 
omy behind celestial naviga- 
tion. Topics include systems 
of celestial coordinates and 
the navigational triangle; the 
absolute motions and dis- 
tances of the navigational 
stars, planets, and the moon, 
the motions of the earth in 
the solar system; planetary 
and lunar configurations as 
observed from earth; and 
many other subjects. Intro- 
duction to Celestial Naviga 
tion or equivalent experience 
required. Instructor: Harold 
Pamham. 



! Courses for Stargazers 

! 1 would like to register for the following Planetarium course(s) 

i 

i 
i 



• Name of course: 

Price: Please note that discount prices apply only to 

Participating and Higher Members ) 



i 

| Class beginning: 

i 

i Name: 

i 



Address; 



City. 



.State: 



.Zip: 



Daytime telephone: _ 
Membership category: 



Please mail this coupon with your check payable to th 
American Museum-Hayden Planetarium to: Cours " a ; ut 
Stargazers, Hayden Planetarium, Central Park West at Bi* 
Street, New York. NY 10024-5192. Registration by main* 
strongly recommended and is accepted until seven aay 
preceding the first class. For additional information, call ^ <- 
769-5900, Monday-Friday, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. No creo 
cards accepted. Do not include ticket requests 
checks for American Museum programs. 



_j 



14 



Museum Notes 




Filming the excavation of dinosaur eggs 
during the 1920s expeditions m Mongolia 

Hours 

The Junior Shop 1Q , 0a.m.-4:45 p.m 

^^:::::::::::::::.-.-...io:ooa.rn.-5:46p.rn. 

Th Tues U -Fr Libra ^ . 1100 a.m -400 p.m. 

The Discovery Room 

Closed for the month of September. 
The Natural Science Center 

Closed for the month of September. 



Museum Dining 

Diner Saurus Fast Service Eatery 

Ddlly 1 1 00 a.m.^:45 p.m. 

Garden Cafe 

Reservations. (212) 769-5865 

Lunch. Mon.-Fr, 1 1 30 a m-3: 30 p.m. 

Dmner. Fn. & Sat. ^ 00 ~1™ P ™ 

Brunch. Sat. & Sun 11:00 am -400 p.m. 

Whale's Uir 3:00-8:00 p.m. 

g" t Noon-8:00 p.m. 

Sun. & most holidays . ^fn^OO p.m. 

Snack Carts (at 77th Street & on the first floor of 
the Roosevelt Memorial Hall) 

Sat.& Sun 1 1 00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 



Entrances . 

During Museum hours visitors can enter the 
building through the 77th Street entrance the 
parking lot entrance (81st Streetjor the Roo- 
sevelt Memorial Hall entrance (79th Street and 
Central Park West). Visitors attending pro- 
grams after hours can enter the building 
through the driveway entrance at 79th 
Street and Central Park West. 



Pa The Museum "s parkmg lot is located on 81st 
Street between Centra, Park West one IColur^ 
Avenue Space is limited and available on a first 
Tme fJ-served basis: fees are $12 'for can and 
$11 for buses. The lot is open from 9.30 a.m. to 



Happenings at the Hayden 



Exhibition 



Man on the Moon: The Apollo 
Adventure (through Sept. 30) 

This special exhibition, which marks the twenty- 
fifth anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon anding. 
features replicas of the original Apollo 1 1 lunar 
module, the Eagle, and the Lunar Rover used on 
the moon, that were created with thousands of 
ERECTOR" set pieces. Also on display are memo- 
fab'Sfrom the Apollo flights, Apollo mission pho- 
tos from NASA, and a moon map as wel I as a 
special section devoted to Project Clemenhne. £e 
next mission to the moon, and ar , ongoing i presen 
tation of the award-winning film The Eagle Has 
Landed. 



Sky Shows 

Update: The Universe 

New discoveries from space are revealed 1 on a 
daily basis, including .nforma ion about btecM holes, 
new planets, and colliding galaxies. In this fast 
oa^ed news magazine" presentation you II get an 

aTonomyu^ 

dows on the universe that astronomers have opened 

t !h e e SJSrS?H-c« telescopes such as 
th n Co m pton Gamma Ray Observatory ^ the ^ 
pean ROSAT, and the recently <™7^ "£™ 
Space Telescope have been ^ or ^ iT U Z s % 
from SDace in light that never reaches our eyes, at 
thrsame hme n glnt earth-bound {*"*- ««, 
the heavens, searching for signs of into hgen : Me m 
our galaxy Update. The Universe f P lo ^ s ^ ^ 
edge research from the quest for ^f^^Z 
to studies that peel back time in search of the dawn 

01 Nowhere will be no Sky Show horn Tuesday, 
September 6. through Sunday g^J;*^ 
theater renovations. Please call (214 w 3i 
verify schedule. 
Showtime*: } 30 ^ 3:30 p .m 

q?« i',n I 00 2 00, 3 00, and 4:00 p.m 

SL^IPartiSiSl -d Higher Members): 

Adults: $4 
Children (2-12): $2 



Call (212) 769 -Mm i... Qon^ernl ces 

-iiSati fase ethatpri 

and schedule are subject to change without pi 
notice. 

Children's Shows 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers Children sing along with images of 
Keir favorite Sesame Street Muppets as they learn 
about rainbows, the phases ol th« J™^"™ 

a ^*-.« Qat Ort 8 at 10:30 and 11:^0 a.m.. 

"and Sat Nov ' 5 at 10 30 a.m. Admission fpi I ' * 

ic pa' g and Higher Members ,s $4 for adults and 

$2 for children Members can purchase up to four 

tickets at the Members pnee. 

Shows usually sell out in advance, reservations^ by 
mail only, are necessary Make your check payable 
The Hayden Planetarium (attn: Wonderful Sky. 
Central Park West at 81st Slrcct New York NY 
10024-5192). indicate membership category and a 
nrst and second choice of showt.mes. Be sure to 
^c ude a -Taddressed. stamped envelope and your 
Sme telephone number For additional 
SSonSaH (212) 769-5900 

Robots in Space features Lucasf.lm R^2jd 
C-3PO- and has been created especially for chil 

BBSS** 



Laser Shows 

Journey into another dimension where ****** 

^It-lXa^a good idea to call before visit- 
1 i- Planetarium, since prices, programs 
S*S«SES«! subiect to change without 
noticV For general Planetarium ...formation. 
caU (212) 769-5100. 




930 P m on Sunday through Thursday and from 
9.30a.m to midnight on Friday and Saturday 

Hertz Manhattan, located one block au-av from 
the Museum at 210 West 77th Street ( >. 
Broadway and Amsterdam), offers parking 
discounts to Members on Monday through Friday 
Members receive a $ 

I on Saturday and Sunday they receive a S3 

^cTthe Membership Office at (212) 76*561 MS 
for Information about alternative parkli 



Museum Tours , . 

fr „. MllM „„, Highlights Tours are available to 
individuals and families. Tours Reconducted 
daily at 10.15 and 11:15 a.m. I "« 

3:15p.m. and depart from the second jW b. 
tween the Roosevelt Rotunda and thi Hall of 

African Mammals. .,,,.„... 

Group Tours are available for a fee All Group 
Tow, must be scheduled through the Volunteer 
< „,„,. For details, i ') 769-5566. 



Phone Numbers to-iO\lM ilOO 

Museum information 

Membership informal f/or questions about 

Museum events) I ' " ,UD 

Part,, [pating Members' Customer Service 

(for questions and problems related ft >da 

and Natural History magaz.ne - missed 

f*Zi " i """' I ! 1-AMNH 

information r>\ ■) 769-5900 

Planetarium information 

Education Department.. -.212 769 dW 

DiSC ° V --;: .eNVState: 800 

SSKas Jin 

Volunteer Office... glg76 

Museum Shop 

Library Services . ; , 

Natural Hr,. MM... 

Members BookProgram 1212) 




Zebras cluster together In a tangle 
of stripes to confuse predators 



The new IMAX film Africa The Serengetlex 
pk£s S rilaS .nshi, * between P^Jg^W 

zebras and other animals Showtimes as of 
sVpTemoer 9 are 10 30 and 1 1:30 a m. and 1 30 

cover the wildlife and natural beauty of the national 
park Showtimes are 12 30. 230 and 430 p.m. 
^On Fnday and Saturday at 6:00 and 7 30 p ,„ 
Africa The Serengeti is shown on a double bill 

^Yefo^toners^^^^^fX 

to change without notice. Call (212) 769 boou lor 

further information. M„ m h»rO 

Admission (Participating and Higher Members) 
AdX $4 75 single feature; $6 double feature 
Children $2 25 single feature; $325 double 
feature 



I' 



I 
I 



15 



> to 




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s 



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Fo 






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3. 













icioatinq and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural Histcv 



Vol 19. No. 9 October 1994 






or Participating 




! 









i , ,,, i 



Okavango: Africa's Last Eden 



Thursday, October 6 

7:00 p.m. 

Main Auditorium 

$10 for Members, $15 for non 

When Frans Lanting first visited 
southern Africa's Okavango Delta on 
assignment for National Geographic, 
he envisioned a six-week project. 
Instead, his work blossomed into an 
unprecedented undertaking that 
stretched over two years. He found an 
Africa he thought no longer existed 
a wetland oasis of more than ».buu 
square miles in the middle of 
Botswana's Kalahari Desert with a 



-Members 

remarkable richness and diversity of 

wildlife. , . 

The spectacular photographs he 
took at the Okavango were published 
in National Geographic, helping the 
publication win the National Magazine 
Award for excellence in photography 
and earning Unting the BBC htle of 

Wildlife Photographer of the Year. 
Last year this body of work was 
published as Okavango: Africa s Last 



Eden (Chronicle Books). In words and 
images Lanting tells the miraculous 
story of a river that dies in the desert 
to give rise to one of the greatest 
wedands on the planet. The book .s 

also a personal account of Lanting s 
year among lions, elephants, and 

h ' Lanting will talk with Members 
about his work in Okavango and 
share his photographs of the region s 



landscapes and wildlife, including pi 

tures of leopards, crocodiles zebras, 
qiraffes, hyenas, impalas, and the 
continent's last great unhara^ 
herds of elephants. Copies of In-- 
book will be available for purchase, 
and Lanting will sign copies aftel 

the show 

Use the October Memb-: 

grams coupon on page 3 to register 

foi the program. 






Empires Beyond 
the Great Wall 

Bronze weapons, silk garments 
pottery, porcelain, and gold and silver 
plates and vessels are among the 
sasures of the current 
Gallery 77 exhibition Artifacts from 
the second millennium BC up to the 
era of Genghis Khan and the Yuan 
dynasty of the thirteenth and four- 
teenth centuries are on display in 
Empires Beyond the Great Wall. 
See page 3 for details about Mem- 
bers' tours and a related program 




z 

r 

X 



O-i) n^ 



Royal Tombs 
of Sipan 

A dazzling array of artifacts from 
the richest graves ever ex cavated ,n 
the Americas is on display in Gallery 
3 Royal Tombs of Sipan off. 
nating insights into the lives of the 
Moche. who dominated the coasta 
region of northern Peru from AD 100 

t0 Admission to the exhibition, wl 
will be on display through December. 

>4 for adult Members and $d tor 
Members' children. 




J 



Eyes of the World 

Wednesday, November 9 

7:00 p.m. 

^tt^tllOfomon-Members 



Catch a glimpse of one of 
the world's most phenomenal 
gems -the 18.50 cats-eye 

alexandrite - and meet the 
miner, Henry F. Kennedy. 
This rare gemstone is green 
in sunlight, changes to pur 
pUsh red in candlelight, and 
sports a mesmerizing white 
eye that follows the viewer in 
, ml ' manner as the eyes 
of the Mona Lisa. 

Alexandrite was discovered 
in foe Ural Mountains In 

10 and named after Czar 
Alexander II of Russia. The 
gems colors, red and green 
were the same as those of the 
Russian Imperial Gu. :» 1 1 

Specimens of alexandrite 
with a cat's eye are so rare 
and expensive that most mu- 
seum collections don't pos- 
sess an example. This 
gemstone weighed 73 carats 
In the rough and is reputedly 
the largest and finest of its 



kind ever found in the Ameri- 
cas Its dramatic color change 
is attributable to the trace 
element of chromium which 
also causes the emerald to 
appear green and the ruby 

red u 

Alexandnte is seldom 

encountered in situ, and 
Kennedy will explain how he 
traced the elusive chrysoberyl 
to its source, the granite peg- 
matite He II reveal how the 
cats-eye cutters orientate this 
optical effect, and Members 
will see the rough gem mate- 
rial "come alive 

A New Jersey native, 
Kennedy resides in Brazil. 
Aiier the slide show, the 
audience will observe his 
eye-opening exhibit of 
phenomenal gems, including 
cat's eyes in emerald, aqua- 
marine, chrysoberyl. and 
ruby Use the coupon on 
page 3 to register 




Members' Day Trip to ^ 

Montauk Point 

Saturday, November 19 
7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. 

Appropriate for ages 16 and up 




Henry F. Kennedy 



Female Genital Mutilation 



Wednesday, November 30 

7:00 p.m. 
1 Kaufmann Theater 
£7 for Members, $ 



§ffiE*ST$10 «or non-Members 



Eighty-five to LM million 
girls and women in the world 
undergo some form of genital 
mutilation. M- ist lh/G in 
Africa, a few in A 
Increasingly, there arc mc 
women in Europe, Canada, 
and the United States who 
have suffered 1 1 male genu. .1 
mutilation (FGM). In addition 
to its physical hazards FGM 
represents an extreme exam- 
ple of efforts common to 
societies around the world t< i 
suppress women's sexuality, 
ensure their subjugation, and 



control their reproductive 

functions. 

NahidToubia, a physician 

from Sudan and women's 
health activist, will talk with 

Members about the issues 
surrounding FGM (also called 
female circumcision). She II 

icribe the practice of FGM 
as a coming-of-age ritual and 
its cultural significance in 
relation to ideals of health 
and beauty, religion and 
morality, and male approval 
and protection. The compli- 
cations and effects of FGM. 



which is mainly performed on 
children, will be discussed. 

Toubia is an associate pro- 
fessor at Columbia University 
School of Public Health and a 
member of several scientific 
and technical advisory com- 
mittees of the World Health 
Organization and the Human 
Rights Watch Shell describe 

international attempts to stop 
FGM that focus on changing 
attitudes without threatening 
cultural integrity. 

Use the coupon on page 3 
to register. 



Chemistry for Kids 

$7 for Members, $10 for non-Members 
Appropriate for ages 5-1 Z 
AU attendees must have tickets 



At the ninth annual presen- 
tation of Chemistry /or Kids, 

Patricia Ann Redden will 
demonstrate some fabulous 
chemical transformations 
In the Kaufmann Theater 

These experiments are 

illy designed to ex- 
young people with the r> 

biUties offered by the study of 

■Hi. -ii kids will go to the 
Edith C Blum Let lure Room 
to conduct safe, easy-to-un 
derstand experiments of theii 



own under adult supervision. 
Those who complete the lab 
session will earn a Junior 
Chemist certificate issued by 
the American Chemical Soci- 

. New York Section and 
the American Museum, and 
participants can win prizes 

„, he successful eomple- 
tion of a chemistry quiz that's 
based on Museum exhibits. 
Redden is a professor of 
i hemistry and departmental 
chairperson at Saint Peter s 
College in Jersey City. She 



has had many years of teach- 
ing experience at all grade 
levels and frequently ad- 
dresses high school and col- 
lege science classes in the 
New York area 

Chemistry /or Kids is pre- 
sented in conjunction with the 
American Chemical Society's 
observation of National 
Chemistry Week. Use tl 
coupon on page 3 to register, 
and please note that both 

lldren and adults must have 
rickets 



Visit ice-age Long Island 



It's a mighty long island, 
and Members will traverse its 
•backbone" to the southeast- 
em tip, where a terminal 
moraine (a series of coalesc- 
ing hills) marks the southern- 
most advance of the glaciers 
some 17.000 years ago. 
Geologist Sidney Horenstein 
hosts the excursion, which 
spotlights the island's history 
and geology and explores 
many of the geologic features 
created by the glaciers. 

Long Island has changed 
dramatically since the glaciers 
melted away, and participants 
will see the evidence of the 
island's transformation while 
walking on coastal sand 
dunes, through knob and 
kettle topography, tombolos, 
and steep, wave-cut bluffs 
that rise 30 to 80 feet above 
the beaches. The lush vegeta- 
tion of present-day Montauk 
will be be discussed, along 
with the startling changes it 



has undergone since the end 
of the glacial period. 

At Montauk State Park 
participants will view Mon- 
tauk Lighthouse, which was 
built during the years 
1795-97. The lighthouse 
initially stood about 300 feet 
from the edge of the sea: 
today it's only 60 feet from 
the water's edge. A stop at 
the unusual Shinnecock Canal 
will illustrate its control of the 
local coastal ecology. 

Horenstein is the Museum s 
coordinator of environmental 
public programs and will lead 
the tour rain or shine. Wear 
shoes appropriate for walking 
on sandy and rocky beaches, 
and bring a bag lunch and 
beverages Transportation is 
by bus, departing from and 
returning to the Museum. Use 
the coupon on page 5 to 
register, and please note that 
tickets are available only by 
mail. 




ISSN 0194-61 10 

Vol. 19, No. 9 
October 1994 

Donna Bell — Editor c^-c 

Sheila Greenberg - Manager of Membership Services 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Yolanda Loften — Fulfillment Coordinator 

Robert Jahn — Program Coordinator 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and Higher 
Members of the American Museum of Natural History is 
published monthly September through ^ b ™ on ™^e 
August. Publication offices are at Natural Htstory magazine. 
American Museum of Natural History. Centra Park West at 
79th Street. New York. NY 10024-5192. Telephone: (212) 
769-5606. Subscnptions: $50 a year for Participating 
Membership. $100 a year for Contributor Membership . 

.94 American Museum of Natural History. ^ con °;? a L r(;s s 
age paid at New York. NY. Postma ster: Please : sen I add 
changes to: Rotunda. Membership Office, American Museun 
,ry. Central Park West at 79th Street. New York. 
NY 10024-5192. 



Printed by Waldon Press. Inc., New York 







mbers' Tours 



mpires Beyond the Great Wall 

day, November 4 

L°; a^o^n^Pa^p^ and Hfche, Men.be. 



iold and silver plates and 
sels bronze weapons, silk 
ments, pottery, porcelain, 
\ funerary ware are among 
. treasures on display in the 
•rent Gallery 77 exhibition 
npires Beyond the Great 
all The Heritage of 
mghls Khan. 
Members can take guided 



5 of the exhibition, which 
features priceless artifacts that 
date from the second millen- 
nium BC up to the era of 
Genghis Khan and the Yuan 
dynasty of the thirteenth and 
fourteenth centuries. Volun- 
teer Highlights Tour guides 
will lead Members around the 
gallery and talk about the 



exhibits, which are from the 
collections of seven museums 
of China's Inner Mongolia 
Autonomous Region. 

Use the October Members 
programs coupon to register 

for the Members' tours. 

which are appropriate for 

participants ages 13 and 

older. 




rhc Cult of the Khan 

ruesday, November 22 

$? and open only to Participating and Higher Members 

\ppropriate for ages 16 and up 



Most of the rest of the 
world regards him as a savage 
conqueror whose ruthlessness 
was matched only by his 
greed. In his native Mongolia, 
however, Genghis Khan is 
revered as the founder of an 
empire that promoted the 
most extensive cultural and 
commercial interchanges 
between East and West up to 

that time. 

Historian Morris Kossabi 
will talk with Members about 



the life and career of Genghis 
Khan and his role in modern- 
day Mongolia, where a cult of 
Genghis fuels Mongolian 
nationalism. This program is 
presented in conjunction with 
the Gallery 77 exhibition 
Empires Beyond the Great 
Wall. The Heritage of 
Genghis Khan. 

A professor of history at 
the City University of New 
York and adjunct professor at 
Columbia University. Rossab. 



is the author of Khubi la i 
Khan. His Life and Times 
(University of California 
Press. 1988) His popular 
Members' program Genghis 
Khan Hero or Villain, which 
was presented last month, 
has led to his return engage- 
ment, and Members are ad- 
vised to register early 

Use the coupon on page b 
to register, and please note 
that tickets are available only 
by mail. 



A tiny nation surges 2,500 year* and prospers 

The Samaritans: 

People of the Sacred Mountain 

Thursday, November 17 

7:00 p.m. 

^ToXm^SlOfornon-Mernbers 



The rituals and lifestyles of 
a Middle Eastern population 
that separated from the Jew- 
ish mainstream more than 
2.500 years ago are the focus 
of the documentary The 
Samaritans. People of the 
Sacred Mountain. Filmmaker 
Johanna Spector will intro- 
duce the documentary by 
discussing the history and 
culture of this little-known 
people and the extensive 
research undertaken in the 
film's production. 

Considering themselves 
ancient Hebrews rather than 
Jews, the Samaritans denve 
their customs and ceremonies 
from the Samaritan Penta 
teuch. which differs slightly 
from the Hebrew Five Books 
of Moses. Their observances 
are not influenced by Judaic 
interpretations based on rab- 
binical writings and offer a 
fascinating contrast to those 
of modem Judaism, since the 
Samaritans observe the Sab- 
bath. High Holidays, and 
festivals (Pesach. Shavuot. 
succot) much as they were 
observed 2.000 years ago. 
The film is a remarkable 
ethnographic record of a 




^ st dancng dunng festival on Mt. Gerizim 



little-known people who once 
numbered in the hundreds of 

thousands and lived through- 
out the Levant and Egypt 
Today they still dwell In two 
enclaves - in Holon.srae. 

and in Nablus. on the West 
Bank of the Jordan. At the 

turn of the century their 
population was 135. in 
1968-70. at the time ot 
filming, there were fewer 
than 450 individuals, and 

today. 550 

Johanna Spector who » a 

music ethnologist, has studied 
the Samaritans for several 



Daytime telephone: 

Membership category:- 
Total amount enclosed: 



decades and sound-recorded 
their entire liturgy and musii 
Her collection is housed at 
the Hebrew University s 
Fonoteka in Jerusalem bne 
will answer questions from 
the audience after screening 
the 30-minute film. 

This program is two hours 
long and will be the first in a 
senes of Specters ethno- 
graphic films. Other docu- 
mentaries, which will be 
shown in 1995. will profile 
Jews of India and Yemen. 

Use the October Members 
programs coupon to register 



Please make check (if applicable) payable to the .Amcric.,.. j 
M lG u" e um of Natural Historv and ma « ; 

I accepted. No refunds or exchanges. 

i 

! Unless otherwise indicated, no ^r^han^ht 

', are entitled to one ticket. 

! Okavango. Thursday. October 6 ,7:00 p.m. J 

! Number of Members tickets at |10:___ 

' Number of additional ticket i — 

j Total amount enclosed for program: — . 

1 Jennie. Tuesday. October 11 7:00 p.m \ 

Number of Members tickets a |5:__ 

Number of additional tickets at 3>8: — , 

Total amount enclosed for program. __ 

Ghost Stories. Friday, October 28. 
For children 

Number of Members tickets at |b:__ 
! Number of additional tickets at 3>8: — 
; Total amount enclosed for program: — 
1 For adults t 

1 Number of Members tickets a $»:__ 
1 Number of additional tickets at M* — 
1 Total amount enclosed for program: __ 

\ third choice of times. 
| 6:00 p.m __6:30pm. 
J— 7 00 pm __7:30 Pi m. 

! Number of free Members tickets 
(No more than 2. please): — 

lffflttJB$Wi S£- 

11:00 a.m 1:00 p.m. 3:00 p.m. 

j Number of Members' tickets a |7:_ 

! Number of additional tickets at *1U 

Total amount enclosed for program:__ 

Eyes of the World. Wednesday November 9, 7:00 p m 
Number of Members" tickets at |7^_ 
Number of additional tickets a! &1U- — 

| Total amount enclosed for progranv__ 

! The Samaritans: People of the Sacred Mountain 

! Thursday. November 17 7 OOP m 

', Number of Members Jcketsat|7: 
J Number of additional tickets at $10-.___ 
J Total amount enclosed for program:_ 

I Female Genital Mutilation. Wednesday. November 30. 

'. 7 00 p.m. * 7 

I Number of Members tickets a $7:_ 

! Number of addit, I tu-kets at $1U 

' Total amount enclosed for prog- 









11 



NOTE: Orders ,e« jved ^^^ 
show dates will be held lor picK up j|ab|e „ 

D " |Tone and your check will be re.umed. 



Fall 1994 Lecture Series 



lnaddiiM-M to the following 
programs, the Department of 
Education's Fall L994Ucture 

Series features a four-part 
program on earthquakes, a 
guided tour of the Gallery 77 
exhibition Empires Beyond 
the Great Wall, and two 
I,-, lures based on the Royal 
Tombs of Sipan exhibition. 
For details about these and 
other programs, call (212) 
7695310 

A History of 
Gospel Music: 
I've Got a 
Feelin' 

Two Thursdays, 
Nov. 3 and 10 

This two-part lecture/dem- 
onstration, which focuses on 
a joyous African American 
tradition, is hosted by L 1 1 
Frazier. A gospel singer, 
pianist, and composer, 
Frazier will have listeners 
singing, laughing, swaying. 
and .i.ipping to familiar n"" 
tuals. jubilee songs, and 
gospel music. 

Frazier's historical/bio 
graphical presentation will 



describe the spirit of the black 
gospel church and its outra- 
geous and spellbinding 
singe,, II. 11 also discuss his 
personal experiences of 
gospel music around the 
world and augment the pre- 
sentation with audiotapes and 
vocal demonstrations 

The program will take 
place from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m. 
Tickets are $18 for Members 
and $20 for non-Members. 

Theodore 
Roosevelt in 
Africa: His 
Famous 
Collecting and 
Hunting Safari 
of 1909-10 

Thursday, Nov. 3 

Amateur entomologist 
Tweed Roosevelt will discuss 
his greatgrandfather's cele- 
brated 10-month hunting and 
collecting expedition in 
Africa. Upon leaving the 
White House at the age of 
50. Theodore Roosevelt 
mounted the biggest African 



safari ever: with as many as 
500 bearers, the journey 
began at Mombassa and 
ended on the Nile in Egypt. 
More than 13.000 specimens 
were collected, some of 
which can be seen at the 
Museum. The collection, 
especially of large mammals, 
was the largest that has ever 
been brought out of Afnca by 
a single party. 

The program will take 
place from 7:00 to 8:30 p m. 
1 1, kets are $1350 for 
Members and $15 for non- 
Members 

Museum 

Mystery 
Theater: The 

Mask of 
Suspicion 

Monday, Nov. 7 

An ancient ceremonial 
mask that endows the wearer 
with special powers was dis- 
covered by an anthropologist, 
who brought it back to the 
Museum for exhibition. After 
Us display several employees 
and visitors had strange acci- 
dents in the gallery and 



sighted specters of historic 
individuals associated with he 
Museum Important and valu- 
able ceremonial objects were 
missing or inexplicably 
moved. Could the mask be 
responsible? 

The Education Department 
and Manhattan Rep Com- 
pany present an intriguing 
fiction that explores the cul- 
ture of the Northwest Coast 
Indians. A lecture on the on- 
qins of the masks of the fic- 
tional Bella Mon Indians will 
offer clues to the mystery s 
solution. Participants w.ll help 
solve the puzzle and attend a 
wine-and-cheese reception. 

The program will take 
place from 7:00 to 8.30 p.m. 

Tickets are $22.50 for Mem- 
bers. $25 for non-Members. 

On the 
Evolution of 

the 

Imagination 

Four Tuesdays, 
Nov. 15- Dec. 6 

In celebration of its twenty- 
fifth anniversary, the Touch- 
stone Center of New York 



1994 Margaret Mead Film and Video Festival 



li , The Spirit of TV (Mon- 
day, October 17. at 8:00 
p.m.) the Wal&pl Indians 
the value of video and 
ision as a tool to pre 
serve their tradition! Rrsl 
Moon, from the Richard Gor- 
don and Carma Hinton Rel 
rospective. looks at the 
celebration of Chinese New 
Year (Th October 13. 

,,, ,, io p.m I Both Films 
among Ihlsyeai s featun 
the Margaret Mead Film and 

al. Foracom- 
plct, s, h.-dule of films, call 
(212)769-5305. 

Th, 'I will take place 

from Wednesday. October 
12. through Tuesday, Octo- 
ber 18. The films will b> 
shown from 6:30 to 10:30 
p.m. on weekdays except for 
Friday, when they'll be shown 
from 6-00 to 8:30 p.m 
Screenings are from 1 1 00 
am. to 8.30 p.m. on Saiu. 

day and from L1 00 am to 
5:30 p.m. on Sunday 

Dailv tickets, which go 
on sale after 5.00 p.m on 
weekdays and 10:30 a.m. 
on weekends, are $7 foi 
Members and students with 
ID and $8 for non-Members. 
A festival pass (valid October 
12-18) is $40 for Members 

and students with ID and $44 
for non-Members. Call (2 
769-5305 for information 
about pre-purchasing tickets 
with a credit card and for 
details about the bene! Its 
associated with becoming a 
Friend of the Festival. 



City presents a series of lec- 
tures: On the Evolution of 
the Imagination Thoughts, 
Musings, and Possibilities. 
Three of the lectures will fea- 
ture two speakers each and a 
short question-and-answer 
period. The fourth evening is 
an informal gathering for 
audience members who wish 
to share their own thoughts 
and ideas about the series. 

Nov. 15: The Meaning of 
Objects. Anthropologist Ian 
Tattersall and Alexander Mar 
shack, a research fellow at 
the Peabody Museum of Ar 
chaeology and Ethnology. 
Nov. 22. The Origin of 
Metaphor. Poet Elizabeth 
Sewell and Paul Shepard, 
Avery professor of Human 
Ecology at Pitzer College. 

Nov. 29: The Awareness 
of the Spiritual. Scholar 
Roger Lipsey and Hasel 
Dean-John. Seneca storyteller 
and linguist. 

Dec 6: An Evening of 
Thoughts. Moderator Richard 
Lewis is the founder and di- 
rector of the Touchstone 
Center in New York City. 

All programs will take place 
between 7:00 and 8:30 p.m 
Tickets for the series are $27 
for Members and $30 for 
non-Members. 




Voices in 

Movement 



Saturday, 
November 19 
2:00 and 4:00 p.m. 
Kauhnann Theater 
Free 



The modem dance troupe 
Voices in Movement will per- 
form selections from several 
different satirical works, in- 
cluding "A Tale and Two 
Chairs" and "Memory 
Gland." Featured performer 
Laura Staton possesses a 
unique style that combines 
theatrics, physicality, and a 
Chaplinesque sense of 
humor Like silent film, mod- 
em dance is a visually expres- 
sive art form that consists of 
distinctive elements such as 
space, time, rhythm, and 
gesture. This performance 
promises to heighten the 
audience's awareness of 
movement and other facets 
of nonverbal communication 
The Voices in Movement 
program will be signed as wen 
as spoken and is suitable for 
family audiences. No tickets 
and no reservations are nec- 
essary for this free program, 
but seating is limited and on a 
first-come, first-served basis. 
For additional information can 
(212) 769-5186 



Jennie 

Tuesday, October 11 



Ethical questions about the 
use of primates for research 
and the attempts to raise 
chimps among humans are 
the focus of the Members 
program Jennie. Author 
Douglas Preston will explore 
the blurry line that divides 
humans and animals and 
discuss how remarkably close 
our qualities of humanity are 
to those of our nearest animal 
relatives. 

As a columnist for Natural 
History magazine, Preston 
explored the Museum's 
archives and described his 
findings in Dinosaurs in the 
Attic. His latest book, Jen- 
nie, was inspired by one of 
the true stories from the Mu- 
seum's past — the tragic tale 
of Meshie, a chimpanzee 
raised by a curator along with 
his own children. 

Preston will show actual 
footage of Meshie from the 
Museum's archives. He'll 
recount fascinating case histo- 
ries of other chimpanzees 
raised in captivity and discuss 
the ethical and scientific is- 
sues surrounding these ef- 
forts. Copies of his novel, 
which is published by St. 
Martin's Press, will be avail- 
able for purchase at the pro- 
gram. 

The program will take 
place at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Kaufmann Theater. Tickets 
are $5 for Members and $8 
for non-Members. Use the 
October Members' programs 
coupon on page 3 to register. 



Members' Walking 
Tour of 

Ladies Mile 

Friday, October 14 



Members' Day Trip to 

Hawk 
Mountain 



Saturday, October 15 

Bring the binoculars and 
board the bus for an autumn 
day of birdwatching At Penn- 
sylvania's Hawk Mountain 
Sanctuary Members will see 
hawks, ospreys, eagles, and 
other migrating raptors as 
they head south from their 
breeding grounds in Canada. 

Naturalist Stephen C. 
Quinn, a Museum authority 
on birds, will accompany 
Members on the tnp Partici- 
pants should bring a bag 
lunch and be sure to wear 
proper clothing and footwear. 
The trip, which is appropri- 
ate for participants ages 16 
and older, will take place 
from 7:00 am. to 7:00 p.m. 
Use the coupon below to 
order tickets, which are $60 
and available only to Partici- 
pating and Higher Members. 
Please note that tickets are 
available only by mail. 

Sex, Love, 
and Religion 
in South 
India 

Friday, October 21 



One of the city's fastest- 
changing landmark districts, 
Ladies Mile is the district of 
great stores and little shops 
where Jim Brady bought his 
diamonds, the Vanderbilts 
chose their carpets, and 
Lillian Russell ordered her 
wide-brimmed hats. The 
magnificent old buildings that 
housed turn-of-the-century 
emporiums are being revived 
as the superstores of the 
1990s 

Joyce Gold, a Manhattan 
historian and teacher, will 
lead the Members' walking 
tour of Ladies' Mile. In addi- 
tion to surveying the area s 
historical buildings, the tour 
will visit one of the chief 
costumers of the Broadway 
theater. Members can get a 
rare glimpse at the painstak- 
ing craftwork that goes into 
the creation of the stage's 
vibrant costumes. 

The tour will take place 
between 10.30 a.m. and 
1 30p.m Tickets are $25 
and available only by mail to 
Participating and Higher 
Members. The tour is appro- 
priate for participants ages 
18 and older. Use the coupon 
at right to register 



All of the world's religions 
have rules about love and 
sexual behavior, and often the 
love of God and the lower 
sexual impulses are opposed. 
Anthropologist Chantal 
Boulanger will discuss how 
Hinduism developed a 
method of integrating sex and 
God in a philosophy that 
accepts all loving behavior. 
Practices considered de- 
viant in other religions are 
accepted in the faith of South 
India, which allows the love of 
God to be interpreted in a 
physical manner. Boulanger 
will describe how the reli- 
gion's myths address every 
form of sexual behavior, and 
she'll talk about the evolution 
of religious attitudes in the 

region. , 

The program, which is tree 
and open to all Museum visi- 
tors, will take place at 6:30 
p.m. in the Linder Theater. 
No tickets or reservations are 
necessary but seating is lim- 
ited and available on a first- 
come, first-served basis 



nator of environmental public 
programs at the Museum, will 
point out aspects of geologi- 
cal interest. William Schuster, 
forester and director of the 
Black Rock Forest Preserve. 
will talk about local plant life 
and the relationship of Black 
Rock to the rest of the Hud- 
son Highlands. 

The cruise, which is appro- 
priate for ages 13 and older, 
will take place from noon to 
400 p.m. Tickets are $50 
for Members and $60 for 
non-Members. Use the 
coupon on this page to regis- 
ter, and please note that tick- 
ets are available only by mail. 



Ghost Stories 

Friday, October 28 

It's the lucky thirteenth 
anniversary of storyteller 
Laura Simms' annual Hal- 
loween shows at the Museum, 
and this year promises to be 
as deliciously spooky as ever. 
Simms dynamic perform- 
ances of ghost and spirit tales 
from the visible and invisible 
worlds will feature her original 
retellings of traditional stories 
as well as some haunting true- 
life adventures. 

A 6.00 p.m. show, which 
is geared toward children 
between the ages of 5 and 
12. will be full of chills and 
giggles Tickets are $5 for 
Members and $8 for non- 
Members. The adults' pro- 
gram, in which listeners will 
journey to strange and fantas- 
tic lands, will begin at 8.00 
p.m. Tickets are $8 for Mem- 
bers and $12 for non- Mem- 
bers. Both shows will take 
place in the Kaufmann 
Theater. Use the coupon on 
page 3 to register 



Hudson 
Valley Cruise 

Sunday, October 23 

A high-speed catamaran 
will carry Members through 
the historic Hudson Valley at 
the peak of the season s 
changing colors. Participants 
will sail the length of the Pal- 
.sades and follow the river 
through its most spectacular 
scenery to West Point and 
Storm King Mountain and 

back ,, 

Sidney Horenstem. coordi- 



At the Naturemax Theater 

Africa: The Serengeti 
and Yellowstone 




Members' 
Mask-Making 
Workshop for Adults 

You're Never 
Too Old for 
Tricks or 
Treats 

Sunday, October 30 

The children have fun with 
the crafts projects, June 
Myles observed, but their 
grown-up companions seem 
to have an even better time. 
June figured that the kids 
could spare the adults long 
enough for a workshop that 
will help make Halloween 
more fun for everyone. 

Members can make the 
mask of their dreams (or 
nightmares) at You're Never 
Too Old for Tricks or 
Treats. Participants don t 
have to be especially crafty or 
skilled; they'll use everyday 
items rather than high-tech, 
theatrical materials to create 
marvelous masks. 

The workshop will take 
place from 1:30 to 3 00pm 
Tickets are $18 and available 
only by mail to Participating 
and Higher Members ages 16 
and older. Use the coupon at 
right to register. 



"There is a place on earth 
where it is still the morning of 
life and the great herds still 
run free. - ' These words, deliv- 
ered in the resonant baritone 
of James Earl Jones, begin 
and end Africa. The 
Serengeti. the story of the 
greatest migration of land 
animals anywhere on the 
planet The IMAX film takes 
viewers on a journey In the 
company of more than 1.5 
million animals as they travel 
over 500 miles across one of 
the most important animal 
sanctuaries on earth 

A thunderous chorus of 
hooves and the spectacle of 
wildebeests as far as the eye 
can see introduce viewers to a 
sight that few humans have 
beheld: the great migration. 
Accompanied by countless 
zebras and gazelles, the wilde- 
beests endure drought, starva- 
tion, and the pursuit of lions, 
cheetahs, and crocodiles to 
return to their ancient calving 
grounds. Showtimes fi il 
Africa. The Serengeti are 



LO iOand 11:30 a.m 1:30 

and 3:30 p.m. dally 

Yellowston i>lo- 

ration of Americas oldest and 
largest national | 
an unusual look at the pai I 
history, geology, and wildlife 
Viewers explore Old Faithful 
and many of the park's v. il 
canic wonders, and they U 
observe its wildlife which 
includes one of the few sur 
viving populations of bison as 
well as elk, bears, moose, and 
beavers Yellowstone is 
shown at 12.30. 2 30. and 

4:30 pin 

On Friday and Saturday at 
6:00 and 7:30 p.m., Africa: 
The Serengeti is shown on a 
double bill with Yellowstone. 
Admission to Naturemax for 
Participating and Higher 
Members Is $4.75 for adults 
and $2.25 for children P 
for the double feature are $6 
for adults and $3.25 foi chll 
dren. Schedules and prii 
are subject to change without 
notice. Call (212) 769-5650 
for further information. 



Tours, Day Trips, and Workshops. I this coupon 
to "gister for the walking tour Ladles 1 Mile; the Hudson 
Valley Cruise, the day trips to Montm.k I'nmt ..ml 
Hawk Mountain, and the workshops Mask Making for 
Adults and The Cult of the Khan. 



Name(s) of program(s): 



Number of tickets and price (please indicate which pro 
gram if more than one): 



Total amount enclosed:. 



Name:. 



Address: 
City: — 



.State: 



J?ip 



Daytime telephone: 

Membership category: 

Please make check payable to the American Museum of 
Natural H.story and mail with a «";•**;«"«*• 
stamped envelope to Tours and Day / nps 
Membership Office American Museum of Natural 
H,st^ Central Park West at 79th Street. New York. NY 
10024-5192. 






Young Members' Birthday Parties 
at the Museum 

Celebrate Your Birthday with Relatives and Friends 



Etotherium, a prehistoric party animal 



We'll provide the relatives 
— extinct ones, that is. Many 
of these kinfolks will be 
strangers, and others will just 

trange, and you'll do a 
little climbing through their 
family trees At the new Lila 
Acheson Wallace Wing of 
Mammals and Their Extinct 
Relatives, you'll get acquainted 
with some prehistoric beasts 
like mammoths in.isiodons, 
and saber-toothed cats and 
discover which of these crea- 
tures are gone forever and 
Ich have modem cousins. 



You bring the friends (and 
the cake), and we'll play 
games, make a mammalian 
family memento, and party 
away for two hours. It will be 
a birthday that won't fade 
into oblivion! 

The Membership Office 
sponsors other theme parties 
for Members between the 
ages of 5 and 10 that focus 
on dinosaurs, African mam- 
mals, reptiles and amphib- 
ians, ocean dwellers, and 
Native Americans. 
The group should be no 



fewer than 10 and no more 
than 20. The fee is $275 plus 
$15 per child and covers all 
materials and the services of a 
Museum party coordinator. 
The coordinator will help you 
plan a party that suits your 
child's tastes and will handle 
everything from candles to 
party favors. All you need to 
do is bring the cake and help 
escort the guests. 

For more information 
about the birthday parties, 
call the Membership Office at 
(212)769-5542. 



The First 125 Years 

Exhibitions open in Birds of the World and 
the Akeley Gallery on Friday, October 14 



A special exhibition of 
photographs, specimens, and 
irabllia will go on display 
mon th In the I (all of Birds 
of the World in commemora- 
tion of the Mus. inn s I : ,r >th 
anniversary The I Irsl 125 

s will offer a decade-by- 
decade survey of the 

sum's growth and devel- 
i ipmenl into a i ultural mecca 
for both New Yorkers and 
tourists and a world-renowned 
iter for scientific research 
Examples from the earliest 
colic flons acquired in the 
1860s and 1870s willbeon 
display along with items un 
earthed dunng the Muse 
insi paleontological and 
archeological expediti- ins u i 
the 1890s The exhibition 
traces the Museum s expan- 
m and focuses on some of 
its highlights. Including earrj 
examples of mounted fa 

s and mammals, arti- 
facts from Margaret Mead S 
South I ^editions in 

the 1920s and 1930s, and 



Sacred Cities 

of Southeast Asia 




Olsen, Andrews, and the dinosaur eggs in 1925 



objects from the dramatic 
1950s Men of the Mon- 
tana exhibit, which was 

originally scheduled for a 
three-month run but proved 
so popular thai it u-mained 
for 22 y< 

The exhibition chronu I - 
Museum-sponsored expedi- 
tions ovei ili« past centui- 
from the tum-of-the-century 
• peditions to the 



Northwest Coast and Siberia 
to the current discoveries of 
fossil animals in Mongolia, 
where the Andrews Expedi- 
tions of the 1920s uncovered 
the first known dinosaur eggs. 
Photographs will be on 
•lay in the Akeley Gallery 
exhibition People and 
Places which will i> <->ture 
images taken by Museum 
personnel during expeditions. 



From January 9 to Febru- 
ary 1, the American Museum 
will sponsor an exciting jour- 
ney to Indonesia. Vietnam, 
and Cambodia. Each of these 
countries features a combina- 
tion of ancient cultures and 
stunning landscapes. 

This cruise itinerary in- 
cludes the islands of Bali and 
Borneo as well as Saigon, 
Hanoi, the lovely old imperial 
capital of Hue, and Phnom 
Penh, which retains its charm 
and beauty despite years of 
turmoil. Participants will ex- 
plore complex monuments 
in the magnificent Khmer 
cities of Angkor, the temples 
of Borobudur, the Besakih 
Temple on Bali, the Marble 
Mountains above Da Nang in 
Vietnam, and many other 
ancient sites. 



An integral part of this and 
every Discovery Cruise/Tour 
is a comprehensive and stim- 
ulating educational program 
consisting of illustrated lec- 
tures and informal discussions 
by a team of distinguished 
scientists and researchers. 
American Museum lecturers 
on board for this exploration 
of Southeast Asia include an 
anthropologist who special- 
izes in the cultural traditions 
of East Asia and a paleontolo- 
gist who conducts research 
on hominoids at the Institute 
of Archaeology in Hanoi. 
The price ranges from 
$7,495 to $8,645, per per- 
son, double occupancy For 
more information, call Dis- 
covery Cruises/Tours at (8001 
462-8687 or in New York 
State at (212) 769-5700. 





Expedition Calendar 



This 1995 calendar com- 
memorates the 125th an- 
niversary of the American 
Museum. Images and anec- 
dotes from spectacular expe- 
ditions — from the Gobi 
Desert to the North Pole, the 
Congo to the South Pacific — 
are featured, along with color- 
ful and exotic artifacts, origi- 



nal drawings, and rare pho- 
tographs. A special pull-out 
time line highlights the Mu- 
seum's history. 

The calendar measures 
M \ 10W and costs 
$10.95 each, plus $2 ship- 
ping and handling per cal 
dar. Use the coupon below to 
order. 






Expedition Calendar 



Name: 



Address: . 
City: 



.State:. 



.Zip:- 



Daytime telephone: 



Total amount enclosed (include sales tax. if applicable): 

Please make your check payable to the American Museum 
Natural History and mail with coupon to: AMNH Expedi" on 
Calendar. Central Park West at 79th Street. New York. 
NY 10024-5192 



Museum Notes 



Hours 

Exhibition Halls 

Mon.-Thurs. & Sun 10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

Fri. & Sat 10:00 a.m.-8:45 p m 

The Museum Shop 

Mon.-Thurs. & Sun 10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

Fri. & Sat 10:00 a.m.-7.45 p.m. 

The Junior Shop 

Mon.-Fri 10:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun ...10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

The Museum Library 

Tues.-Fn 11:00 a.m.-4-.OO p.m. 

The Natural Science Center 

For children of all ages and their families. 
Closed on Mondays and holidays. 

Tues-Fri ..2:00-4:30 p.m. 

Sat & Sun 1:00-4:30 p.m. 

Museum Dining 

Diner Saurus Fast Service Eatery 
Daily 11:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m. 

Garden Cafe 

Reservations: (212) 769-5865 

Lunch: Mon.-Fn 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. 

Dinner. Fri. & Sat 5:00-7:30 p.m. 

Brunch. Sat. & Sun 11:00 a.m.^:00 p.m. 

Whale's Lair 
Fri 3:00-8:00 p.m. 

S at . Noon-8:00 p.m. 

Sun. & most holidays Noon-5:00 p.m. 

Snack Carts (at 77th Street & on the first floor of 
the Roosevelt Memorial Hall) 

Sat. & Sun 11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

Entrances 

During Museum hours uisirors can enter the 
building through the 77th Street entrance, the 
narking lot entrance (81st Street), or the Roo- 
sevelt Memorial Hall entrance (79th Street and 
Central Park West). Visitors attending pro- 
grams after hours can enter the building 
through the driveway entrance at 79th 
Street and Central Park West. 

Museum Tours 

Free Museum Highlights Tours are available to 
individuals and families. Tours are conducted 
daily at 10.15 and 11.15 am.. 1:15, 2 15. and 
315 p.m. and depart from the second floor be- 
tween the Roosevelt Rotunda and the Hall of 
African Mammals 

Group Tours are available for a fee. All Group 
Tours must be scheduled through the Volunteer 
Office. For details, call (212) 769-5566. 



Parking News 

The Museum is attempting to improve use of its 
limited parking lot Beginning October 1 the 
Museums parking lot will offer expanded hours and 
revised rates. The parking lot, which is operated in 
conjunction with the Edison Hayden CoT V° T * h ™- 
will be open every day from 7:00 a.m. till ll:dO 

Rates for cars entering between 7:00 a.m. and 
5:00 p.m. start at $5 for up to a half-hour and 
advance by stages to a closing-time max,m V m 1 °* 
$17 Cars entering between 5:00 p.m. and llwSU 
p.m. will be charged a minimum of $5 and a 
maximum of $7 on Monday through Thursday and a 
maximum of $12 on Friday. Saturday, and Sunday 

Busses will be charged $1 1 and will not be 
admitted on weekends. 

The park.ng lot has a capacity of 100 vehicles 
and is operated on a first-come, first-served basis 
Hertz Manhattan, located one block away from 
the Museum at 2 1 West 77th Street (between 
Broadway and Amsterdam), offers parking discounts 
to Members; on Monday through Fnday. Members 
receive a $2 discount off regular prices and on 
Saturday and Sunday they receive a $3 discounr 

Call the Membership Office at (212) 769-5606 
for information about alternative parking. 



Happenings at the Hayden 



Sky Shows 

Update: The Universe 

New discoveries from space are revealed on a 
daily basis, including information about black holes, 
new planets, and colliding galaxies. In this fast- 
paced, "news magazine" presentation, you'll get an 
astronomy update and look through the new win- 
dows that astronomers have opened with the latest 
technology. 

In the past three years space telescopes such as 
the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the Euro- 
pean ROSAT. and the recently overhauled Hubble 
Space Telescope have been exploring the universe 
from space. At the same time, giant earth-bound 
telescopes scan the heavens, searching for signs of 
intelligent life in our galaxy. Update: The Universe 
explores cutting-edge research from the quest for 
extraterrestrial life to studies that peel back time in 
search of the dawn of creation. 

Note: There will be no Sky Show until October 
3. due to theater renovations. Please call (212) 769- 
5100 to verify schedule. 
Showtimes 

Mon-Fri 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. 

Sat 1 1 00 a.m. (except for Oct. 8 and Nov 5). 
1 00. 2-.00. 3:00. 4:00. and 500 p.m. 

Sun 1:00, 2:00. 3:00. 4:00, and 500 p.m. 

Admission (Participating and Higher Members) 
Adults: $4 
Children (2-12): $2 
Call (212) 769-5100 for non-Members prices 
and additional information. Please note that pi 
and schedule are subject to change without prfi »i 
notice. 

Children's Shows 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers Children sing along with images of 
their favorite Sesame Street Muppets as they learn 
about rainbows, the phases of the moon, sunsets, 
and stars. Sat.. Oct. 8. at 10-30 and 1 1 :45 a.m.. 



and Sat.. Nov. 5. at 10 lOa.m Aclini^um t.n !\n 
Hi [pating and Hlghei Members is $4 for adults and 
$2 for children. Members can pun h.ise up to four 
tickets at the Member prl 

Shows usually sell out in advance; reservatli in 
mail only, are ary. Make youi che< k payable 

to the Hayden Planetarium (attn: Wonderful Sky 
Central Park West al SKI Street, New Y. irk NY 
10024-r>r':') indicate membership category and a 
In si and second choice of showtimes. Be sure to 
Include a self-addressed stamped envelope and your 
daytime telephone number for additional 
information call (212) 769-5900. 

Rob< its In Space features Lucasfilm s R2D2 and 
C-3PO-* and has been created especially for chll 
dren ages 7 to 12. Together with a live host, these 
famous space robots take <hil.lt. -H "no torn «>l th. 
universe See how sal. illltes .md probes - the real 
space robots — help us learn aboul w irlds neai and 
far Journey from the earth to other planets and 
distanl black holes Sat., Nov 5, -it 11:45 a m 
Admission for Participating and Higher Members is 
$4 for adults and $2 for children. For additional 
information, call (212) 769 5900. 



Laser Shows 

Journey into another dimension where laser visu- 
als and rock music combine to create a dazzling I I j 
experience of slghl and sound Shows are presented 
on Fridays and Saturdays at 7:00. 8:30, and 10:00 
p.m. For prices and show ■>< liedul.-, i.-lephon.- 
(212)7695100. 

It's always a good idea to call before visit- 
ing the Planetarium, since prices, programs, 
and showtimes are subject to change without 
notice. For general Planetarium information, 
call (212) 769-5100. 



Celebrate 



The Royal Tombs 
of Sipan 

With Peruvian Specialities at 
ih«- Garden Cafe 

lunch, Mon.-Fri: 11:30-3:30 



Weekend Brunch, s <" Sun 11 I 
Dinner, Fri s -" • : •'" 

K, tei > """" 
i .,n th. Garden Cafe al 212 <W M i 

I I Oil ill. I OWI ' l ' el 




Eco Impact 
Forum 



On Thursday. October 27. 
:.i |ei turer David 

Berg presents Protecting and 
Managing New Yorl 
Natural Areas. Berg Is pri si 
den New York City 

Audubon Son 

This free pi 
anongoi 

that focus on environmeni.il 
: concern to the 

great ipolitan area. No 

tickets or reservations are 
necessary for the one-hour 

ill take place 
in the I wider Theater. For 
additional lnf< 



i 



3. 

3 
p+ 
ft 

a 
o 

3 
ft 

ft* 

a 

•o 




to 

e 
s 



I 



s 

A 






$ 



s. 



30 ^ 

= o 
°3 



(/) 



n 



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•M 




For Participating and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



Vol. 19. No. 10 Novoulvi l""l 







A tiny nation survives 2,500 years and prospers 

The Samaritans: 

People of the Sacred Mountain 

Thursday, November 17 

7:00 p.m. 

Main Auditorium 

$7 for Members, $10 for non-Members 



High Priest Amram and his brother. Priest Zedaqa, adviser to 
King Hussein of Jordan on Samaritan matters 



The rituals and lifestyles of a Middle 
Eastern population that separated 
from the Jewish mainstream more 
than 2,500 years ago are the focus of 
the documentary The Soman i 
People of the Sacred Mountain 
Filmmaker Johanna Spector will intro- 
duce the documentary by discussing 
the history and culture of this little- 
known people and the extensive re- 
search undertaken in the filn 
production. 

Considering themselves ancient 
Hebrews rather than Jews, the 



Samaritans derive their customs and 
ceremonies from the Samaritan Pen- 
tateuch, which differs slightly from the 
Hebrew Five Books of Moses Their 
observances are not influenced by 
Judaic interpretations based on rab- 
binical writings and offer a fascinating 
contrast to those of modem Judai 
since the Samantans observe the Sab- 
bath. High Holidays, and f« 
(Pesach. Shavuot. Succot) muii 
they were observed 2.000 years ago 

The film is a remarkable ethno- 
graphic record of a little I CO- 



pie who once numbered in the hun 
thousands .md lived throu 
out the Levant and Egypt Tod 
.till dwell in two enclaves In I lolon, 
Israel, and In Nablus, on th 

lordan. At the turn of the 
century their populati 
1968-71' filming, tl 

M.Hi 450 Indlwldu 
iy there are 550. 
Johanna Spector, wl 

iamari 
tans for several decades and sound- 
ordedthi liturgy and 



,,,<> i, i in i olta Bon Is housi 

i in 

,,i she will offei an In depth 
ml , he film that will lasl 

aboul 45 minutes, and aftei * reenlng 

the 31 him Spector will r>ii 

rom the audieni i 

hall an I 

program if thi to i in a series 
ofSpech .^rdocur 

i will be show i in L99 
will profile Jews of India and Yen 

i se the November Members' pro- 
grams coupon on page 3 to regi--; 










Stone dragon head, a Gallery 77 exhibit 



Members' Tours 

Empires 
Beyond 

the 

Great Wall 

Friday, November 4 

SOLD OUT from 
previous issue 



Members can take guided 
tours of the cuirent Gallery 
77 exhibition. Empires Be- 
yond the Great Wall The 
Heritage of Genghis Khan. 

Gold and silver plates and 
vessels, bronze weapons, silk 
garments, pottery, porcelain, 
and funerary ware are among 
the treasures on display in the 
exhibition. These priceless 
artifacts, none of which has 



ever been exhibited in the 
West, are from the collections 
of seven museums of China s 
Inner Mongolia Autonomous 

Region 

The tours, which are tree 
and open only to Participat- 
ing and Higher Members ages 
13 and older, will be led by 
Highlights Tour guides. Tour 
times are at 6:00, 6:30. 
7.00. and 7:30 p.m. 



Chemistry 
for Kids 

Saturday, November 5 



Young Members between 
the ages of 5 and 12 will 
observe some fabulous chemi- 
cal iransformationsinthe 
Kaufmann Theater, and then 



they'll conduct safe, easy-to- 
understand expenments of 
their own under adult supervi- 
sion. 

Patricia Redden returns to 
the Museum this month for 
the ninth annual presentation 
of Chemistry for Kids Pre- 
sented in conjunction with the 
American Chemical Society s 
observation of National 
Chemistry Week, it is espe- 
cially designed to excite 



young imaginations with the 

possibilities offered by the 

study of science 

Showtimes are 1 1 ;00 a.m. 

and 1 00 and 300 p.m. 

Tickets are $7 for Members 
and $10 for non-Members. 
Use the November Members 
programs coupon on page 3 
to register, and please note 
that all attendees, adults and 
children alike, must have 
tickets 



Members' Day Trip to 

Montauk 
Point 

Saturday, 
November 19 

Geologist Sidney Horen- 
stein will accompany Mem- 
bers to the very end of Long 
Island, wherrilav II M'.vey 
evidence of the topographic 
changes 1 1 1. .... a has under- 
gone in the 17.000 year, 
since the K. Age. Pail 1. 1 
pants witt walk on coastal 
sand dunes among steep, 
wave-cut bluffs that rise 30 to 

i above the beache- 
They'll take a look at Mon- 
i,„ik Lighthouse, which was 



built in the late eighteenth 
century, and stop at the Shin- 
necock Canal to see how it 
helps control the local coastal 

ecology. 

Horenstein. the Museum s 
coordinator of environmental 
public programs, will lead the 
tnp rain or shine. Wear shoes 
appropriate for walking on 
sandy and rocky beaches, and 
bring a bag lunch and bever- 
ages. Transportation is by 
bus. departing from and re- 
turning to the Museum 

The trip will take place 
from 7.30 am to 7:30 p.m. 

I icto its are $60 and available 
only to Participating and 
I lighter Members ages 16 and 
older Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register, and please 
note that tickets are available 
only by mail 



^- ,kk i 








Campaigning with the Khan 



The Cult of 
the Khan 

Tuesday, November 22 

Historian Morris Rossabi 
will talk with Members about 
the enigmatic character of 
Genghis Khan - the environ- 
ment from which he arose, 
the causes for his and the 
Mongols' sudden eruption 
from the steppelands. and the 
reasons for the swift and as- 
tonishing formation of the 
largest land empire in history. 



Rossabi will also discuss 
Khan's role in modern-day 
Mongolia, where a cult of 
Genghis fuels nationalism. 
This program, which is 
appropriate for ages 16 and 
older, is presented in conjunc- 
tion with the current Gallery 
77 exhibition Empires Be- 
yond the Great Wall: The 
Heritage of Genghis Khan It 
will take place from 7:00 to 
9:00 p.m. Tickets are $20 
and available only by mail to 
Participating and Higher 
Members. Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register 



Female 

Genital 
Mutilation 

Wednesday, 
November 30 

The practice of female 
genital mutilation (FGM) and 
its cultural significance are the 
focus of a program presented 
by physician Nahid Toubia. 
She'll describe the practice of 
FGM as a coming-of-age 
ritual and its cultural signifi- 
cance in relation to ideals of 
health and beauty, religion 



and morality, and male ap- 
proval and protection. 

Nahid Toubia, a women s 
health activist from Sudan, 
will discuss the complicate 
and effects of FGM. which is 

mainly performed on chil- 
dren, along with international 
efforts to stop the practice 
that attempt to change atti- 
tudes without threatening 
cultural integrity. 

The program will take place 
at 7 00 p.m. in the Main 
Auditorium. Tickets are $7 for 
Members and $10 for non- 
Members. Use the November 
Members' programs coupon 
on page 3 to register. 





ISSN 0194-6110 

Vol. 19. No. 10 
November 1994 

SheT^eenberg 1 - Manager of Membership Services 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Yolanda Loften — Fulfillment Coordinator 

Robert Jahn — Program Coordinator 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and 'Higher 
Members of the Amencan Museum of Natural History is 
published monthly September through ^*™"™^ 
August. Publication offices are at Natural His W™&£™ • 
American Museum of Natural History .Central Pa k West at 
Street New York. NY 10024-5192. Telephone (212) 769 
5606 Subscriptions: $50 a year for Participating Membership. 
$ 1 00 a year for Contributor Membership. 
© 1994 American Museum of Natural History. Second-class 
postage paid at New York. NY. Postma ster: r^a« «nd ^J q{ 
changes to Rotunda. Membership Office Amencan Museun 
Natural History. Central Park West at 79th Street, New YorK. 
NY 10024-5192 



Printed by Waldon Press. Inc.. New York 




Geology 



Thursdays, December 8 and 15 
7.00 p.m. t ^ 

$l5 f for J Memb^rs, r $20 for non-Members 




1934 drawing of the cold side of Mercury 



A new chapter in the sci- 
ence of planetology began on 
August 27. 1962, when the 
Mariner // space probe was 
launched to explore Venus. 
An enormous amount of 
information has been 
amassed since then and our 
knowledge of the solar system 
has been greatly expanded. 
Geologist Sidney Horenstein 
the Museum's coordinator of 
environmental public pro- 
grams, will present a two-part 



series of lectures that uses 
slides and videos to take 
Members on a tour of the 
planets and their salient geo- 
logical features. 

The lectures will start with 
the earth and moon, illustrat- 
ing some basic geological 
concepts and setting the stage 
(or the exploration of the rest 
of the solar system. Horen- 
stein will explain why the 
moon has no atmosphere or 
folded mountains and why 



Mars has huge shield volca- 
noes and an immense 
canyon. He'll take a look at 
Venus and its atmosphere, 
which creates a greenhouse 
effect, the cratered surface of 
Mercury, and the differences 
between the moons of 
Jupiter, including the origin 
of lo's sulfur lava flows 

Use the November Mem- 
bers' programs coupon on 
this page to register for the 
lectures. 



Eyes of the World 

Wednesday, November 9 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater M„ m Hor« 

$7 for Members, $10 for non-Members 



Members can see one of 
the world's rarest gemstones, 
the "Mona Lisa.' an 18.50- 
carat alexandrite cats-eye. 
The jewel was christened by 
the miner who discovered it, 
Henry F. Kennedy, who ob- 
served that its mesmerizing 
"eye'' follows the viewer. 

At the Members' program 
Eyes of the World Kennedy 
will display the phenomenal 
gem, which is bluish green 
under fluorescent lighting, 
green in sunlight, pink under 
incandescent light, and red 
in candlelight. Alexandrite's 



dramatic color changes are 
due to the trace element 
chromium, which causes the 
emerald to appear green and 
the ruby red. During the last 
three decades, the Brazilian 
interior has been honey- 
combed by as many as 
100,000 garimpeiros (pros- 
pectors) searching for this 
chromium-laced gem. 

First unearthed in 1830, 
alexandrite was found in the 
Ural Mountains and named in 
honor of Czar Alexander 11 

Alexandrite with a cat s-eye 
effect was unknown for many 




A ere. o/ garimpeiros ^^J^Jt^X 
covers a cache of gems. Hand <°°* a f|||s rock . 
used, and it took six weeks to remov 



years, and even today the 
jewel is so rare and expensive 
that most major museums 
don't have a specimen 

Kennedy will discuss how 
the jewel was found and fash- 
ioned, describing techniques 
and tricks used by cutters to 
illuminate the splendor within 
the rough gem. He'll exhibit 
the "Viana," voted Stone of 

the Year in 1988 by the 
cat s-eye cutters. Mined by 
Kennedy at Brazils Barro 
Preto. this flawless jewel 
sports a sharp, well-centered 
eye on a honey-colored body 
Members will also hear about 
the lives of garimpeiros and 
the cnt.cal issues they face. 
which include environmental 
destruction and climate 

change. 

A New Jersey native and 
self -described "professor by 
education." Kennedy survived 
a 1973 shipwreck off Tub a- 
rao (Shark City) on the south- 
ern Brazilian coast. He was 
captured by the beauty of the 
country and its people and 
has spent the past 20 years 
in Brazil, writing, consulting 
and lecturing In the fields of 
prospecting, mining, and 
marketing gemstones 

Use the November Mem- 
bers programs coupon on 
tins page to register 



November 
Members* 
Programs Coupon 



Name: 



• Address 



City: 



,State: 



-Zip:. 



Daytime telephone: 



• Membership category-. 



Total amount enclosed: 

Please make check (if applicable] payable to the An.enyn 
Museum of Natural History and mall with a ■eit 
add essed, stamped envelope to: KmMM 
Programs Membership Old-' American Museum "I 
NaturalHistory. Centraf Park West al MtSM! New 
York NY 10024 5192 Telephone reservations are not 
accepted. No refunds or exchanges. 

I Unless otherwise indicated, no more than eight 
'. tickets may be ordered for a program Partici- 
\ pating Members are entitled to four tickets per 

program at the Members' price "&« "ember* 
! are entitled to six tickets, and Associate Members 
! are entitled to one ticket. 



1 Chemistry for Kids Saturday, Nov 

' Please indicate a first and second choice of times 

_1 1:00 am _J OOp.m 3 00 p.m. 
'• Number of Members' tickets at $7^ — 
! Number of additional tickets at $10: — 
1 Total amount enclosed for program: — 
J Eyes of the World. Wednesday. November 9, 7.00 p m 
; Number of Membra I V- — 

' Number of ...kl.i.onal n< kets at $10: _ 
! Total amount enclosed for program: — 
! The Samaritans: People of the Sacred Mountain 
! Thursday. November 17, 700 pm. 
! Number of Members' tickets at J/:_ 

I I lUI I I^Lnlr »t S, 1 ( 1 



[Numoer oi ivitsmw »--- - z - 
Number of additional tick. 



INumoer oi duumuuu. U w»~ — ▼- — ■ 

; Total amount enclosed for program: — 
! Female Genital Mutilation. Wednesday. November 30, j 

! 7 00pm. . 

! Number of Member. n< kets al |7:_ 

! Number of addiii'»n,.l i h kets at *1U: — 

J Total amount enclosed for program: — 

'• Geology of the Planets. Thursdays. December 8 

land 15, 7:00 p.m. 

1 Number of Members Hcketsa -i ■ 

1 Number of additional tickets at WV. — 

| Total amount enclosed for program: 

'• Origami Holiday Workshops Sunday. December 11 

1 ££ Kate ,,„i level and a first, second, and third 

'■ choice of times. 

'. _ Young Children s Wor ksh< >p 

! " _ Beginners Workshop 

Intermediate Workshop 
' 10 30am __ ' ' 10a.m. 

2.00 pin 3:00 p.m. 

J Number of Members" tickets at $3: — 

', Total amount enclosed for program 

! Members" private viewing at the Naturemax Theater 

J Wednesday. D i 21 / <>() p m 

' Number of Members Hi t>b: — 

J Total amount ei « b ■■' < • '° r pr°9' r am : — 
1 Toyland Express feu da; Decembe 
1 Please indicate a first and second choice. 
L:00p.m. _3-.00p.m_ 

i Number of Membe. tsal J7 

• Number of additional tickets al $iu 

I i ,tal amount enclosed for program: — 






i NOTE Orders received less than ten days be«o« 

i SaL „d. „e he.d «° [ic P'^fX d va?. b,e. .. \ 

: £" phone and your check will be returned. 



Toyland Express 

Thursday, December 29 

1:00 and 3:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$7 for Members, $10 for non-Members 

Ages 4-8 




A trainload of enchanting 
from the past, present, 
and luture are headed this 
way aboard the Toyland 
Express At this performance 
by the Bob Brown Puppets 

ing Member* will 
whimsical marionettes stage 
an ever-changing musical 
revue. 



The production features a 
variety of musical styles, in- 
cluding a choo-choo that does 
the cha-cha to the pop song 
"Locomotion " Traditional 
toys — including a juggling 
teddy bear, a mechanical 
wind-up bird, a wooden 
soldier on horseback, and a 
jack-in-the-box — will per- 



form along with futuristic toys 
like a transformer robot and 
a space alien that's patterned 
after Buckminster Fuller's 
geodesic dome. 

Based in the Washington, 
DC. area since 1968. the 
Boh Brown Puppets are well 
known locally for their many 
appearances at the White 
House, the Kennedy Center, 
the National Theatre, Wolf 
Trap Farm Park, and hun- 
dreds of area schools and 
community centers. They 
have also established a 
national reputation through 
their performances at Lincoln 
Center, the Brooklyn Aca- 
demy of Music, and the De- 
troit Institute of Arts. Young 
people everywhere recognize 
Bob Brown's artistry from his 
many guest appearances on 
Mister Rogers' Neighbor- 
hood. Mulligan Stew, and 
The Wordshop 

Use the November Mem- 
bers' program coupon on 
page 3 to register 



Members' Adult-Child Workshops 

Wauja Sharing Rituals 

Saturday* December 3 

11:00 a.m.-noon (ages 4-8) 

1:30-3:00 p.m. (ages 9-12) 

$16 per couple for Members, $20 per couple for non-Members 







Everyone's a winnei at the 
Wauiu Sharing Rituals, a 
Men i nulv workshop at 

w/hii 1 1 kids play a trading 
game based on an Amazo- 
nian Indian tradition. 

The Wauja (pt • mounced 
WOW-sha) of Brazil dwell on 
a inhutary of the Amazon 
River. They're one of the 

Ion's several tribes whose 
languages belong to different 
families but whose customs 
are very much the same. The 
friendly relations among the 
bribes are strengthened by a 
trading system In which each 
tribe I inters for another's 
spe< laity — goods that in- 



clude bows, ornaments, bas- 
kets, and pottery 

At the workshops, partici- 
pants will sit in a circle to 
replicate the ritual by which 
people offer their surplus 
goods to their neighbors. 
Instead of an onerous system 
of taxation the Wauja have 
developed a system of redis- 
tributing wealth into a cele- 
bration of each other's 
generosity. The workshop 
participants will see how a 
material loss can be viewed 
as a psychological gain Each 
child will be given two each 
of a variety of items (mostly 
miniatures of Amazonun 



This drawing of a snake 

features some of the 

distinctive patterns 

Wauja often 

use in their art 



animals) — one to keep and 
one to barter As they trade 
and bargain for rubber 
lizards, parrots, and coat- 
imundis. the children experi- 
ence the fun of sharing. The 
program for older children 
will feature a slide show on 
the theme of a day in the life 
of a Wauja boy. 

The workshops will be 
presented by anthropologist 
Emilienne Ireland, who has 
resided for nearly two years 
among the Wauja. 

Use the coupon on page 5 
to register for the program, 
and please note that tickets 
are available only by mail 



Origami Holiday 
Workshops 

Sunday, December 1 1 

10:30 and 11:30 a.m., 2:00 and 3:00 p.m. 
$3 materials fee per person, and open only 
to Participating and Higher Members 




Families can experience the 
centuries-old charm and satis- 
faction of paperfolding at the 
sixteenth annual Origami 
Holiday Workshops, where 
they'll leam to make animals, 
stars, and other delightful 
figures. 

Young Children's Work- 
shop (ages 4-6). Youngsters 
will fold a few models from 
the following possibilities: 
butterflies, swans, jumping 
frogs, candy canes, purses, 
boxes, or sailboats. Children 
must be accompanied by an 
adult. 

Beginners' Workshop 
(ages 6 and older). Partici- 
pants will fold one or more of 
the following selections: a 
blow-up bunny, a panda, a 
whale, a butterfly, a frog pup- 



pet, a penguin, or a crystal. 
Intermediate Workshop 
(ages 7 and older). Partici- 
pants in this workshop should 
be comfortable with origami 
folds such as mountains and 
valleys, rabbit ears, inside- 
reverse, and squash folds. 
They'll leam at least one of 
the following models: a dove, 
a dinosaur, a star, a straw- 
berry, or a seal. 

All workshops are taught 
by Museum volunteers and 
members of Origami USA. Ai 
the conclusion of the work- 
shops. Members will receive 
origami paper and instruc- 
tions to take home- 
Use the coupon on page 3 
to register, and please note 
that tickets are available only 
by mail. 



Members' Adult-Child Workshop 

Make a Holiday 
Gingerbread House 

Saturday, December 17, 

and Sunday, December 18 

10:30 a.m.-noon and 1:30-3:00 p.m. 

$30 per couple, and open only to Participating 

and Higher Members 

Ages 5-10 



Make your dream house 
a reality at the Members' 
annual gingerbread-house- 
making workshop. You and 
your child will use jelly beans, 
candy canes, gumdrops, and 
other colorful candies to form 
the bricks, shingles, doors, 
and windows of gingerbread 
houses and apartments. 

June Myles will show par- 
Ik i pants how to stick-build 



the no-bake houses. Then 
parents and kids can let 
their imaginations run wild 
amid the sweets while they 
decorate their domiciles 

This family workshop is 
an annual tradition to which 
Members often return to build 
this year's model. Use the 
coupon on page 5 to reg 
and please note that tickets 
are available only by mail 



Members' Guided Tour 

at the Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Precolumbian Gold 

Tuesday, December 6 

1:00, 3:00, and 4:00 p.m. 

$18, and open only to Participating 

and Higher Members 

Ages 18 and up 



At around 1500 BC a 
young man in Andean South 
America was laid to rest with 
tiny bits of gold foil placed in 
his hands and mouth. This 
modest postmortem tribute is 
the earliest evidence of gold- 
working technology in the 
ancient Americas, and during 
the next 3.000 years the 
custom of interring gold ob- 
jects alongside the honored 
dead became an increasingly 
refined practice. 

Members can take a guided 
tour of the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art's Jan Mitchell 
Treasury for Precolumbian 
works of art in gold, which 
comprises items from all the 
goldworking areas of the 
ancient Americas. The 250 
works on display cover a wide 
range of periods, styles, and 
regions, and the collection 
traces the development of 
metalworking technology. 
The artifacts come from all 
the goldworking areas of the 
Americas, from Peru in the 



south — where the first gold 
is thought to have been 
worked — to Mexico in the 
north, the last region in the 
hemisphere to take up metal 
working in the Precolumbian 
era They range in date from 
the last centuries of the first 
millennium BC until the time 
of the Spanish conquest in 
the early sixteenth century. 

Exhibits include a dazzling 
display of personal ornaments 
for the head, face, and chest 
along with funerary offerings 
such as masks, effigy vessels, 
bowls, and ritual knives. The 
artifacts represent a variety of 
metalworking techniques, 
including hammering, alloy- 
ing, annealing, gilding, and 
casting. 

Before and after the 45- 
minute tours Members are 
free to explore the Museum 
until closing time at 5:15 
p.m Use the coupon below 
to register for the tours, and 
please note that tickets are 
available only by mail. 



Tours, Day Trips, and Workshops. Use this coupon 
to register for the guided tour Precolumbian Gold (indi- 
cate a first and second choice of times); the day trip to 
Montauk Point, and the workshops The Cult of the 
Khan. Make a Holiday Gingerbread House (please state 
which day and a first and second choice of times), and 
Wauja Sharing Rituals (be sure to indicate 1 1:00 a.m. 
for ages 4-8 or 1:30 p.m. for ages 9-12). 



Name(s) of program(s): 



Number of tickets and price (please indicate which pro- 
gram if more than one): 



Total amount enclosed:. 
Name: 



Address: 
City: 



.State: 



.Zip:. 



Daytime telephone:. 



Membership category: ■ 

Please make check payable to the American Museum of 
Natural History and mail with a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to: Tours and Workshops 
mbership Office, American Museum of Natural 
History. Central Park West at 79th Street. New York. NY 
10024-5192 



Members' Private Viewing at the Naturemax Theater 

Africa: The Serengeti and Yellowstone 



Wednesday, 

December 21 

7:00 p.m. 

$6, and open only to 

Participating 

and Higher Members 



Members night at the Na- 
turemax Theater — a double 
feature showing of Africa 
The Serengeti and Yell w 
stone — will take viewers on 
an IMAX safari across the 
plains of East Africa and in- 
side the world's most Inn 
geyser 

Every year more than a 
million wildebeests undertake 
the great migration across the 
Serengeti in search of water, 
greener pastures, and theli 
ani ienl i alving grounds. They 
travel from 500 to 800 miles 
in the course of this eight- 
moi ith odyssey. The great 
migration has been perfected 
and balanced over millennia 
dozens of species have 
adapted over time and de- 
pend on the migration as a 
crucial element of their thriv- 
ing, self-sustaining ecosystem. 

The wildebeests are | 
ceded by 200.000 zebras, 
which crop the coarse 
grasses, making them more 
palatable for wildebeests. The 
wildebeests are followed by 
half a million gazelles, whii h 
feed on the even more closely 
trimmed grass. Along the 
journey the migrating animals 
are stalked by numerous 
predators Lions, cheetahs 




Wildebeests travel the crocodile-infested Mara River 



wild dogs, hyenas, and other 
animals depend on the herbi 
vores for a const. ml lood 
supply. The predators help 
maintain a natural balance by 
culling the weaker or slower 
animals A/rici The 
Serengeti is 40 minutes li mg 
and narrated by James Earl 
Jones. 

Amni' a "Idest and 
largest national pa 
plored in Yellowstone, a 
spect.K ul.it j< lurney with high 
lights ranging from sunrise 
over the Grand Tetons to a 
river trip to the brink of the 
Grand Canyon's lower falls 
["he 2 2 million ai re na- 
tional park, which iva ten 
ated in 1872, covers an area 



largei than Rhode Island and 
Delav l!i.' 

earth s < rust, whit h Is ra u 
mall; 10 miles thick I 

only three to f< iiu mill i thli I 
in the Yellowstone an 
crack.'.l lion: stioti hing I hi 

i undergoes con itanl 
geological change, and the 
Rim examines the park s vi il 
i .ii in wonders, including 
nevei before seen footage ol 
their OldFaithful 

v. Ilowstoni alsi i lo< ik i al the 

, hlsti 'iv and il I 
bears, elk, and other wild 
di nlzeni I he film is 12 min 
utes long. 
Use the Novembej M< m 

programs coupon i >n 
page 3 to regi 



Members 9 Birthday Parties at the Museum 

Celebrate Your Birthday with Relatives and Friends 



We'll provide the relal 
— extinct ones, that is. Many 
of these kinfolks will be 
strangers, and others will just 
be -.t range, and you'll do a 
little climbing through their 
family trees. At the new Lila 
Acheson Wallace Wing of 
Mammals and Their Extinct 
Relatives, you'll get 
acquainted with some prehis- 
toric beasts like mammoths, 
mastodons, and saber-toothed 
cats and discover which of 
these creatures are gone for- 



ever and which have modem 

C I ItlSlllS 

bring the friends (and 
the cake), and we'll pi 
games, make a mammalian 
family memento, and party 
ty for two hours. 
The Membership Office 
sponsors other themi parties 
for M> i mI "i\ between the 
ages of 5 and 10 that focus 
on dinosaurs, African mam 
reptiles and amphib- 
ians, ocean dwellers, and 
Native Amerii 



The group should be no 

fi'Wi'i lli. in ID and ii 

than 20 rhe fee is $275 plus 

1 1 '. pei ( inld and i overs .ill 
materials and th< of a 

Museum party coordinator. 

( oordinator will help you 
pLiii .i p.uiv thai mil your 
( hild tastes and will handle 

thing from candl< 
part; All you need to 

do is bring the cake and help 
rt thegui l 

For more information, call 
(212)769 5542. 



Voices in Movement 



Saturday, November 19 
2:00 and 4:00 p.m. 
Kaufmann Theater 
Free 



The modem dance troupe 
Voices in Movement will 
perform selections from 
several different satin 
works, including "A Tale and 
Two Chairs " and "Memory 
Gland." Featured performer 
Laura Staton possess* 
unique style that comb 
theatrics, physicality. and a 



i L.plinesque sense of 
riumoi I ike silent film mod- 
em dance is a visually expres- 

art form that consists of 
distinctive elements such as 
space, time, rhythm and 

ire I Ins performance 
promises to heighten the 
audience's awarei 
movement and other facets 



of nonverbal commurm aln >n 
The program will be signed 
as v. Hit 

iWe lor I. linily audiences. No 
nd no reservat: 
this free | 
gran i iting i . limited and 

On a first come, first served 
I Iditional informa- 
(212)769-5186. 



The First 125 Years 



Three new exhibitions 
offer fascinating looks 
into the Museum's 125 
years of exploration and 
discovery. 

The First 125 Years, in 
the Hall of Birds of the 
World, is a decade-by- 
decade survey of the 
Museum's growth with 
photographs, 
specimens, and memora- 
bilia. 

People and Places, in 
the Akeley Gallery, is a 
display of photographs 
from around the world 
taken during Museum 
expeditions. 

The World Explored: 
125 Years of Collecting 
Photographs, in the Li- 
brary Gallery, features 
highlights from the Mu- 
seum's extensive collec- 
tions of photographs 
and films. 




I urn 0l " 

ceremonial drat, AMNH 1833 



Friends of Fishes presents 

Striped Bass: Tag and Release 



On Friday. November 25, 
at 8.30 a.m., participant* will 
board the Pastime Princess 
for Friends of Fishes' third 
annual striped bass tag-and- 
release program. The vessel, 
captained by George Rich 
ford, will depart from pier 1 1 
at the South Street Seaport. 

Participants In lost year's 
Mp — who were assisted by 
John Waldman of the Hud- 
son River Foundon- m, I om 
Lake of Friends oi I ishes 
baykeeper Andy Wilner, and 
Captain Joe Shastay — 
tagged and released 65 
striped bj 

Tickets for the trip are 
$100 per person, and enroll- 
ment is limited to 30. Food 
and beverages are included in 
the ticket price, and all pro- 
ceeds go to the Department 
of Ichthyology for basic fish 
resean h 

Use the coui h >n at right to 
register and call (212) 289- 
3605 or fax (212) 360-6625 
for furthei information. 



Friends of Fishes Registration Form. Tag and 

Release. Friday, November 25 



Number of tickets at $100:. 

Total amount enclosed: 

Name: ^___ 



Address: 
City 



.State: 



.Zip:. 



Daytime telephone:. 



Membership category: 



Please make check payable to Friends of Fishes/AMNH 
and mail with a self-addressed, stamped envelope 

Friends of Fishes. Dept. of Ichthyology. AMNH. 
7 c )th Street and Central Park West, New York. NY 
10024-5192. 



Natural History 

Expedition 

to New Zealand 



Discovery Tours has 
planned a new itinerary for 
late winter, from February 22 
to March 8, that uses a com- 
bination of land, sea, and air 
transport to explore the late- 
summer beauty of New 
Zealand. 

Few countries of compara- 
ble size offer the variety of 
New Zealand's stunning natu- 
ral beauty: lush rain forests, 
snow-capped peaks and spec- 
tacular alpine areas, dramatic 
fjords, verdant pasturelands, 
and mineral-rich thermal re- 
gions that are fueled by fires 
deep in the earth Because of 
its long isolation from other 
land masses. New Zealand 
has a unique natural heritage; 
this heritage has been fos- 
tered by a long history of 
conservation and protection 
of indigenous species and 
wilderness areas. 

The itinerary includes a 
cruise aboard the research 
vessel Professor Shokalski to 
explore the fjords and wilder- 



ness of the South Island. On 
the North Island, where the 
Maori people first landed 
after sailing from Polynesia, 
discover their rich culture and 
tradition of oral history. 

An integral part of this and 
every Discovery Cruise/Tour 
is a comprehensive and 
stimulating educational pro- 
gram that consists of illus- 
trated lectures and informal 
discussions by a team of 
distinguished scientists and 
researchers. American Mu- 
seum lecturers, naturalists, 
and guides on this expedition 
include a paleontologist/geol- 
ogist, a biogeographer, a his- 
torian/conservationist, and a 
wildlife specialist. 

The price is $6,990- 
$7,990 (per person, double 
occupancy). For more infor- 
mation call Discovery 
Cruises/Tours at (800) 462- 
8687 or in New York State at 
(212) 769-5700, Monday 
through Friday, 900 a.m. to 
5:00 p.m. 



Eco Impact Forum 



On Tuesday, November 
29, at 6:30 p.m., lecturer 
Mark Priest presents Environ- 
mental Impacts on Recre- 
ational Fishing. Pnest is 
president of the New York 
City chapter of Trout Unlim- 
ited. Inc 

This free program is part of 
an ongoing series of lectures 



that focus on environmental 
issues of concern to the 
greater metropolitan area. No 
tickets or reservations are 
necessary for the one-hour 
lecture, which will take place 
in the Linder Theater. For 
additional information about 
this program call (212) 769- 
5750. 



Celebrate 



The Royal Tombs 
of Sipan 

With Peruvian Specialities at 
the Garden Cafe 

Lunch, Man-In: 11:30-3:30 



Weekend Brunch, Sat. Sun // / 

Dinner, In. ^m :, : ;w 

hu • 1 1 ationt tugaetted 

I nil thi Garden I af. al 2] ! f69 3865 

I oi Bled "ii the I ower Level 




Happenings at the Hayden 



Lectures 

Frontiers in Astronomy and 
Astrophysics 

On Tuesday. November 15. at 7:30 p.m., Robert 
n of the Space Telescope Science Institute 
will present an illustrated talk, "The Latest Findings 
from the Hubble Space Telescope." Brown will 

an update on the information gathered from 
the Hubble Space Telescope and take a look at its 
future investigations. 

On Monday. December 5. at 7:30 p.m., Michio 
Kaku. professor of theoretical physics at the City 
University of New York, will present an illustrated 
talk. Parallel Universes. Time Warps, and the 
Tenth Dimension." Kaku will discuss one proposed 
theory that explains all of the forces in the universe 
— time travel, what came before the Big Bang, and 
what is beyond the universe. 

These lectures are part of the Frontiers in As- 
tronomy and Astrophysics series. Tickets are $6 
foi Participating and Higher Members and $8 for 
non-Members. For information about ticket avail- 
ability and upcoming lectures, call (212) 769-5900. 
Use the coupon below to order tickets. 

Eleventh Annual 
Holiday Concert 

A Midwinter Night's Dream 

On Wednesday. December 14. and Thursday, 
December 15. at 7 30 p.m., the world-famous En- 
semble for Early Music returns to the Planetarium's 
Sky Theater for a medieval celebration of the holi- 
day season. Enjoy the music of the royal courts of 
Europe while the wizardry of the Planetarium's 
special effects transports you through a wonderful 
variety of environments, from castles bathed in 
moonlight to a cozy fireplace at an ancient inn to 
a pine forest under a brilliantly starry sky. 

Participating and Higher Members are entitled to 
four tickets at $18 each. Additional tickets may be 
purchased at the non-Members' price of $20 each. 
Use the coupon below to register, and for further 
information call (212) 769-5900. 

Sky Shows 

Update: The Universe 

New discoveries from space are made on a daily 
basis, including information about black holes, new 
planets, and colliding galaxies. This fast-paced Sky 
Show, which uses a "news magazine'" presentation, 
brings viewers up to date on all the latest astronomi- 
cal discoveries 

In the past three years telescopes such as the 
Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the European 
ROSAT. and the recently overhauled Hubble Space 
Telescope have been exploring the universe from 
space. At the same time, giant earth-bound tele- 
scopes scan the heavens, searching for signs of 
intelligent life in our galaxy Update The Universe 
explores cutting-edge research from the quest for 
extraterrestrial life to studies that peel back time in 
search of the dawn of creation. 

Star of Christmas 

November 23 through January 1 

At this holiday program viewers gaze out on a 
clear winter's night and travel back nearly 2.000 
years to explore the skies of the first Christmas. Just 
what led the Wise Men to Bethlehem? Was it a 
special star that no one else had seen before? A 
comet? Or something else? Join us for this special 
holiday tradition. 

Admission (Participating and Higher Members): 
Adults: $4 
Children (2-12). $2 
Call (212) 769-5100 for show schedule and non- 
Members prices. Please note that prices are subject 
to change without prior notice. 

Children's Shows 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers Children sing along with images of 
their favorite Sesame Street Muppets as they learn 



about rainbows, the phases of the moon, sunse 
and stars. Sat.. Nov 5 al LO I0a.m and Sat., 
Dec 3. at 10:30 and 1 1 45 a.m. Admission I 
Participating and Higher Members is $4 fol adults 
and $2 for children. Members can purchase up to 
four tickets at the Members price. 

Shows usually sell out in advance: reservations, by 
mail only, are necessary. Make yom chei k payable 
to the Hayden Planetarium (attn Wonderful Sky. 
Central Park West at 81st Street. New Y< irk NY 
10024-5192); indicate membership category and 
a first am I choice of showtimes. Be sure to 

include a self -addressed, stamped envelope and your 
daytime telephone number. For additional 
information call (212) 769-5900 

Robots in Space features Lucasfilm's R2D2 and 
C-3PO-* and has been created especially for chil- 
dren ages 7 to 12 Together with a live host, these 
famous space robots take children on a tour of the 
universe. See how satellites and probes — the real 
space robots — help us learn about worlds near 
and far. Journey from the earth to other planets 
and distant black holes. Sat . Nov. 5, and S 
Jan. 7. at 1 1:45 am Admission for Participating 
and Higher Members is $4 for adults and $2 for 
children. For information, call (212) 769-5900. 



Courses for Stargazers 

The Planetarium offers a variety of courses for 
adults and families in astronomy, meteorology, avia- 
tion, and navigation. For further Informatii in md a 
catalog of courses call (212) 769-5900. 



Laser Shows 

Joumey into another dimension where laser visu- 
als and rock music combine to create a dazzling 3-D 
experience of sight and sound. Shows are presented 
on Fridays and Saturdays at 7:00. 8:30, and 10.00 
p.m. For prices and show schedule, telephone 
(212) 769-5100. 

It's always a good idea to call before visit- 
ing the Planetarium, since prices, programs, 
and showtimes are subject to change without 
notice. For general Planetarium information, 
call (212) 769-5100. 



Holiday Concert. Please indicate a first and 
second choice of times. 

Wed.. Dec. 14 Thurs., Dec. 15 

Number of Members' tickets at $18: 

Number of non-Members' tickets at $20: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Lecture. "Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and 
the Tenth Dimension " Monday, December 5, 
7 30 p.m 
Number of Members' tickets at $6 

(no more than 4, please): 

Number of non-Members' tickets at $8: 

Total amount enclosed: 



Name:. 



Address: 
City: 



.State: 



.Zip 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: 



Please make check payable to the Hayden 
Planetarium and mail with a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to: Concert or Lectu 
Hayden Planetarium, Central Park West at 81st 
Street. New York. NY 10024-5192. 

Please note that ticket orders are subject 
availability and cannot be processed without 
telephone number and stamped, self -addressed 
envelope Do not include ticket requests or 
checks for American Museum programs. 



Museum Notes 

Hours 

Exhibition l lalls 

Mon -Thurs & Sun 10:00 a.n i p.m. 

in & Sal 10:00a m 8 15p m 

The Museum '"•hop 

Mon I hui s & Sun 10:00 

Fri. &Sat. LO 00a m ■ l i p.m 

The Junior Shi ip 

Mon I ii 10:00 a m I 45 p.m 

Sat. & Sun in mi ., mi i 15 p m 

I he Museum I Ibrary 

Tues In 11.00a.m.-4 00 p m 

The Natural S leni e Center 

For children of all ages and their famlll< 
Closed on H and holidays. 

Tues I rl ' on i m ,.m 

Sat. & Sun 1 00 1 10 p.m 

The Discovery Room 

Passes are distributed at the first flooi Informa- 
tion desk beginning at 11:4 ' i ' 
< 'htldren must be accompanied by an adult 
Closed on holidays and iveekdo* 

Sat. & Sun Noon I 10 p.m 

Museum Dining 
Diner Sam us I ist Service In 

Daily i i 00a m I I5p m 

Garden Cafe 

Reservations (212) 769-5865 

Lum h Mon Fri I I 10 a m 1:30 p.m. 

Dlnnei I rl 8 Sat. 5:00 1 10 p m 

Bn/M, h Sal & Sim I I 00 a.m. -4 00 p.m 

Whale I hi 

Fri Kin ..in i | mi, 

Sat N 8:00 p.m 

Sun. & most holiday) Noon r > 00 p m 

Snack Carts [al 1 7th i m the flrsl flow i il 

ili, I li Mi'iiu.n.il 1 1. ill) 

Sat. & Sun 1 1 00a in 1 <•(' p.m 



Parking 



l he Museum s parking li il m >w i >ffers expanded 
hours and revised rates fhi parking lol which Is 
opei.it. •< l in i onjuni Hon with the Edisi in l faj d< 
Corporation, Is open every day from 7:00 a.m till 
i i 10 p.m 

Rates for cars entering between 7:00 a.m and 
5:00 p.m start at $5 for up to a half-hour and 
advance by stages to a closing time maximum 
of $17. Cars entering between 5:00 p 
1 1 30 p m are i harged •> minimum of $. r > and a 
maxiinu f $7 onSunday throuqli Nun « l. • • . >ml .> 

maximum of $12 on I riday uid Saturd.n. 

Buses are charged $1 1 and are nol admitted on 
weekends. 

The parking lot has a capacity of 1' )(i v.-h 
and is operated on a first-corn, fit d basis. 

Hertz Manhattan, located one block aw. ly from the 
Museum at 210 West 77th ' Itreel [between 
Broadway and Amsterdam), offers pari Hints 

to Members: on Monda< thr< iugh I riday Memb 
receive a $2 discount off regular prii • and on 
Saturday and Sunday 1 I leyreo Ivi ■> '' tdlSCOUnl 

Call the Membership Olli- •.,! (212) 769 1606 
for information about alternative parking 



Naturemax 



Hi. new IMAX film Africa: The Serengeti 
plores the relatli inshipfl I "'tween predator and prey 
by following the great migration of wildebeests, 
zebras, and other animals. Sli ire 10:30 

and M 50 a m and 1 30 and 3:30 p.m da!l| 

Yellowstone take versonajoumi 
discover the history, geology, and wildlife ol th< 
national park. Showtimes ar< 1 2 10 ' 10 and 

4:30 pm 

On Friday and Satu I 6 00 and n . 

Africa The Serengeti Is shown On <j double hill 
with Yellowstone Schedules and pric i 
to change without notice Call (212) 7l I for 

further Information. See page 5 for details ol thi 

Members' evening at Naturen 

Admission (Particip I I ligher Members) 

Adults $4 75 Single feature; $6 double feature 
< hlklren %2 25 single feature; $3.25 double 

feature 






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For Participating and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



Vol 19. No 11 December 1994 










Female lions raise the young and do most of the hunting. 
Lions are one of the many predators featured in Africa: The Serengeti. 



Members' Private Viewing at the Naturemax Theater 

Africa: The Serengeti and 
Yellowstone 

Wednesday, December 21 

7:00p.m. .... L M . 

$6, and open only to Participating and Higher Members 



Members' night at the Naturemax 
Theater — a double-feature showing 
of Africa: The Serengeti and Yellow- 
stone — will take viewers on an 
IMAX safari across the plains of East 
Africa and inside the world's most 
famous geyser. 

Every year more than a million 
wildebeests undertake the great migra- 
tion across the Serengeti in search of 
water, greener pastures, and their 
ancient calving grounds. They travel 
from 500 to 800 miles in the course 
of this eight-month odyssey The 
great migration has been perfected 



and balanced over millennia; dozens 
of species have adapted over time and 
depend on the migration as a crucial 
element of their thriving, self-sustain- 
ing ecosystem. 

The wildebeests are preceded by 
200,000 zebras, which crop the 
coarse grasses, making them more 
palatable for wildebeests The wilde- 
beests are followed by half a million 
gazelles, which feed on the even more 
closely trimmed grass Along the jour- 
ney the migrating animals are stalked 
by numerous predators. Lions, chee- 
tahs, wild dogs, hyenas, and other 



animals depend on the herbivores for 
a constant food supply. The predators 
help maintain a natural balance by 
culling the weaker or slower animals. 
Africa. The Serengeti is 40 minutes 
long and narrated by James Earl 
Jones. 

America's oldest and largest na 
tional park is explored in Yellow- 
stone, a spectacular journey with 
highlights ranging from sunrise over 
the Grand Tetons to a nver trip to the 
brink of the Grand Canyon's l< 

rails 
The 2 2 million acre national park. 



which was created in 1872. covers an 
area larger than Rhode Island and 
Delaware combined. The earth 

i rust, winch is nil*.. H 

mllej thii i Is only 3 to 4 miles thick 
in il „ Yellow i -lie area and is cracked 
from streti hing. The film examines 
the park's volcanic w« 

a before seen footage of the in- 
side of Old Faithful Yellowstone also 

,ii (he park S history and Its 
beavers, bears, elk, and other wild 
denizens The film ib 32 minutes long. 

Use the December Members' pro- 
grams coupon on page 3 to register. 



Wauja 

Sharing 

Rituals 

Saturday, 
December 3 

Kids will play a trading 
game based on an Amazo- 
nian Indian tradition at the 
Members' family workshop 
Wauja Sharing Rituals. The 
Wauja (pronounced WOW 
sha) of Brazil engage in a 
Friendly system of barter with 
other tribes. The custom 
transforms a material obliga- 
Uon that's similar to taxation 
into a joyous celebration of 
generosity 

Each child will be given two 
each of a variety of items 
(mi *tly miniatures of Amazo- 
nian animals) — one to keep 
and one to barter As the; 
in a circle and trade and bar- 

: i for rubber lizards, par- 
rots, and coatimundis, the 
i lnldren experience the fun of 
sharing and discover that 
everyone can be a winnei 

The workshops are pre- 
sented by anthropologist Emi- 
lienne Ireland. The 11:00 
.1 in to-noon workshop is for 
participants between the i i 

I I and 8, and the 1:30- 
I 1 10 p.m. program is for 9- 
i.l 2-year-olds. Tickets are 
$16 per couple for Members 
and $20 per couple for non- 
Members. Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register, and please 
note that ti( kets <ire available 
only by mail. 

Precolumbian 
Gold 

Tuesday, December 6 

Members can take a guided 
tour of the Metropolitan Mu 
seum of Art's Jan Mitchell 
I i. i I 'let < .lumliMii 

works of art in gold, which 
com i 'i i ■■■'•■. items from all the 
goldworking areas of the 
ancient Americas. The 250 
works on display, which trace 
the development of metal- 

tei hnology, include 
jewelry and funerary offerings 



and cover a wide range of 
periods, styles, and regions. 
They range in date from the 
last centuries of the first mil- 
lennium BC until the time of 
the Spanish conquest in the 
early sixteenth century 

Tours will take place at 
100. 300. and 400 p.m. 
Before and after the 45- 
minute tours Members can 
explore the museum's other 
exhibitions until closing time 
al 5 15 p.m. Tickets are $18 
and available only to Partici- 
pating and Higher Members. 
Use the coupon on page 5 to 
register, and please note that 
tickets are available only by 
mail. 



Geology off 
the Planets 

Thursdays, 
December 8 and 1 5 



The moons of Jupiter, 
Mercury's cratered surface, 
and the Martian equivalent of 
the Grand Canyon are among 
the local points of a two-part 
lecture series. Geologist 
Sidney Horenstein, the 
Museum's coordinator of 
environmental public pro- 
grams, will use slides and 
videos to take Members on a 
geological voyage around the 
solar system. 

The lectures will begin at 
7.00 p.m. in the Kaufmann 
I heater. Tickets are $15 for 
Members and $20 for non- 
Members. Use the December 
Members' programs coupon 
i m I'.jge 3 to register 



Origami 
Holiday 
Workshops 

Sunday, December 11 



Members of all ages can 
learn to fold charming 
origami models of animals, 
stars, and other figures at the 
sixteenth annual Origami 
Holiday Workshops Mu 








seum volunteers and mem 
bers of Origami USA will be 
on hand to instruct partici- 
pants, and Members will re- 
ceive origami paper and 
instructions to take home. 

The Young Children's 
Workshop is geared toward 
children between the ages of 
4 and 6, and the Beginners' 
Workshop toward ages 6 and 
older. Participants in the In- 
termediate Workshop, which 
is for ages 7 and older, should 
be comfortable with origami 
folds such as mountains and 
valleys, rabbit ears, inside- 
reverse, and squash folds. 

The workshops will take 
place at 10:30 and 11 30 
am and at 2:00 and 3:00 
p.m. There is a $3 materials 
fee per person, and tickets 
are available only to Partici- 
pating and Higher Members. 
Use the coupon on page 3 to 
register. 



Make a 
Holiday 
Gingerbread 
House 

Saturday, 
December 17, and 
Sunday, December 18 



Candy canes, jelly beans, 
and gumdrops are the sweet 
tools of the trade at the Mem- 
bers' annual gingerbread- 
house-making workshop. 
June Myles will show partici- 
pants how to raise the roof- 
beams of the no-bake houses, 
and parents and kids can use 
a variety of colorful candies 
and cookies to decorate their 
gingerbread houses and 
apartments. 

The workshops, which are 
appropriate for children be- 
tween the ages of 5 and 10, 
will take place from 10:30 
a.m. to noon and from 1:30 
to 3:00 p.m. Tickets are $30 
per couple and available only 
to Participating and Higher 
Members. Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register, and please 
note that tickets are available 
only by mail . 



Two Armadillos, a Wauja drawing 



Toyland 
Express 

Thursday, 
December 29 



Toys from the past, pres- 
ent, and future are the cargo 
of the Toyland Express, a 
musical revue presented by 
the Bob Brown Puppets. 
Children will be fascinated by 
the singing and dancing mari- 
onettes, which include a 
juggling teddy bear, a jack-in- 
the-box, a transformer robot, 
and a space alien. 

The performance, which is 
appropriate for children be- 
tween the ages of 4 and 8. 
will take place at 100 and 
3.00 p.m. in the Kaufmann 
Theater. Tickets are $7 for 
Members and $ 1 for non- 
Members. Use the coupon on 
page 3 to register 




Geology of the Planets on December 8 and 15 




ISSN 0194-61 10 

Vol. 19, No 11 
December 1994 

Donna Bell — Editor 

Sheila Greenberg — Manager of Membership Services 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Yolanda Loften — Fulfillment Coordinator 

Robert Jahn — Program Coordinator 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and Higher 
Members of the American Museum of Natural History, is 
published monthly September through June, bimonthly July and 
August Publication offices are at Natural History magazine, 
American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th 
Street, New York, NY 10024-5192. Telephone: (212) 769- 
5606. Subscriptions: $50 a year for Participating Membership; 
$100 a year for Contributor Membership 
© 1994 American Museum of Natural History. Second-class 
postage paid at New York. NY. Postmaster: Please send address 
changes to: Rotunda, Membership Office. American Museum of 
Natural History. Central Park West at 79th Street. New York. 
NY 10024-5192 

Statement of ownership, management, and circulation title of publi- 
cation: Rotunda (ISSN 0194-6110). Date of filing: Sept. 14, 1994. 
Frequency of issue. Monthly except for July/ August issue. Number of 
issues published annually 11 Annual subscription pnee: $50 a year 
for Participating Members, $100 a year for Contributor Members 
Complete mailing address of known office of publication: Central Park 
West at 79th Street. New York, NY 10024-5192. Complete mailing 
address of the headquarters or general business offices of the publish- 

->ame Publisher L Thomas Kelly. American Museum of Natural 
History. Central Park West at 79th Street. New York, NY 10024- 
5192 Managing Editor: None Owner: American Museum of Natural 
History. Central Park West at 79th Street, New York. NY 10024- 
5192 Known bondholders, mortgages, and other security holders: 
None The purpose, function and nonprofit status of this organization 
and the exempt status for Federal income tax purposes has not 
changed dunng the preceding 12 months. Extent and nature of circula- 
tion: (A) signifies average number of copies of each issue during pre- 
ceding 12 months, and (B) signifies average number of copies of single 
issue published nearest to filing date. Total number of copies (A) 
39,473. (B) 41.241 Paid circulation through sales through dealers 
and carriers, street vendors and counter sales (A) None. (B) None 
Mail subscription (A) 38.365. (B) 39,241 Total paid circulation (A) 
38,365, (B) 39.241 Free distribution by mail, earner, or other means, 
samples, complimentary and other free copies: (A) 936. (B) 1.800 
Total distrl iA) 39.301, (B) 41.041 Copies not distribute- 

172, (B) 200 Return from news agents: (A) None. (B) None Total (A) 

1 73, (B) 4 1 ,24 1 I certify that the statements made by me above are 
correct ami i . sifll ied) Donna Bell. Editor 

Printed by Waldon Press, Inc., New York 



1 



The Monkey Wars 

Thursday, January 26 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$5 for Members, $8 for non-Members 



The debate over animal 
research is a war — a war 
over control and a philosophi 
cal war about who we are. As 
the earth's dominant species 
ve without responsibility 
except to our own kind, or 
are we stewards of the 
planet? Should scientists and 
researchers be accountable to 
the community at large for 
their practices, or should the 
importance of their work 
accord them a "no questions 
asked" policy? What role do 
the media play in this debate, 
and how can they make sci- 
ence more accessible to the 
public? 

Journalist Deborah Blum, a 
science writer for the Sacra- 
mento Bee. will explore this 
complicated issue at a Mem- 
bers' program based on her 
new book from Oxford Uni- 
versity Press, The Monkey 
Wars. Originally a series of 
investigative articles for the 
Bee that won a Pulitzer Prize 
and the AAAS-Westinghouse 
Award, The Monkey Wars 
takes an in-the-rrenches look 
at the raging battle over the 
use of primates in scientific 
research. It features exclusive 
interviews with the top repre- 
sentatives on both sides, from 
Alex Pacheco, founder of 
People for Ethical Treatment 




A look at the use of primates in scientific research 



of Animals, the country's 
most powerful animal rights 
group, to Peter Gerone. head 
of the federal primate center 
at Tulane University. 

The Monkey Wars vividly 
brings to life the views of 
scientists and researchers 
desperately searching for life- 
saving cures, the intelligent 



and sensitive primates that 
undergo grueling experiments 
to serve that end, and the 
people who make saving the 
primates their life's work- 
Blum's book will be avail- 
able for purchase at the pro- 
gram, and she will sign copies 
after the show. Use the 
coupon at right to register. 



Members' Behind-the-Scenes Tours of the 

Department of Invertebrates 

Saturday, January 21 

$12, and open only to Participating and Higher Members 

Appropriate for ages 13 and up 



The history of life on earth, 
from time immemorial into 
the future — that's the scope 
of the Department of Inverte- 
brates' studies. Next month 
Members can take a look 
behind the scenes in Inverte- 
brates, visiting collection 
areas and labs that are never 
open to the general public to 
hear about ongoing research 
projects 

Scientists from the depart- 
ment will be on hand to de- 
scribe their work and display 
specimens they've collected in 
the field. By examining the 
record of fossil and modem 
invertebrates scientists classify 
a diverse group of animals, 
documenting their evolution 
and (sometimes) their extinc- 
tion. 

Members will also learn 
about the department's role 
in preparing an upcoming 
exhibition on biodiversity. 
This major exhibition, which 
is scheduled to open in 1996. 
will explore evolutionary and 
ecological aspects of diversity, 
the causes of mass extinctions 
of the geological past, and 



the imminent threat to mod- 
em diversity posed by human 
habitat destruction. 
The tours last about one 



hour Use the coupon below 
to register, and please note 
that tickets are available only 
by mail. 



Behind-the-Scenes Tours of the Department of 
Invertebrates. Saturday, January 21. $12, and open 
only to Participating and Higher Members. Tours will 
leave at 15-minute intervals. We will send you confirma- 
tion by mail indicating the exact time your tour will start 
Please indicate a preference. 

_ Between 10:30 am and noon 
Between 115 and 230 p.m. 

Number of tickets at $12 each: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 



Name 



Address: 
City. 



State: 



.Zip:. 



Please make check payable to the American Museum of 
Natural History and mail with a self-addressed, stamped 
envelope to: Behind the Scenes. Membership Office. 
American Museum of Natural History. Central Park West 
at 79th Street. New York. NY 10024-5192. 



December 
Members' 
Programs Coupon 



Name: 



Address: 



City: 



.State: 






Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: . 



Total amount enclosed:. 



Please make check (if applicable) | American 

Museum of Natural History and mail with B self- 
addressed, stamped envelope u< I >e< < , m/><»i Members' 
Programs. Membership Office American Museum of 

Natural History, Central Park Wi 9th Streel New 

York. NY 10024 5192 Telephone reservations are not 
accepted. No refunds or exchanges. 

Unless otherwise indicated, no more than eight 
tickets may be ordered for a program. Partici- 
pating Members are entitled to four tickets per 
program at the Members' price. Higher Members 
are entitled to six tickets, and Associate Members 
are entitled to one ticket. 

Geology of the Planets. Thursday. December 8 and 15, 
7:00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $15: 

Number of additional tickets at $20: 

Total amount enclosed for program-. 

Origami Holiday Workshops. Sunday. December 1 I 
Please indicate workshop level and a first, se< i ind and third 
choice of times. 

Young Children's Workshop 

Beginners' Workshop 

Intermediate Workshop 

10:30 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 

2:00 p m 3:00 p.m. 

Number of Member. in kets >t $3: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Members* private viewing at the Naturemax Theater 

Wednesday, December 21, 7:00 p m 

Number of Members' tickets at $6: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Toyland Express. Thursday. December 29. 
Please indicate a first and second choice. 

1:00 p.m. 300 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $7: 

Number of additional tickets at $10: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Seven Years in the Life of a Grizzly Family 

Thursday, January 19, 7 00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $8: 

Number of additional Hi kets at $12: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

The Monkey Wars. Thursday, January 26, 7:00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $5: 

Number of additional ti< kets 't $8: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Undersea Safari. Saturday, January 28 Please Indicat 

first and second choice. 

1:30 p.m. _ I 10 p.m, 

Number of Members' tickets at $5: 

Number of additional tickets at $8: 

Total amount enclosed for i n < »qi mm 

About the Jews of India: Cochin. Tuesday, January 31. 
700 pm 

Number of Members' tickets at $7: 

Number of additional til kets at $10: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

NOTE: Orders received less than ten days before 
show dates will be held for pick-up at the door on 
the day of the program if tickets are still available. If 
an event is sold out. you will be advised in writing or 
by phone and your check will be returned. 






Undersea Safari 

Saturday, January 28 

1:30 and 3:30 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater _ u ™ 

$5 for Members, $8 for non-Members 

Ages 4-8 



A musical voyage with Chris Rowlands 



Young Members will 
venture under the sea with 
award-winning singer- 
songwriter Chris Rowlands 
They'll leam about tidepools. 
the food chain, high and low 
tides, and myriad sea crea- 
tures. 

Undersea Safari is a high- 
energy show that combines 
music, humor, and fascinating 
facts (a blue whale is as big as 
three schoolbuses back to 
back — its arteries are so big 



that you could walk through 
them!) Kids clap and sing 
along with catchy songs about 
the value of protecting the 
oceans and all their inhabi- 
tants. 

Chris Rowlands has per- 
formed his popular programs 
on recycling and marine life 
at schools, fairs, and nature 
centers throughout the east- 
ern United States. Use the 
December Members' coupon 
on page 3 to register. 



Members' Workshop 

Identifying Rocks 
and Their Minerals 

Tuesdays, January 10, 17, and 24 
5:30-7:30 p.m. 
$60, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 



Here's the chance to learn 
the difference between ig- 
neous. sedimentary, and 
metamorphic rocks Geologist 
Sidney Horensteln, the Mu- 
seum's coordinator of envi 
ronmental public programs, 
will hosl a workshop that 
xl iows how to identify and 
classify the major groups of 
1 1 k ks and how to recognize 
the indicators of their geologi- 



cal significance 

Participants will learn about 
ih« minerals that are the 
building blocks of rocks from 
actual specimens and Mu- 

m exhibits After the 
three- part workshop they will 
not take any rock for granite. 
Use the coupon on page 5 
to register, and please note 
that tickets are available only 
by mail. 



Seven Years in the life 
of a Grizzly Family 

Thursday, January 19 
7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$8 for Members, $12 for non-Members 




Ranger Rick Mclntyre will 
introduce Members to Little 
Stony and his family, a bear 
clan that Mclntyre observed 
over a seven-year period in 
Alaska's Denali National 
Park. 

Little Stony and Mclntyre 
met when the cub was jusi 
five months old and the size 
of a teddy bear. Restless and 
energetic. Stony was often 
seen attempting to coax his 
sedate mother into play, nib- 
bling the rubber bumpers of 
cars, batting at traffic cones, 
or rolling in roadside mead- 
ows for amused tourists. 

By the time he was a full- 
grown grizzly Stony's insa- 
tiable curiosity and appetite 
led him into serious trouble. 
Stony's story, which Mclntyre 
recorded in Grizzly Cub. Fine 
Years in the Life of a Bear 
(Alaska Northwest Books, 
1990). dramatizes the conflict 
between the rights of park 
visitors to experience nature 
and the needs of wildlife to 
live unhampered by humans. 
Mclntyre will show spectac- 




Little Stony and his mother 



ular slides of Stony, his 
mother, and his younger twin 
sisters, as well as pictures of 
the park's other denizens — 
wolves, Dall sheep, caribou, 
and moose. His work with the 
National Park Service has 
brought him to Denali for 14 
summers as a seasonal park 
ranger, and his outdoor and 
wildlife photography and 
writing have appeared in 



numerous publications. His 
book Denali National Park: 
An Island in Time appeared 
in 1986. Mclntyre is donating 
a portion of his royalties from 
Grizzly Cub to the newly 
established Grizzly Fund, 
which is sponsored by the 
Denali Foundation. 

Use the December Mem- 
bers' programs coupon on 
page 3 to register. 



About the 
Jews of India: 
Cochin 



Tuesday, January 31 

7:00 p.m. 

Main Auditorium 

$7 for Members, $10 for non-Members 



In 1961. when ethnomusi- 
cologist Johanna Spector first 
visited the Cochin area of 
Southwest India's Malabar 
coast, she studied and pho- 
tographed the Jewish com- 
munity that had lived and 
prospered there for nearly 
2,000 years. By 1976, when 
About the Jews of India 
Cochin was completed, most 
of the 4,000 residents had 
resettled in Israel 

About the Jews of India 
Cochin is the first of Spec- 
tor's two films about the com- 
munity. (The second film, 
2.000 Years of Freedom 
and Honor The Cochin 
Jews of India, premiered at 
the Museum in 1993.) The 
Rrsl film focuses on the com- 
munity's history, material 
( uhure. and religious customs 
to reconstruct a way of life 
that no longer exists. 



The film combines still 
photographs taken in 1961 
and footage shot in the 
1970s with archival material, 
graphics, artifacts, and oral 
and documented history of 
the community. Authentic 
music of the Cochin Jews, 
recorded for the first time by 
Spector, accompanies the 
entire film. 

Although the Cochin com- 
munity adamantly maintained 
its Jewish identity it could not 
avoid the influence of Hindu 
society: contrary to Jewish 
law. it developed a castelike 
internal system that persisted 
until the 1950s, when the 
community left for Israel. Its 
three endogamic groups were 
the meyuhasim ( "of 
lineage"), the malabaris 
("black Jews"), and the 
meshuhrahm (freed slaves 
or their descendants"). 



In a country unusually free 
of anti-Semitism, the Cochin 
Jews rose to high office and 
served as the advisers and 
emissaries of the rajahs Their 
prosperous, influential, and 
peaceful existence continued 
throughout the colonial Dutch 
and British periods; however 
when Israel was established in 
1948 they felt that their age- 
old prayers had been 
answered, and they returned 
to their ancient homeland. 

Spector will introduce the 
30-minute film and answer 
questions after its screening 
This program is two hours 
long and the second in a se_ 
ries of Spector' s ethnographic 
films. An upcoming featun 
will profile the Jews of 
Yemen. 

Use the December Mem- 
bers' program coupon on 
page 3 to register. 



Kwanzaa Chilean 

Celebration Festival 



Kwanzaa is an African- 
American holiday that cele- 
brates the richness and 
diversity of centuries of 
African culture and values 
that survived the diaspora. 
The observance of Kwanzaa 
offers African-derived cultures 
an opportunity to explore 
their roots and recognize their 
collective identity. 



CANCELLED 

In conjunction with the 
Mission of Chile, the Depart- 
ment of Education presents a 
mini-festival of films and a 
series of performances that 
celebrate Chilean culture and 
reflect social, political, and 
environmental conditions. 
Performance: Los Tres. 
December 9, at 8:00 p.m. in 
the Kaufmann Theater 

Rim festival. December 2, 
7:30 p.m.; December 3 and 
4. 1:00-5:00 p.m.. Kauf- 
mann Theater 



African World 

Marketplace Celebrations 



Friday, December 30 
Noon-5:00 p.m. 

A traditional African village 
market — with all its colorful 
activities, dynamic interac- 
tion, and gaiety — will be re- 
created at the Museum as 
part of the Kwanzaa celebra- 
tion. 

In the Hall of Invertebrates 
(first floor), artisans will ex- 
hibit and sell Afro-centric 
products such as carvings, 
traditional textiles, and jew- 
elry. The Hall of Ocean Life, 
also on the first floor, will 
feature African foods and 
performances. 



Weekend programs at the 
Leonhardt People Center will 
take a cross-cultural look at 
winter, harvest, and ritual 
celebrations around the 
world. The programs — 
which will include slide-illus- 
trated talks, lecture-demon- 
strations, and films — will 
take place on December 3, 4 
10, 11. 17. and 18. 



For information or a 
brochure detailing these 
events, call the Education 
Department at (212) 769- 

5315. 



Btnrf«iw*fcbyglli 

■ 

■Up 

\cl Wal ** Ni * 



" " 

-ITXjt 



Tours. Day Trips, and Workshops. Use ^coupon 
to register for the guided tour Precolumbian Gold (indi- 
ate a rst and second choice of times* and the .work- 
shops Vegetable Carving (md.cate a ^£*"°£ rals 
choice of times), /denfi/ying Rocks and ^rMmerah 
Make a Holiday Gingerbread House (please state wn.ch 
day and a first a'nd second choice of times), and Wau,a 



^rgRi/uolTrbeTure to indicate 11 00 am forages 
4-8 or 1:30 p.m. for ages 9-12). 



I Name(s) of program(s): 



! Number of tickets and price (please indicate which pro 
| gram if more than one): 



Total amount enclosed: 



Royal Tombs of Sipan 

Precolumbian treasures from the richest tombs 
ever excavated in the Western Hemisphere 




A glittering array of gold, silver, 
and gilded copper artifacts are 
on display in Gallery 3's Royal 
Tombs of Sipan. The exhibition 
explores the culture and art of 
the Moche. a pre-lnca civilization 
that dominated northern Peru 
from AD 100 to 800. Archeolo- 
gists discovered the first Moche 
royal tomb in 1987 at a small 
eroded adobe brick pyramid near 
the Peruvian village of Sipan. 

The exhibition will be on 
display until January 1. There is 
an additional charge for viewing 
this special exhibition; the Mem- 
bers' price is $4 for adults and 
$2 for children. 

Among the exhibitions trea- 
sures are gold and turquoise ear 
ornaments (top), a gold and 
silver peanut necklace (below 
left), and a gold and turquoise 
ear ornament depicting a warrior 
(below right). 



Name: 



! Address: 



City: 



_State: 



Daytime telephone:. 



[ Membership category: — . — — - Museum of 

! Please make check payable to the American Mu«.um 

! Natural History and mail with a """"^X ' 
! stamped envelope to Tou V",um^ Nafura 
! Membership Office. American Museum of Nat u^ 
1 H.story. Central Park West at 79th btreei. 
• NY 10024-5192. 




! 



TO ..organized by" "TV, 

ofSS UC^ and .he I 

°l MuM , Peru with the cooperation "™ 

SaStToSiw. Peru, and support I, flv 

EnSolen. for the H— sand n 

dat.on Us presen.at.on at Ihfl American Museum has been 



tynippoitedb! th following " 

iPRENSA 

V 



Members' Workshop 

The Art of Vegetable 
and Fruit Carving 

Sunday. Ja" ua iV 8 , ft „ m 

\ffitt22S ^Participating and Hi 8 he, Members 



Since ancient times Thai 
women have transformed 
ordinary fruits and vegetables 
into works of art Using only 
a couple of sharp knives and 
garden-variety products, they 
create out -of -season flowers 
and exotic garnishes for the 
dinner table 



Artist Kalaya Tongchareon 
Paragas will show Members 
how to make their own veg- 
etable and fruit carvings. 
They'll make beautiful t lowers 
from carrots, i iicumbers, 
onions, and pumpkins Partic- 
ipants should bring a paring 
knife and a small, sharp carv 



ing knife with a point. -I Up 
and a three-ii"- 1' blade. Ves- 
ctabl. and fruits will be sup 
piled to partli Ipants 

Use the coupon at left to 
reg jsi it .-« if) minute 

workshop, and plea K nob 
that tickets are available only 
by mail 



Letter from 
the Gobi 

by Priscilla McKenna 



Euer V V ear since 1990 P^^cllloel'^ 

£««« OV a tetter /rem expedition member 

Priscl//a McKen/M 



Wednesday. July 22, 1992 

Naran Bulak ("Sunny Spring ). Mongolia 

"Z^SStte yesterday at sundown after ^ 
hfnk.nqThat even without roads we would cover the 

174& flgfi ™ les to this ,amous desert ° aS 

^Whatwe didn't take into account was that the 

parts and batteries of the R^^"^ ^.^ 
were using were positively antediluvian and that 
The r radiators were designed for Russian* winters 
not Gobi summers. Neither did we an .apate that 
Sent rainstorms would have turned the valley 
bottoms and stream beds into pits of impassable 

Tmally. after four amazing days of travel we are 
hpr P at Naran Bulak, an oasis fed by a beautiful 
artesian s P "ng. This will be our headquarters while 
we explore the Nemegt Valley. 

We are an armada - eight vehicles and 1 / peo 
nleSix of us come from the American Museum 
' „ Clark and Mark Norell. Lowell Dingus and Mike 
Novacek. Malcolm McKenna P^"*^ 
and me. each pair riding in one of the Museum s 
three Mitsubishi 4 x 4, Our ^gear levels . itfj 
AMNH's Russian-made military GAZ 66 truck 
J will call It GAZ UI) with Batsuk at the wheel GAZ 
sThe Russian acronym for People s Automobile 
Factory The BBC-TV crew of three travels »n a 
GAZ Jeep with their mountain of gear on GAZ 111, 
drVven by Ot. Our Mongolian paleontologist col- 
logue Dr. Demberilyn Dashzeveg, travels in the 
etd truck GAZ I. which belongs to the Mongolian 
Academy of Sciences and is driven by Mangaljav. 

Andfcen there is the gasoline tank truck carrying 
ou^predous 3.000 liters of 93 octane gas. essential 
,' ' ,'he Mitsubishis. We have christened this ,beh - 
moth the Benzene Machine and its dnver Ba ntog 
Sns has become Benzena. which he thinks ,s a 
nrpat ioke He has already broken the tanker s wind- 
s' wim a snapped tow cable, and that's a good 
uq because he chain smokes while he s driving 
O ur cook. Chooloona. keeps him company in 
,h gale that blows through the front seat. The 
mechanic/laborer who ndes in the back of GAZ 1 

^Sr^ol 1 tolO^e^us^ea 

7 (the qas tanks keep splitting); GAZ 11 a 5, W\L \\ 
I 4 fc there really anything wrong with it or does Ot 

. 't, WroaM GAZ 1 a 6 (we were only 10 
KE3 on r th a e k f irsPdTy when its differentia, broke 
u D V and the Benzene Machine stands (or falls) at -2 
The problem is that the tanker's gasoline ,s our vital 
connection to the outside world and home, and we 
c^nnof allow ourselves to be separated from it no 
matter how erratic its behavior. 

We spent last week collecting fossils from the late 
Cretaceous exposures at the Flaming Cliffs and 
Tuqmgeen. where we found Protoceratops. Veloci- 
aptor and other dromaeosaurs and Mononykus 
a d noiur-like bird) and Zalambdelestes (a rare 
small mammal). Despite our success. V* gently 
awaited our crossing of the 9.000-foot Nemegt 
Sang" to travel deep into the southern Gobi and 
exolore the great fossil localities of the Nemegt 
VaC The BBC filmed us extensively at Tugrugeen 
and we were all ready for a change of scene. 

As on all our travels. Malcolm drives while I keep 
the expedition road log with the help of a Global 
Positioning System (GPS) receiver, which is con- 




nected to an antenna on the roof of our M, su. We 
also have portable walkie-talkies in each Mitsu 

You must remember that the Gob. has no devel- 
oped roads, only ruts and tracks, and mostly there is 
noting. There are no fences, so all J* go where 
they please. If you come across a senes of tracks, 
apparently heading in the same general direchon 
and criss-crossing each other you know that you 
have found a major thoroughfare that probably 
leads to a town or a mountain pass. There are no 
bridges or culverts to help the hapless dnver across 
wet and muddy places, so when you come to such 
places you look them over carefully and quite often 
V ou turn back and go around. 
' So here, from my road log. is our ^rkable 
Proqress from Tugrugeen to Naran Bulak. in dis- 
tance only 174 bird miles but in time four long days. 

Saturday. July 18. 1992 

From Tugrugeen to the south slope of Artsa Bogd 
(Small Holy One"), a mountain range 

10 30 a.m. Having packed up. we drove to the 
top of a hill above Tugrugeen camp and lined up 
the vehicles for a TV expedition shot. It could not 
be taken yet because GAZ HI was broken down and 
hadn't made it to the top of the hill. Little did we 
realize that this was an ominous harbinger ot our 

immediate future. 

11 15 am. GAZ 111 made it to the top. HurTay! 
The expedition shot was taken. The vehicles all 
rolled for the camera and kept going this time. 
We had headed southwest for five minutes when 
GAZ 11 broke down again. The Benzene Machine 
kept going and we had to follow it in order to keep 

11 Thetrmada stopped at the gher (the nomad's 
felt-and-canvas house, formerly called a yurt) be- 
longing to the somon (district) head man to give 



Polaroids to his family. When we were at Tugru- 
qeen in 1991, he brought the somon wrestling 
Lm to our camp to give us a demonstration^ 
Wrestling is to a Mongolian what baseball is to an 
American This time he invited us in for a bowl of 
^fermented mares milk), but we had to decline 
because the Benzene Machine was stuck, spinning 
,ts wheels in a small sandy gully When Benzena 
finally got out, we resumed our travels to the 
southwest. , . . . 

Several times in the next two hours we had to 
stoo while Ot got out of GAZ II and looked under- 
neath at tie swings, complaining that his truck was 

overloaded. These stops "^T^Z^^er- 
pauses to cool the Benzene Machine the ™datter 
noon stop taking place on the top of a high , ndge ^n 
a violent thunderstorm. There we all were, clustered 
around a leaky tanker with 3 000 Hters o gas me 
while lightning played around our heads. I kept 
thinking about the tall radio antenna on top ot our 
car. The storm passed, the Benzene Machine 
cooled, and we got under way again, unstrucK oy 

^Shortly thereafter the tanker hood flew up while 
Benzena was driving. This happens because he 
props it open with a rock and piece of wire to £eep 
me engine from boiling so often. We haven been 
able to figure out what keeps the rock f rom f. a W 
into the fan. After Benzena rearranged it we tra , 
eled another few minutes before the track plunged 
into a wash filled with apparently bottomless rnua 
The Benzene Machine couldn't possibly get acro» 
so we had to turn around and try it somewhere 

During our next stop for cooling and repairing. 
Malcolm and 1 continued our 1992 Gobi tourna- 
ment, playing six games of gin rummy. By trc si 
the armada got going again a sandstorm had o> 







i m^^^^ ■ — 

Fhe Be^z^e~Machine in its most frequent posture - hood up 



up and we felt like we were traveling into the wild 
brown yonder. This only lasted for 100 yards or so 
when the tanker broke down again. Mike had to 
race after the lead truck. GAZ I. which never not.ces 
what is happening to the rest of us behind. 

6-35 p.m Still stopped Tis said that a heater 
hose is being fixed. There is a lot of sitting around. 
Malcolm and 1 played 15 games of gin rummy. 

Raining again a..— -„ 

800 p.m. Still sitting — no word about camp. 
Hard showers coming by. Had BBC-TV crew over 
for gin and Sunkist and listened to BBC shortwave 
Played six more games of gin rummy. Finally took 
the bull by the homs - got stove out and made 
freeze-dried dinner in hard wind and rain. It tasted 
wonderful - hot and salty and spicy. Used paper 
bowls so only one pot to wash. 

Today: 15 stops and 12 hands of gin rummy; 
a typical Gobi day. 

Sunday. July 19, 1992 

From Artsa Bogd to Bayanlig Somon (Bayanhg 

District) . . , , 

800 a.m. Sixty-six degrees, partly cloudy and 
verv windy. The BBC filmed Mike making Zabar s 
coffee in high wind. Four Mongolian drivers were 
sitting under the hood of the Benzene Machine. 
They took the engine apart overnight in the rain 
using lights powered by a GAZ truck generator We 
broke camp and packed everything except food- 
stuffs and there were still four Mongolians in the 
tanker engine doing something major. After ive 
hands of gin rummy. Malcolm and 1 decided o ex- 
plore the red beds visible to the north against the 
mountains. These turned out to be a "^amorphic 
rock pile - no fossils - but we found a lone elm 
tree and a piece of a dead tree trunk waiting to be 
collected for firewood. , , 

2:05 p.m. Still waiting. Played 20 more hands of 
gin rummy. Banks of clouds complete y obscured 
Artsa Bogd mountains. The Mongols finally got the 
tanker engine back together and -™> r °*' ,e J c '" 
- it started. The armada was just about to pull out 
when it was found that the drain valve pipe at the 
bottom of the tanker was leaking gas. Two hours 
later, after much consultation Benzena chmbed into 
the tank full of gasoline and plugged the hole with a 
wooden fence post. Said post had been sharpened 
to a point with a hatchet and the point wrapped 
with pieces of rotting canvas nailed into the wooer 
It was necessary to repeat this process severaUmes 
until the bung was large enough to stay wedge Unto 
the hole. Benzena hammered it in w. h a steel 1 geol 
ogy hammer while Gasmeister Lowell supervised 
from the top of the tank. After removing the outs.de 
drain pipe from underneath, it was then necessary 
to plug that hole. too. with a large wad of canvas 
torn from a GAZ canopy. 

At 4.00 p.m. they got the Benzene Machine 
started and we moved out. unexploded we were 
able to travel for almost an hour before the tanker 
boiled again. Apparently the radiator hoses leak 
badly and Benzena had to put in six gallon ; of our 
precious water supply. It was 80 degrees and wind 
less, causing this whole operation to be repeated 



three times in the next two hours. The third time 
Benzena took the cap off the radiator too soon and 
it new 20 feet. We wonder what his magic formula 
is. how he survives his accidents unscathed. We had 
time for three more hands of rummy 

On the next stop the tanker got stuck in the sand. 
We waited while Benzena wandered up into the hills 
looking for a replacement for his radiator rock 
which had fallen out. GAZ 11 towed him out with a 
rusty and frayed steel cable. Dunng the next pause 
to cool the tanker we were able to collect a ew 
scraps of dinosaur bone, thus making us feel some- 
what useful. We continued west into a big thunder- 
storm, hoping to find a passable road going south. 
Visibility in the torrential downpour was virtually nil. 

Finally . at 1 1 00 p m we came to Bayanlig 
Somon. a town that was not on our map^ Malcolm 
and I were too tired for tent or dinner and just rolled 
out in our tarp. Mark and Mike cooked for our Mon- 
qolian comrades 

Today: 9 stops and 25 hands of gin rummy. 



Monday, July 20 

From Bayanhg Somon to the Nemegt Uul 
("Mountain Range'") 

820 a m Fifty-six degrees and partly cloudy. By 
some process we don't understand. Mongolia is on 
a kind of double daylight saving time, so sunrise 
isn't until after 7:00 am and sunset after 100U 
p m At 40-45 degrees north latitude, it makes for 
very short mornings and very long evenings 

The armada headed for the mountains. We found 
a road there that goes south across the bottom ot a 
valley filled with gigantic mud puddle. You wouki 
think we were traveling in the Gob. Sea rather than 

the Gobi Desert. . . . 

We stopped to look it over. A variety of Mongo- 
lians arrived on foot and motorbike and a parley 
was held. The BBC jeep went ahead to film the 
Tnmada as it pretended to be a flotilla. Two hours 
later we were all safely across. The Benzene 
Mach.ne. with engine running and wheels spinning, 
had to be towed across by GAZ III. and then of 
course, we had to wait for it to cool. We had come 
one mile in two hours Pretty good! 

NoThaving planned for such a long journey. 

aorj Twas all gone. There was noth.ng left to eat ,n 
ou7car except jerky and beer. We stopped at a 
settlement in hopes of gett.ng water but found mat 
'he area around the shallow well smelled like an 
outhouse, so we passed it up 

From the summit of a low pass, we could see the 
mighty Nemegt Range on the southern horizon and 
ou? track seemed to head straight for a low pbee : m 
he mountain rampart - just where one m.gh ex- 
pec, to find a pass. Maybe we would make it to 
Can Bulak by night after all Our track wound 
down the bottom of a deep canyon with four rea 
elm trees bravely growing in it Half an hourUer 
we came out of the canyon and had to stop the 
S had disappeared Mike drove down the slope 
but coSdn t fiSht We weren't actually lost, we 
knew our exact latitude and longitude from the GPS 



receiver, but we didn't know how to get across the 
mountains 

No tracks were visible anywhere so we had to 
proceed across country down the alluvium and 
across a dry lake, snaking through fields of dzak, the 
ubiquitous Gobi plant. Each plant has a multitude ot 
hard spurs — we call it the flat tire plant We 
headed for a canyon visible to the southwest 
through a landscape that was very rough with gullies 
and big rocks. 

After the next pause to cool the overheated Ben- 
zene Machine. Benzena tool, of! without wanning 
directlv up the slope toward the mountain rampait 
Since we 1 1 luldn I be separated from our gasoline 

iplj we were forced to follow 1 1. roi ■• |hevei 
deepening gullies and ov. 

„l finally be< une so rough that he was forced 
to si and GAZ 1 were cruising around 

farther west, looking for a track through thi mi iun 
vestayedwith Benzena hoping to con- 
tain i hi 1 1 . 
Mike radioed thai they found ' would 
check ii When the Benzene Machine cooled oil 

n usunpLiiined uphill diversion. Benzena 
cranked ii ui .and we had to stop him from lea 
on another solo flight. Where did he think he was 
going? Dashzeveg and Mike were out of sight some- 
where and all the rest of us were there. It baffles 

the mind. 

Our Mongolian companions amused themselves 
by throwing ro< ks Into the dust I vldently the bigger 
the spurt of dusl ilnown up, the bette. th. 
We amused ourselves by drinking Scotch and watei 
on empty stomachs (ou lasl full meal was two days 
ago) and playing another 10 hands of gin mrnmy. 
Whni, .si, l/holsto ' Feltmorecheej 

ful and less worried. The Mongolians had never lost 
their cheerfulness and were never w irrted 
No one knew the state ol F the watei Supply Wi 
were 33 bird miles from Naran Bulak but we W< illld 
ui get there that night. The view north was really 
beautiful — austere, pastel-color. w I dwarfing human 
concerns. A song came Into my mind. "Here we ill 
[ike birds In the wilderness, waiting for Godot 

I think Westerners have lost the ability to wait 
with, mi serious " . elated to the automo- 

bile'' This immense country has an aura of ttmek- 
waiting and seems deeply attuned to the rl lythrn 
of its natural world We don't really tit in partly 
because we have a limited amount ol nmeand 
money to accomplish a great deal of wort rhe n 
crew fit in better than us because their work was to 

filmour waitw..! . , 

An hour later, nol having moved. I iA/ II and iiu 
Benzene Machine l<othha.Hhe.r h...Klsup We got 
tired of gin rummy and read. Finally, the radio mes- 
saqe from Mike came, down went the hoods and 
the armada moved off down the slope The sun was 
low on the horizon. With eight heavy vehicles, we 
made our own road. 

About 9:45 p.m. we decided to camp Jim and 
Lowell made freeze-dried Chicken Polynesian for 
everybody. Our Mongolian companions don t really 
like chicken, hut there hadn I been an opportu. 
for them to buy a sheep, let alone for Chooloona to 
cook it We decided to get up at dawn to look for a 
road, Without troubling with breaklasi I he place 
was too rocky to put up a tent, so we sacked out 

,arp There was a violent storm in the night 
but the tarp kept us dry We discovered that there 
were only 20 gallons of water left for 16 people and 
the tanker radiator We had come 221 miles so far. 
Today 13 stops and 1 1 hands of gin rummy 






Tuesday. July 21 

Across the Nemegt Uul and (finally) to Naran 

VoO a ... s.xtv eight degrees. We were packed 
and waiting lor the others to get ready We hoped 
to find a track over the mountains at the low spot 
we saw a few miles west of here - the logical place 
for it to be. GAZ II had troubl. and I discov- 

ered that the GPS ree. i - - batteries had rundown 
during the nlgW and (even though it was plugged 
into the car power) lost all data, including >5 
recorded waypoints. After that I wrote out all read- 
ings in the road log. Computers are wonderful until 

they stop working. 

We came upon a track heading for the moun- 
tains, but there was a monument there that In 
formed us thai II was washed out We cooked 
breakfast while Mike and Dashzeveg went even 
farther west. Our Mongolian companions passed 

time by throwing pebbles at the tanker and we 
played 10 hands of gin rummy. Our wait was en- 
livened by a visit from a small snake that was en 

continued on page 8 









Gobi, continued from page 7 

ous about this unexpected invasion of its territory by 

eight dusty vehicles , , 

Some two hours later Mike radioed hat they had 
found a track and we all headed west. When we 
turned onto it. 1 made sketches and panoramic pho- 
tos to record where the road enters the mountains 
A tractor with lots of people aboard came north and 
reassured us that the track went all the way across 
and wasn't washed out All we had to do was follow 
,ls tracks Unfortunately, now we would have to 
make the trip across the pass In the hottest part of 
the day, guaranteeing much boiling of radiators, h 
was 87 degrees. , . 

The track ran up the bottom of a wash with the 
von walls getting progressively steeper and 
closer together Benzena had his usual adventures 
mcluding another explosion of his radiator cap and 
many stops for water. After one such stop he 
started off without warning up the canyon on an- 
other of his unplanned diversions. He didn t see the 
i,.h tor tracks turn up a side canyon, nor did he see 
, ,ui wild wavings. so he headed the wrong way and. 
1 .erforce, we had to head the wrong way also^ His 
erratic path ended at an impassable rampart bes.de 

,nd a multitude of sheep and goats At 
this point ( JAZ II broke down, so said Ot. We 
thought thot perhaps he just wanted to stay and 
socialize a bit - he was tired of this journey, as 
were we all. Naran Bulak was a tantalizing 27 bird 
miles away If only we could fly What would Ben- 
zena do if he had wings? 

Retracing our path, we followed the tractor tracks 
up into the heights. While the Benzene Machine 



cooled for the fifth time. Malcolm and . I went up to 
he summit to reconnoiter. We came to an o^ a 
pile of rocks, car parts, goat horns. ^^: C J°^ 
and so on. left by travelers as offerings for a good 
journey) on the top of a hill. We took a ngto .fork 
rom there, which led us to a steep "ill that our 
M.tsu could barely manage It was ^™™ US 
and would have been impossible for the tanker 
Quickly retracing our tracks to the obo we got 
there just in time to wave the Benzene Machine 
onto the other fork. Benzena andChooloona 
passed in the roaring, bounding behemoth with the 
happiest of laughs on their faces. We were glad that 
someone was enjoying this journey. 

After seven hours of trying, we made it to the 
summit of the pass. From there we had a gorgeous 
view of the Nemegt Valley. Malcolm said Thank 
God were out of the woods! (What woods? We 
have seen five trees in the past four days.) But actu- 
ally. 1 felt the same way. 

As we made our way down the south side of the 
mountains, we came upon Mike, who'd stopped, 
concerned about GAZ II. He might have to take an 
empty vehicle and a Mongolian mechanic back to 
the pass and either get GAZ II fixed or bring the TV 
crew's equipment and film down. 

There was much sorting of people and stuff It 
was necessary to turn GAZ III. which carried our 
50-gallon water tank, facing uphill on a slope so 
that we could drain the last drops of water from its 
tanks to feed the insatiable radiator of the Benzene 

Machine. 

Afterward Benzena took off at a high speed 
ahead of the rest of us. We had to overtake him 



because we were afraid that he might pass Naran 
Bulak and roar right on into the trackless and unin- 
habited desert beyond. Fortunately, we soon came 
to a small dry lake where we managed to get in 

front of him. 

At 9:30 p.m., after four wearisome days, we 
arrived at Naran Bulak with no drops of water left 
The flowing spring looked wonderful. All the other 
vehicles except for GAZ II arrived at virtually the 
same time. We relish the end of this improbable 
journey and the prospect of hunting fossils again 
tomon-ow. 

Today: 16 stops and 23 hands of gin njmmy 

Wallowing in water, 

Priscilla 

PS: GAZ II finally came in this morning with a 
happy-looking Ot at the wheel and film intact in the 
rear. The BBC crew was vastly relieved. 

PPS: Benzena has been immobilized by the re- 
moval of the distributor rotor from the engine of the 
Benzene Machine. This is fine with all. The Ben- 
zene Machine has become our own gas station at 
Naran Bulak, and Benzena has put a big blue tarp 
over the broken windshield and taken up residence 
in the front seat. 

Priscilla reports that during the 199Z expedi- 
tion she and Malcolm had time to play the Gobi 
Tournament: 500 hands of gin rummy — a kind 
of "Waiting for Gobi Tournament " Priscilla won 
by two games and her prize was dinner with 
Malcolm at La Cote Basque after their return to 
New York. 



Discovery 

Tours 
Seminars 




125 Years of Discovery 



Dome of the Rock, Jerusalem 



The Amerli an Museum 

member-- to partji I 
pate in a new kind i 'I navel 
ice — seminar trips, 
uvhii h feature Immersion into 
some of the world's richest 
most fascinating cultm 
Four seminar trips are sched- 
uled for the winter and spring 
months o\ 1995; each is 

■ined so that participants 
will learn in depth about one 
particular place or culture. 

From February 22 to 
March 5 a seminar group will 
travel to Bali to study the 
complex culture oi this fabled 
Island. AMNH travelers dis- 
cover Bali's artistic treasures 
by attending festivals and 
workshops and visiting with 
local artisans 

Another seminar trip, from 
Much 3 to 19, will study the 
lifestyles of the Maasai, 
Hadza, Dorobo.and Iraqw 
peoples of Tanzania — their 
relationships with then sui 
roundings and their place in 
the ecology of East Africa. 
Participants will also visit 
Olduvai Gorge, site of several 
famous fossil finds, and see 
the spectacular wildlife of the 



Serengeti Plait 

In May two seminars will be 
offered; Israel, from April 29 
i Ma; 14, and Greece, from 
May 13 to 28. Both these 
countries are rich in archeo- 
logical sites and ancient cities 
that illustrate long and fasci- 
nating histories. In Israel 
AMNH travelers will trace 
human history from the Pale- 
olithic Age to the present 
through lectures, visits to 
major sites and cities, and 
trips into the desert and Dead 
Sea region. In Greece the 
seminar will concentrate on 
the country's history from the 
Bronze Age to the present 
with excursions to famous 
sites and rarely seen spots off 
the beaten track and in the 
heartland of modem Greece 
Prices (per person, double 
occupancy). Bali, $3,395 
(includes air), Tanzania. 
$8,987 (includes air); Israel. 
$5,500; Greece. $4,150 

For more information, call 
Discovery Cruises/Tours at 
(800) 462-8687 or in New 
York State at (212) 769- 
5700, Monday through Fri- 
day, 9:00 a.m to 5.00 p.m. 



The Museum's 125th anniversary 
has inspired three new exhibitions of 
photographs and memorabilia. 

The First 125 Years, in the Hall of 
Birds of the World, is a decade-by- 
decade survey of the Museum's 
growth that is illustrated by 
photographs and specimens. 



People and Places, in the Akeley 
Gallery, is a display of photographs 
taken during Museum expeditions. 

The World Explored: 125 Years of 
Collecting Photographs, in the Library 
Gallery, features highlights from the 
Museum's extensive collections of 
photographs and films. 




Members 9 Birthday Parties at the Museum 



Young Members can cele- 
brate their birthdays in the 
Hall of Meteorites, Minerals, 
and Gems with the new 
theme party The Dynamic 
Earth. They'll take a hands- 
on approach to leam how 
scientists identify minerals, 
precious stones, and mete- 
orites, and they'll go on a 
treasure hunt through the hall 
to discover its geological won- 
ders 

The Membership Office 
sponsors other theme parties 
for Members between the 



ages of 5 and 10 that focus 
on fossil mammals, dinosaurs, 
African mammals, reptiles 
and amphibians, ocean dwel- 
lers, and Native Americans 
In addition to The Dynamic 
Earth, another new theme 
party offers party-goers a 
look at one of the Naturemax 
films — Ye//ouistone or 
Africa. The Serengeti 

The group should be no 
fewer than 10 and no more 
than 20. The fee is $300 plus 
$15 per child and covers all 
materials and the services of a 



Museum party coordinator 
The coordinator will help you 
plan a party that suits your 
child's tastes and will handle 
everything from candles to 
party favors. All you need to 
do is bring the cake and help 
escort the guests. Please note 
that the parties are available 
only to Members at the Con- 
tributor ($100) and higher 

levels. 

For more information 
about the children's birthday 
parties, which are two hours 
long, call (212) 769-5542. 



8 



Naturemax 



The new IMAX film Africa. The Serengeti ex- 
plores the relationships between predator and prey 
by following the great migration of wildebeests 
7 pbras and other animals. Showtimes are 10.30 
and 1130 am and 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. daily. 

Yellowstone takes viewers on a journey to the 
national park to discover its history, geology and 
3EE Showtimes are 12:30 2:30 and 4:30 , i m 

On Friday and Saturday at 6 00 and 7 30 p.m., 
Africa- The Serengeti is shown on a double bill 
with Yellowstone. Schedules and prices .are : subject 
To change without notice. Call (212) 769-565 for 
further information. See page 1 for details of the 
Members' evening at Naturemax 
Admission (Partic.pating and Higher Members) 

Adults $4.75 single feature; $6 double feature 

Children: $2.25 single feature. $325 double 
feature. 



Parking 




The Museums parking lot now offers expanded 
hours and revised rates. The parking lot. which is 
operated in conjunction with the Edison ^Hayden 
Corporation, is open every day from 7:00 a.m. till 
1130pm , 

Rates for cars entering between 7:00 a.m. and 
5 00 p m start at $5 for up to a half-hour and 
advance by stages to a closing-time maximum 
of $17. Cars entering between 5:00 P f m ^ and 
1 1 30 p.m. are charged a minimum of 3»b and a 
maximum of $7 on Sunday through Thursday and a 
maximum of $12 on Friday and Saturday. 

Buses are charged $11 and are not admitted on 

We The n parking lot has a capacity of 100 vehicles 
and is operated on a first-come first-served basis. 
Hertz Manhattan, located one block away from the 
Museum at 210 West 77th Street (between 
Broadway and Amsterdam), offers parking discounts 
to Members: on Monday through Friday Members 
receive a $2 discount off regular prices and on 
Saturday and Sunday they receive a $3 discount 

Call the Membership Office at (212) 769 ooUb 
for information about alternative parking. 



Expedition Calendar 



This 1995 calendar com- 
memorates the 125th an- 
niversary of the American 
Museum. Images and anec- 
dotes from spectacular expe- 
ditions — from the Gobi 
Desert to the North Pole, the 
Congo to the South Pacific — 
are featured, along with color- 
ful and exotic artifacts, origi- 
nal drawings, and rare 
photographs. A special pull- 
out time line highlights the 
Museum's history. 

The calendar measures 
14VT x 10'.-r and costs 
$10.95 each, plus $2 ship- 
ping and handling per calen- 
dar. Use the coupon at right 
to order. 



Expedition Calendar 

Name: 



Address. 

— 



_State: 



.Zip:. 



Daytime telephone: 

Total amount (include sales tax. if applicable):. 

Please make your check payable to the American Mu- 
seum of Natural Histon. and mall with coupon to: AMNH 
Edition Calendar. Central Perk Wesl al 79th Street, 
New York, NY 10024-5192. 



Celebrate 



The Royal Tombs 
of Sipan 

With Peruvian Specialities .it 
the Garden Cafe 

Lunvh. Man tr, 11.30-3:30 



Weekend Brunch, Sal s '<" " ' 
Dinner, Fri s <" 5 7 30 

/,•..,. 1 1 atioru tuggeated 

. aUtheGardenl tf« ."-'- : ''" '•" (,: ' 

I ocated -n ill- I own I • »< I 





Our ch.nn.na little »h.rt ...ture. * bating Ap.to..uru, 
whoic long t.ll wind, .round «o th« b.ck 

i .~A ,.,l„rl .it 100*» cotton toft blur dlno 
M.ndm.de b.tlh on pr*ihrunk .nd colorf.il iuv 

on rich cob.ll b»u« background 

PlUM »P«l»y MToddler), M( » 4) or 1(5 6) 

M*mbrr» Cholc. Collection 

Amrkm Muveum o* N.tur.1 Hl.tory 

C.ntr.l P.rk W«t .t 79th Str^l 

M.W York Mew York 10024 



for 



M.U.rcrd/VU. ord.rv pl~~ «.ll l»Mf »» 



A Global Expedition 

World 
Tour 2 

Saturdays, December 17 
and January 7 
6:30 p.m. 



The V. ilunteer Office*s second 

annu..i World lour will focus 

the Museum's exi Itlng li-ritage 

irld exploratl K/ei the 

,,., .i i ',..,. 'In-- institution 
,,,i repn i ntatlw ■ to i 

| | j .« -tl- .Ik- .jikI the 
World i<>ur will retrace the 
steps of some of the expl< h 

nt.ststoloo- 
that reflect the achievements of 
expedite 
fhe free tour begins In thi 
second-floor Roosev. ill Rotunda. 

111,1 
tours are limited to 35 Individu 
.ill the Volunteer Office at 
(2 1 2) 769-5566 to register 
Tour leader-. Robert Campanile 

Ides: Jenny Gillis 
< rg I efterls, PhilSolle< 



Courses for Stargazers 




Eighteenth-century observatory at Jaipur, India 



ASTRONOMY: 
BASIC COURSES 
Introduction to 
Astronomy 

l ighi 1 1 Uginning 

1 1-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
i] non-Members 
A tirst course in astronomy, 
designed to introduce the 
many interesting aspects of 
the universe to ihose without 
a math or physics 
background. Topics include 
earth as a planet, the moon, 

m, the stars, 
the Milky Way. galaxies, 
quasars, and black holes. 
Common observations such 
as planet motions and the 
using and setting of the sun 
and moon are explained. No 
previous knowledge of astron- 
omy is assumed. This course 
serves as a prerequisite for 
the intermediate-level 
courses, where specific areas 
are covered in more detail. 
Instructor Francine Jackson. 

Stars, Constellations, and 
Legends 

Five Tuesdays, beginning 
Jan. 10; 6:30-8:10 p.m. 
$72 for Members 
$80 for non-Members 

The lore of the sky is intro- 
duced with the Sky Theater's 

projector, which will 
identify the prominent stars, 
constellations, and other sky 
objects of both Northern and 
Southern Hemispheres The 
myths and legends of many 
cultures relating to the sky, as 
well as galaxies, star clusters, 
and nebulae found among the 
constellations, are illustrated. 
No prerequisii, Instructor 
Steven Beyer. 



Life Beyond the Earth: 
The Search for Life in the 
Cosmos 

Eight Mondays, beginning 
Jan 9. 6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 
The reasons that many 
ntists believe there is intel- 
ligent life elsewhere in the 
universe are explored In this 
course. Topics include stellar 
evolution, theories of planet 
formation and development, 
i irlgin ol hi. 1 intelligence, 
problems of cornmunii ltions. 
and current investigations. 
Instructor: Sam Storch. 



Adventures in Astronomy 

Five Saturdays, beginning 
Jan. 14; 9:40-1 1.40 a.m. 
$67.50 for Members 
$75 for non-Members 

Confused about the differ- 
ence between a star and a 
planet? Cant tell astronomy 
from astrology? Don't know 
Aquarius from Sagittarius or a 
black hole from a brown 
dwarf? Join us for a Saturday 
course for the whole family 
(ages 10 and up). In the Sky 
Theater and in labs with as- 
tronomical equipment we will 
explore the birth and death of 
stars, the origin of life in the 
universe, the search for ex- 
traterrestrial life, and the cur- 
rent night sky. The first hour 
meets in the Sky Theater and 
the second hour in Classroom 
1 Instructor: Craig Small. 

Celestial Highlights 

Four selected Mondays: Jan 
23, Feb. 27. March 20, 
April 24. 630-740 p.m. 
$36 for Members 
$40 for non-Members 

This course will focus on 
the interesting and exciting 
events in the skies of the 
coming month. The night sky 
will be accurately simulated by 
the Zeiss projector in the Sky 
Theater, and students will 
learn how to find prominent 
constellations of the season 
and where and when to see 
gatherings of the moon and 
planets The Planetarium's 
extensive collection of special 
effects will illustrate upcoming 
celestial events, including 
meteor showers and eclipses. 
Students will also learn about 
current space missions and 
how to find nebulae, star 
clusters, and galaxies that are 
visible through binoculars or 
small telescopes. Instructors: 
Joe Rao and Henry J. Bartol. 

ASTRONOMY: 

INTERMEDIATE 

COURSES 

From Copernicus to 

Einstein 

Six Wednesdays, beginning 

Jan 11; 6:30-8:40 pm 

$76.50 for Members 

$85 for non-Members 

I Ins survey course exam- 
ines four of the great scien- 
tific ideas that revolutionized 
astronomy and pi i vsics the 
mechanical certainty of 



Copemicus's astronomy; 
Galileo's physics and astron- 
omy; Newton's physics; and 

vin's relativity of time 
and space. Nonmathematical 
presentations of each theory 
will offer historical and 
schematic insight Into 'he 
ways in which these profo 
ideas have affected the dedm 
lion of reality. No formal 
training in physics or math is 
required. Instructor William 
Dorsey. 

Cosmology: The Big 
Picture 

Four Thursdays, beginning 
Jan. 12: 6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$6750 for Members 
$75 for non-Members 

This course will briefly re- 
view the natural history of the 
physical universe, from 
quarks to galaxies, as revealed 
by contemporary astronomy 
and high-energy physics. 
Topics will include the infla- 
tionary Big Bang, elemental 
nucleosynthesis, the three- 
degree background radiation, 
cold dark matter, and the 
future of the cosmos. Discus- 
sions will consider the histori- 
cal and philosophical context 
for modem cosmology along 
with the latest results from 
the COBE satellite and the 
Hubble Space Telescope. 
Instructor Michael Allison. 

The Invisible Universe 

Five Wednesdays, beginning 
Jan. 18; 6:30-810 p.m. 
$72 for Members 
$80 for non-Members 

Beyond what the eye and 
modem optical telescopes 
can see lies a vast invisible 
universe — the universe of 
radio waves, infrared, ultravi- 
olet, X-rays, and more. Using 
giant dish-shaped antennas 
continents apart as well as 
earth-orbiting satellites, 
astronomers are painting 
bizarre and fascinating por- 
traits of planets, stars, and 
galaxies. In this course we'll 
use the latest images available 
to explore the invisible uni- 
verse and see how such views 
complement and enrich our 
vision of the cosmos. Instruc- 
tor William Gutsch. 



METEOROLOGY 
Weather Analysis and 
Prediction 

Six Mondays, beginning 
Jan 9. 6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$76.50 for Members 
$85 for non-Members 

Maps and forecasts similar 
to those seen on television 
and in newspapers are ex- 
plored in this hands-on 
course, in which students 
learn to analyze air masses, 
fronts, and circulations. The 
jet stream, upper atmo- 
sphere, and various means of 
weather prediction will be 
examined, and topics will 
range from modem 
computer-generated forecast 
models to the timeless art of 
reading the sky. No formal 
training in physics or math is 
required. Instructor: Barry 

( ,1, -.Ml I. 11 I 



SCIENCE FICTION 
Science Fiction and 
Contemporary Society 

Four Tuesdays, beginning 
Jan 10; 6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$67 50 for Members 
$75 for non-Members 

How do science fiction's 
imaginative visions reflect our 
own world? What methods do 
authors of fantastic texts use 
to mirror real-world contexts? 
This course will address these 
questions by focusing on 
ence fiction's familiar classic 
writers (Asimov and Clarke), 
the revolutionary creators of 
the New Wave (Delaney and 
LeGuin). and exciting new 
voices (Butler and Tepper). 
Students will explore what 
science fiction has to say 
about social fact. Instructor 
Marleen Banr is a pioneer in 
the study of women and sci- 
ence fiction. A reading list will 
be distributed at the first 
meeting. 



NAVIGATION: 
BASIC COURSE 
Navigation in Coastal 
Waters 

Eight Tuesdays, beginning 
Jan. 10. 6 30-9 00 p.m. 
$99 for Members 
$110 for non-Members 

An introduction to piloting 
and dead reckoning for 
present and prospective own- 
ers of small boats. The course 
provides practical chartwork 
and includes such topics as 
the compass, bearings, fixes, 
buoys and lighthouses, the 
running fix, current vectors 
and tides, and rules of the 
nautical road. Boating safety 
is emphasized. No prerequi- 
sites. Students are required to 
purchase an equipment kit. 
Instructor: Greg Smith. 



NAVIGATION: 
INTERMEDIATE 
COURSES 
Trouble Shooting 
Celestial Navigation 
Four Tuesdays, beginning 
Jan. 10 or Feb. 7. 
6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$67.50 for Members 
$75 for non-Memb' 

This short course is de- 
signed for students who are 
self-taught or otherwise famil- 
iar with techniques for navi- 
gating by the stars but in need 
of some practice. Sessions 
will include a review of the 
basic theory, use of Volume 1 
HO 249. the Rude Star 
Finder and Nautical Almanac 
for pre-calculations of star 
sights, review of star sights, 
moon shots, planet shots, and 
plotting; and use of celestial 
computers, sextants, and 
shooting techniques. No text 
is required; handouts will be 
provided. This course will be 
offered twice each term. In- 
structor: David Berson 

Introduction to Celestial 
Navigation 

Ten Mondays, beginning 
Jan. 9, 6.30-8:40 p.m. 
$99 for Members 
$110 for non-Members 

This intermediate course 
is for those who have com- 
pleted Navigation in Coastal 
Waters or who have equiva- 
lent piloting experience. The 
course covers the theory and 
practice of celestial naviga- 
tion, the sextant and its use. 
and the complete solution for 
a line of position. Problem 
solving and chartwork are 
emphasized. Students are 
required to purchase a copy 
of Sight-Reduction Tables 
for Marine Navigation, Vol- 
ume 3 (Pub. No. 229). In- 
structor: Greg Smith. 



1 

Courses for Stargazers 

I would like to register for the following Planetarium 
courses(s): 



Name of course: 



Price: (Please note that discount prices apply only to 

Participating and Higher Members.) 

Class beginning: 

Name : 



Address: 
City: 



.State: 



.Zip:. 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: 



Please mail this coupon with your check payable to the 
American Museum-Hayden Planetarium to: Courses for 
Stargazers. Hayden Planetarium. Central Park West at 81st 
Street. New York, NY 10024-5192 Registration by mail is 
strongly recommended and is accepted until seven days pre- 
ceding the first class. For additional information, call (212) 
769-5900. Monday-Friday. 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. No credit 
cards accepted. Do not include ticket requests or 
checks for American Museum programs. 



i 



10 



- 



Museum Notes 



Hours u u 

B SEShS*S* 10:00 ,m.-5:45p.m 

Fn°&Sat ..10:00 a.m.-8:45 p.m. 

The Museum Shop 

Mon-Thurs. & Sun 10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

Fn &Sat 10:00 a.m.-7:45 p.m. 

The Junior Shop , nnn „ A r 

Mon -Fri 10:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m. 

sT&Sun 10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

The Museum Library 

' Tues-Fri. 1100 a.m.-400p.m 

The Natural Science Center 

For chi/dren of all ages and their families. 
Closed on Mondays and Holidays ^^^ ^ 

Saf&Sun 100-4:30 p.m. 

The Discovery Room 

Passes are distributed at the first-floor informa- 
tion desk beginning at 11.45 a.m. Ages 5-15. 
Children must be accompanied by an adult 
Closed on holidays and weekdays. 

Sat. & Sun Noon^:30pm. 



Happenings 
at the Hayden 

Eleventh Annual 
Holiday Concert 

A Midwinter Night's Dream 

On Wednesday. December 14. and Thursday 
December 15. at 7:30 p.m.. the world-famous En- 
semble for Early Music returns to the Planetarium s 
Sky Theater for a medieval celebration of the holi- 
day season. Enjoy the music of the royal courts ot 
Europe while the wizardry of the Planetarium s 
special effects transports you through a wonderful 
variety of environments, from castles bathed in 
moonlight to a cozy fireplace at an ancient inn to 
a pine forest under a brilliantly starry sky 

Participating and Higher Members are entitled to 
lour tickets at $18 each. Additional tickets may be 
purchased at the non-Members price of $20 each. 
Use the coupon at right to register, and for further 
information call (212) 769-5900 



Lectures 

Frontiers in Astronomy and 
Astrophysics 

On Monday. December 5. at 7:30 p.m Michio 
Kaku. professor of theoretical physics at the City 
University of New York, will present an illustrated 
talk -Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the 
Tenth Dimension." Kaku will discuss one proposed 
theory that explains all of the forces in the universe 
- time travel, what came before the Big Bang, and 
what is beyond the universe. 

This lecture is part of the Frontiers in Astron- 
omy and Astrophysics series. Tickets are $6 tor 
Participating and Higher Members and $8 for non- 
Members. For information about ticket ava.labil.ty 
and upcoming lectures, call (212) 769-5900. 



Exhibition 



Museum Dining 

Diner Saurus Fast Service Eatery 

Daily U.00a.m.-4:45p.m. 

Garden Cafe 

Reservations: (212) 769-5865 
Lunch: Mon Fri 1 1 30 a.m-3.30 p.m. 

Dinner: Fn. & Sat 5:00-7:30 p IT) 

Brunch: Sat. & Sun ...11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

Whale's Lair 

Fn .V00-8:00 p.m. 

5a, Noon-8:00 p m 

Sun. & most holidays Noon-5 00 p.m 
Snack Carts 

Sat.& Sun 11 <)0a.m.-4:00p.m. 

Entrances 

During Museum hours visitors can enter the 
building through the 77th Street entrance, 
parking lot entrance (81st Street), or the Roo- 
sevelt Memorial Hall entrance (79th Street and 
Central Park West) Visitors attending pro- 
grams after hours can enter the building 
at 79th Street and Central Park West. 



The Universe Revealed: Recent Images 
from the Hubble Space Telescope 

This exhibition features photographs of recent 
discoveries made by the Hubble Space Telescope, 
including the M87 galaxy (which proves the exis- 
tence of black holes) and images of the Shoemaker- 
Levy 9 comet strikes on Jupiter. A »/u scale mode 
of the Space Shuttle Orb.ter deploying the Hubble is 
on display, along with a scale model of the Optical 
Telescope Assembly of the Hubble Space Telescope 
and a 45-minute video of the repair mission oi 
December 1993 



Membership information 

|/oi questions ciboi/l 

jEfiiM m (212)769-5606 

Partn ipating Members' Customer Sen 
(for questions and prob 'ted 

to Rotunda and Nairn. I I Ilstory 
magazine — missed Issu 

pia,,.,' -«2?SS!8 

BE5S5 - B8 : i 

toll-free outside N> 

Naturemax ' " ' "' " 9 - 5650 

KopTen'^blicAri (212)769 

Volunteer Office "S2?£ 

MuseumShop g . ", ' ' 

I ihrani Services (212 " ,|(,() 

Nor (212)769 

Members' Book Program .-.212 769-5500 

Members' Birthday Pa. i..- 0" ' r > 542 



Sky Shows 

Star of Christmas 

Through January 1 

At this holiday program viewers gaze out on a 
clear winter's night and travel back nearly 2,000 
years to explore the skies of the first Christmas. Just 
what led the Wise Men to Bethlehem? Was it a 
special star that no one else had seen before > A 
comet? Or something else? Join us for this special 
holiday tradition. 

Update: The Universe 

New discoveries from space are made on a dalh 
basis, including information about black holes new 
planets, and colliding galaxies. This fast-paced Sky 
Show which uses a "news magazine presentation, 
brings viewers up to date on all the latest astronomi- 
cal discoveries. 

In the past three years telescopes such as the 
Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, the European 
ROSAT and the recently overhauled Hubble bpace 
Telescope have been exploring the universe from 
space At the same time, giant earth-bound tele- 
scopes scan the heavens, searching for signs of 
intelligent life in our galaxy. Update. The Universe 
explores cutting-edge research from the quest for 
extraterrestrial life to studies that peel back time in 
search of the dawn of creation. 

Admission (Participating and Higher Memb*-- 

Adults $4 
Children (2-12): $2 

Call (212) 769-5100 for show schedule and non- 
Members' pnees. Please note that prices are sublet 
to change without prior notice The Hayden Plane 
tarium is closed on Christmas day. 

Children's Shows 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers. Children sing along with images ot 
[heir favonte Sesame Street Muppets as they learn 
about rainbows, the phases of the moon, sunsets, 
and stars Sat . Dec 3, at 10:30 and 1 1 45 , am 
and Sat . Jan 7, at 1030 a.m Admission .for Par 
ncipating and Higher Members is $4 for adults and 
$2 for children. Members can purchase up to four 
tickets at the Members' price. 

Shows usually sell out in advance; reservation 
mail only, are necessary:. Make your check payable 
to the Hayden Planetarium arm Wonderful Sky_ 
Central Park West at 8 1 si street. New York. NY 
10024-5192) indicate membership category ana 
a first and second choice of showtin i< I '•■ a ire to 
include a self -addressed, stamped envelope and your 
daytime telephone number. For additional 
.nformation call (212) 769-5900. 



Robots in Space featw ' ©2 and 

C-3PO-and hash. • 'I >'N» J| > ll|v '"' ' lnl 

drenagc- ' Togeth. , with a live hosl I] 

famousspace <- ; < children on a tour ol 

universe. See how satellites and probes the real 
space rob its - help us learn about wi irlds neat 
and far Journey from the earth toothei plan 
and distant black holes. Sat..)..,, 1 it 11 16 a.m. 
Admission foi Participating and Highei Members is 
$4f<>r.Klultsand$2forcliiid..M. Foi Information 
call (212) 769 .900 



Laser Shows 

Journey into another dimen relasei 

alsandnx I, music combine tocraan adaj fling J-u 

«peM. i.tandsound '"■' , ; , ' 1 ; 1 , ; , ; ( ; 1 

on Fridays and Saturda " ■'"■' |IM,n 

p.m For prices and show schedule telephone 

(212) 769 100. 

It's always a good idea to call before visit- 
inq the Planetarium, since prices, programs, 
and showtimes are subject to change without 
notice. For general Planetarium information, 
call (212) 769-5100. 



Holiday Concert. Please Indicate a Bi I and 

nd choice of times. 
_Wed . Dec I I Thurs., Dec I i 

Numbei ol Membei ft I l8: f^r- 

Numbei ol non-Members Hi kets at $20:_ 
Total amount enclosed for programs 



N.nti. ■ 



i Address: 



! City: 



State 



.Zip:. 



Daytime telephone. 

Membership category: 

Please make check payable to the Hayden 
Planetarium and mail with a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope ... Concert Hayden 
Planetarium Central Pa I al hist Street. 

New York. NY 10024 T> 192. 

Please note that ticket ' to 

availability and cannot be pro "' 

telephone number and ddressed 

envelope Do not include ticket requests or 
checks for American Museum programs. 



11 



»*,• • 




For Participating and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



Vol. 20. No. 2 February I 







Images of Power 

Balinese Paintings Made for 
Gregory Bateson and Margaret Mead 



'A Fight with a Demon in the Rice Fields," 

by I. Reneh, a skilled shadow-puppet maker. 

This 1936 picture portrays a demon biting a 

man's leg while other men attack it with 

farming tools. 



On display in Gallery 77 
from February 3 through May 
Members' Preview: Thursday, 
6:00-9:00 p.m. 

Ill i tie course of their fieldwork in 
Bali during the 1930s anthropologists 
Margaret Mead and Gregory Bateson 
collected hundreds of paintings and 
sketches by local artists. These paint 
ings are strikingly different from tradi- 
tional Balinese art forms and reveal 
much about Bali that was previously 
unknown to Westerners. 

One hundred such paintings will be 
on display at the Museum, and Mem- 
bers can attend a preview of the exhi- 
bition and a related program. 

The Europeans who initiated the 
new art encouraged the Balinese 



February 2, 

artists to paint scenes from their ev- 
eryday life. The Balinese consider the 
visible world only a minor aspect of 
reality, so many of the artists created 
imaginative portrayals of their unseen 
world through images from folk tales, 
myths, and dramas 

Members' Preview 

On Thursday. February 2. Participa- 
ting and Higher Members can attend a 
preview of /mages of Power from 6:00 
to 9:00 p.m. No tickets are necessary 
for the preview, your valid membership 



card will admit you and a gi 
A related Members' program 
md Ami will 

take place on the evening of the pre- 
view. The exhibition scuratoi I III 
Geertz. will describe the person. I 
and events involved In the creation of 
the pictures on display 

Geertz will discuss the ways In 
which young Balinese peasant artists 
learned new painting techniques from 
Western artists living in Bali She'll 
also explore the role that Margaret 
Mead and Gregory Bateson played in 
persuading the painters to allow their 



works to be collected 

A professor of anthrop- 
Prlnceton Un ' "•'•' l/ lr •" l l '" 

eat i In the • - < n . . ■ ■ ■ thi 

paintings were made. She cam*' to 
u some of th. 

111,1 
Bateson. an<* it>e her rela- 

I lips with thi 

ogram will take pi 7:00 

p.m In the Kaufmann Theater I 
are $8 for Members and $12 for non- 
Members. Call the Membership Offt 
at (212) 769-5606 foi Information 
about ticket availabih 




Farmers of the grasslands. 
Hall of African Peoples 



Epic Fragments: 
A Museum Odyssey 

Eight Fridays, starting February 3 

6:30-8:30 p.m. 

Free, and open only to Participating 

and Higher Members 

SOLD OUT from previous issue 



V. -lunteer Highlights Tour 
guide Roberl ( .impanile will 
Members on a 16-houi 
thai will explore the 
.. ,„,, from top i" bottom, 
rhe two-hour tours whl< h 
will lake plat e twi( e a month, 



will run for a total of eight 
evenings starting in February 
and concluding in June 
Members who complete all of 
the tours will be presented 
with a Certificate of Odyssey 
Completion. 



Tours will take place on 
Friday evenings on the follow- 
ing dates: February 3 and 24, 
March 10 and 24. April 7 
and 28. May 19. and June 2. 
Registration is limited to 35 
participants. 



Fire in 
the Snow 

Saturday, 
February 25 
1:30 and 3:30 p.m. 
Kaufmann Theater 
$7 for Members, 
$10 for non-Members 
Ages 5-10 



Eight enet-v nd 

a dynamii percussionist will 
end mbers of all ages 

with theii hi imblna 

Hon mble te< hnique, 

mime and storytellin 
pulax She 
i ill return next month 
vuili ,ui .ill new quart' 
international (< Iktales I 



Kingdom," anadvenhn- 
from Iceland. The Lass Who 
Went Out with the Cry of 
Dawn," an Irish comedy; 
The Fire Bringer." a Native 
Am. rican drama and V'veri 
and Vappu." a comedy from 
I inland 

The Shoestring style is 
minimalist, using only a bare 
stage and a few props and 
relying mostly on then ability 
to excite the audience's imag- 
ination. The actors fill the 
emptj stage with the essence 

,ceans, deserts, 
and mountains while the audi- 
talls li"' 
troupe believes thai a sense 

i ondei Is a1 I 
of being alive ami thai the 
individual mind — child oi 
adull is it-- own universe of 

, oupon on page 3 
to r< 



Members' Subterranean Tour 

The Art of the IRT 

Tuesday, February 7 

600-8:30 p.m. 

£30 oer person, and open only 

to Participating and Higher Members 

Aqes 16 and up 

SOLD OUT from previous issue 



Members can get bet u i 
acquainted with the subway 
system's history and design at 
the Members' Subterranean 
Tour, which will feature an 
exploration of an abandoned 
downtown station 

The tour begins with an 
illustrated lecture at the New 
York Transit Museum on the 
history of the design and 
ornamentation of the city s 
subway stations. Afterward, 
participants will walk to the 
Borough Hall station and take 
the Number 4 or 5 train to 
the Brooklyn Bridge station. 
They'll board a train there 
that will enter the loop of the 



abandoned City Hall station, 
where trains turn around 

Members can linger al the 
old City Hall station, which 
was built in 1904 as the iirst 
of the IRT stations. Designed 
by the architectural firms of 
Heins and LaFarge. it's em- 
bellished in the tum-of-the- 
century style of the City 
Beautiful movement 

The tours will be hosted by 
John Tauranac. an urban and 
architectural historian who 
designed the official map for 
the Transit Authority. He has 
designed many other mi i 
including the subway system's 
first multilingual map. 



Members' Adult-Child Workshop 

From the Heart 

Sunday, February 5 

10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. 

$26 per couple, and open only to 

Participating and Higher Members 

Ages 5 and up 



Create a valentine — or 
dozens — for your nearest and 
dearest friends and family. 
June Myles will show you and 
your child some easy tech- 
niques for the creation of high- 
tech cards that pop up. fold, 
move, and form puzzles. 

Participants will also leam 
some lovely old-fashioned 



methods for valentine making 
that are sure to win a heart or 
two. The valentine pattern 
will include flowers, birds, 
dinosaurs, reptiles, and (of 
course) hearts. 

Use the coupon on pa-, 
to register for the 90-mii 
workshops. Tickets are avail- 
able only by mail. 




The Shoestring Players 



wmok 



ISSN 0194-6110 

Vol. 20. No. 2 
February 1995 

Donna Bell — Editor 

Sheila Greenberg — Manager of Membership Services 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Yolanda Loften — Fulfillment Coordinator 

Robert Jahn — Program Coordinator 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and Higher 
Members of the American Museum of Natural History is 
published monthly September through June, bimonthly July 
August Publication offices are at Natural History magazii j 
American Museum of Natural History. Central Park West at 
Street. New York NY 10024-5192. Telephoi 
5606. Subscriptions: $50 a year for Participating Membersni] 
$100 a year for Contributor Membership. 

>95 American Museum of Natural I list iry Second 

I at New York. NY Postmaste. Please send* 
changes to: Rotunda. Membership Office. American Museum 
Natural History. Central Park West at 79th Street. New YorK. 
NY 10024-51" 2 



Printed by Waldon Press. Inc.. New York 




Whales of Ancient Tethys 

Thursday, February 9 
7:00 p.m. 

^£?lE2Sf$12 for non-Members 



A century ago geologists 
took the name of a Greek sea 
qoddess and bestowed it upon 
an ancient sea that once di- 
vided the earth's great north- 
ern and southern continents. 
Today's Mediterranean is a 
shadow of what Tethys must 
have been. Stretching from 
what is now Spain to Indone- 
sia, Tethys was an ocean 
when trilobites and other 
early forms of life flourished, 
and it lasted more than 500 
million years — through the 
Age of Dinosaurs and into the 



Age of Mammals, until its 
obliteration by the shifting of 
continental plates. 

Three hundred million 
years after vertebrates first 
colonized land, some mam- 
mals reversed their pattern 
and returned to Tethys. 
Today their descendants — 
toothed porpoises and dol- 
phins and the toothed and 
baleen whales that make up 
the order Cetacea — have 
adapted fully to life in water. 
Their advanced cetacean 
features were acquired gradu- 



ally, but the prototype was a 
land mammal living on the 
shores of Tethys 

Paleontologist Philip Gin- 
gerich will discuss his findings 
from the world's most pro- 
ductive whale graveyo 
including the first specimen of 
a whale with functional leg* 
and toes. A professor of geo- 
logical sciences of the Ui. 
sity of Michigan, Gingerich is 
director of the university S 
Museum of Paleontology. 
Use the coupon on this 
page to register. 



Underwater Archeology 

From Projectile Points to Atom Bombs 

Thursday, February 16 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufrnann Theater 

$8 for Members, $12 for non-Members 




Diver-archeologist approaches 
segment of a paddlewheel 




February Members' 
Programs Coupon 



UIT1 Of 

jrk. 



A scientific illustrator sketches 
on an underwater slate 



More than 2.400 Navy and 
other military and civilian 
personnel were killed in the 
infamous 1941 attack on 
Pearl Harbor. Nineteen ships 
sank or were put out of ac- 
tion, including the USS Ai I 
zona. National Park Service 
archeologist Daniel J Leni- 
han. who was asked to survey 
the sunken Arizona, was 
intrigued by the challenge of 
diving in murky waters to 
map a ship three times the 
size of the Statue of Liberty 

Lenihan will talk with Mem- 
bers about his underwater 
experiences at Pearl Harbor 
and other explorations he has 
undertaken as chief of the 
National Park Service s Sub- 
merged Cultural Resour. 
Unit. The unit coi 
diving archeologisis artists, 
and rangers who promote the 
preservation of historic ship- 
wrecks and other underwater 
archeological sites, ranging 
from prehistory to modem 

times. 

In addition to his research 
in Pearl Harbor, Lenihan has 
also completed a survey of 
various ships that were sunk 
at Bikini during the atom 
bomb tests of 1946. including 
the Nagalo. the flagship of 
the Japanese Navy during the 
attack on Pearl Harbor H 
also talk about his explora- 
tions of shipwrecks of the 
Great Lakes. 

Use the coupon on this 
page to register 



NclMU.' 



Address; 



.State: 



.Zip:. 



City: 

Daytime telephone: 

Membership category: — 

| 

I Total amount enclosed: 

| Please make check W aPP"«Wc) payable to tfje \mtrican 
! Museum of Natural Histor and mall in 1th i a self 
! addressed, stamped envelope February M« 

ProgSrnT Membership Offfli ■ [« JJ Museum of 

' NatuVal History, Central Park Wesl ai Nth Streel New 
! York NY 10024-5192. Telephone reservations are not 
! accepted. No refunds or exchanges. 
'• Unless otherwise indicated, no more than eight 
'■ tickets may be ordered for a program. Particl- 
\ pating Members are entitled to four tickets per 
\ program at the Member*' price. Higher Members 
! are entitled to sis tickets, and Associate Member* 
! are entitled to one ticket. 

• Whales of Ancient Tethys 
« Thursday, February 9. 7.00 p.m. 
1 Number of Members' tickets at $8. — 
! Number of additional H< kel at $1 2 — 
! Total amounl em losed for program: — 

• Underwater Archeology 
' Thursday, February 16, 7:00 P m 
I Numbei <>( Members' tli kets at $8: — 
; Number of additional tickets at $12 — 
' Total amount enclosed for program' — 
! Endangered Heritage: Jewish Con. « fftea and Syna 
' gogues in Poland. Thursday. Februari I r00 p.m. 
! Number of Membra Hckel ^*° o — 
! Number of additional ai $12: — 

,tal amount enclosed for program: — 
'. Shoestring Players: Fire in the Snow. Satu- 

iFebmarv"! PleLe Indicate a first and . dcho.ee. 

! _l:30 P m __3:30p.r. 

I Number of Members ticket 

1 Number of additional Ucl 10:_ 

! Total amount enclosed for program: — 

I Clarence S. Bement: The Consummate Collector 

! Wednesday. March 8. 7:00 p.m. 

• Number of Membei 

! Number of additional tickets at $9: — 

! Total amount enclosed fol program: — 

! City Animals: Fact and Myth Saturday, March I I 

! please Indicate a first and second cholo 

li 30 a.m. _l:30p.m. 
! Number of Membei s til kets Bl |5 __ 
J Number of additional ticket _ 

' Total amount enclosed for program: — 

! Charlottes Web ' '" " 

1 Number of Membei g — 

1 Number of additional Uckel _ 

'• Total amount enclosed for program 
1 About the Jews of India: Shanwar Tells 
! or Bene Israel. Wed March 22. 7 00 p HI 

\ Numbei ol Members" tickets at %!■ 
\ Nlll additional tickets al $10 _ 

,tal amount enclosed for program: — 

! Mankiller. Tuesday. M ■7:00 p.m. 

! Number of Membei - 

! Number of additional tli — 

| al amount enclosed for progt am 
! Members Guided Tours of Spiders! I riday, March 31 

>-,;;;::: ! KM— 

{ Number of free Member 

J (no more than 2. please): — 

1 Harass sry«SSg 

! "r by Phone and your check will be returned. 



I 



About the Jews of India: 
Shtnwar Tells or Bene Israel 

Wednesday, March 22 

7:00 p.m. 

tftZSSZ $10 for non-Meiers 



About the Jews of India 
Shanwar Telis or Bene Israel 
portrays the Jewish commu- 
nity of Bombay When the 

film was completed ta u/a. 
foe community numbered 
.,,,.„„ ,,000- one-quarter ot 
Its original size M..M..nhesc 
Indian Jews migrated to Israel. 
n0 1 to avoid persecution but 
onr< [rounds. The 

with which Jews 
ited in India 
them from all 
oth< ra communities. 

ion 
lived in small enclaves In the 
■ii id Bombay. 

WO rl P* ?"' 

aid sellers ol palm oil 
II,,.,, Marathl name, Shan- 
„ | , |i r Saturday oil 
|, indicates thai 
refrained from selling "il on 
,l„. Sabbath Inadditionto 

ping the Sabbath foi 
gr ou|> maintained the Jewish 

u the Dayol At \ 

i si of 

1,,-iing, and Pui in 

,,i marriage 

and divorce in the 1800s, 
when British rule brought 

perity to Bombay many 
\ the Shanwar Telis moved 

lotru dty rheyen mered 

f i the in i time lews from 
, ommunities and as 
they learned Sephardic Jew- 
i,i, ritual theii lives came to 
, ,ni,i,. those "l "'I"' 1 dias 
pora communities theybuill 
synagogues, translated reli 
,,„„, texts into local diale« ts 

larted religious s< I 
andothei institutions. 



Filmmaker Johanna Spec- 
tor will introduce the 40- 
minute film and answer 
questions after its screening. 

Tins program is two hours 
long and the third in a senes 



of Spector's ethnographic 
films. An upcoming feature 
will profile the Jews of 
Yemen. _ 

Use the coupon on page J 
to register for the program 



Grandfather teaching the torah in Bombay 



Matzoh baking from the Bene Israel haggada 



Mankiller: 

A Chief and Her People 



Endangered Heritage 

Jewish Cemeteries 

and Synagogues in Poland 

Thursday, February 23 

7:00 p.m. 

&tSEn*S?Sl2 for non-Members 




Tuesday, March 28 
7:00 pm. 
Main Auditorium 
$18 for Members, 
$25 for non-Members 




Wilma Mankiller 



When Wilma Mankiller was 
10 years old her family lefl 
the Cherokee reservation in 
Oklahoma for a new life in 
San Francisco. Some 20 

later, Mankiller returned 
tohei ancestral home tobe- 

,! chiei "i the 
Cherokee Nation — thv first 
woman elected to this | m isi 
Aon An activist foi American 
Indian causes, Mankiller has 
been Instrumental In raising 
il„. quality ol lif' for her peo- 

i Nexl month she II talk 
with Members about her phi 
losophy of community sell 
help. 

Mankilk-i began working 
for the Cherokee Nation il I 
19 7 upon her return to 
Oklahoma She founded the 
Community Development 
Department and obtained 
is foi many ( heiokee-run 
is and so< ial 
„u hiding several new i linics 
day-care programs, and many 
othei projects She has dou- 
bled revenue, services, and 
employment during the past 




Until World War 11 more 
than 3.5 million Jews lived in 
the towns and villages of 
Poland, making up one-third 
of Warsaw's prewar popula- 
tion and 10 percent of the 
national total. A thousand 
years of Jewish culture gener- 
ated vast numbers of syna- 
gogues, prayer houses, 
schools, ritual baths, markets, 
and cemeteries — many of 
which were wiped out by Nazi 
Germany's Final Solution. 

Since the recent collapse ot 
Communism in Eastern Eu- 
rope and the opening of bor- 
ders throughout the region, 
visitors have found that the 
Nazis failed to obliterate all 
traces of Jewish civilization in 
these areas. Almost every 
major city and countless small 
towns and villages hold surviv- 
ing vestiges of the Jewish 
past albeit ruined and often 
hard to find. These buildings 

have taken on a special signif- 
icance as survivors of the 
once-great civilization of Jew- 



ten years 

The Bell Community pro- 
ji k i which involved the laying 
of a 16-mile water line and 
the rehabilitation of several 
homes, established 
Mankiller's national reputa- 
tion as an expert in commu- 
nity development The project 

model not only for other 
Indian tribes but also for any 
,l community in need of 
development 

The basis of Mankiller's 
philosophy is empowerment 
i .1 the people at the local 
level. She strongly encom 
ages the tribe to become 
mote self-reliant, in addition, 
devotes much of her time 
and energy to promoting 

te and congressional legis- 
lation that protects American 
Indian concerns 

After the 45-minute lecture 
Mankiller will sign copies of 
her book. Mankiller AChle) 
and Her People, which will 
be available for purchase at 
the program. Use the coupon 
on page 3 to register. 



ish Eastern Europe. 

Samuel Gruber is director 
of the Jewish Heritage Coun- 
cil of the World Monuments 
Fund, a private preservation 
organization. Since 1988 the 
Jewish Heritage Council has 
documented, protected, and 
preserved historic Jewish 
around the world. Gruber will 
discuss the council's work 
which includes the restoration 
of Cracow's Tempel Syna- 
gogue. The only nineteenth- 
century synagogue in Poland 
to survive the Holocaust es- 
sentially intact, the Tempel 
was completed in 1862 Al- 
though it was used by Nazis 
as a stable, the buildings 
structure miraculously sur- 
vived, as did its ornate ark 
and rich interior wall and 
ceiling paintings. After its 
restoration, the building will 
once again function as a 
agogue, and it will also host 
cultural events. 

Use the coupon on page 3 
to register. 



Ci 



Sat 

11: 

Kai 

$5 



Members' Day Trip 
to Ellis Island 

Sunday, March 26 
9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. 
$25, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 
Ages 13 and up 



Members can explore our 
country's immigrant heritage 
on a day trip to Ellis Island. 
For more than six decades - 
from 1892 to 1954 — the 
depot processed the greatest 
tide of immigration in the 
nation's history. Some 12 
million people landed at Ellis 
Island, and today their de- 
scendants account for almost 
40 percent of the country's 
population. 

Tour guide Joyce Gold will 
accompany Members on the 
day trip. Gold, who has a 
master's degree in metropoli- 
tan studies from NYU , 

iches popular courses in 
Manhattan history at the New 
School for Social Research 
and NYU She'll meet partici- 
pants downtown at the Peter 
Minuit Plaza at the corner of 
State and Water street 
front of the Staten Island 
ferry terminal. 

The tour will begin in 
Lower Manhattan with a dis- 
cussion of the city's earliest 
immigration. Gold will con- 
tinue her presentation aboard 
the ferry to Ellis Island and 
inside the museum's Great 
I [all. A museum staff member 



will take participants on a 
brief behind-the-scenes tour 
of the building, and there will 
be ample time for individual 
exploration. 

Participants should be sure 
to take a look at the special 
exhibition Becoming Amen 
can Women: Clothing and 
the Jewish Immigrant I 
rience. 1880-1920. Basing 
their research on the assump- 
tion that clothing can more 
effectively evoke the flavor 
and issues of a historical era 
than dry statistics, the 
Chicago Historical Society 
conducted a national search 
for artifacts related to the 
arrival of Jewish women from 
Eastern Europe. 

The exhibition shows that 
often the first step in as 
lating to the new country was 
a change in dress and tl 
adoption of popular fashions 
It addresses topics such as 
work, courtship, and leisure 
as well as intergenerational 
conflicts between mothers 
and daughters. Use the 
coupon on page 5 to regis 
ter. and please note that 
at kets are available only by 
mail 



R«i 



City Animals: Fact and Myth 

Saturday, March 11 

11:30 a.m. and l:JO p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$5 for Members, $8 for non-Members 

Ages 5 and up 




Where have all the gators gone? 



Are there really rats as big 
as cats lurking in the twilight 
of our city streets? Do dis- 
carded baby alligators roam 
the sewer system, attacking 
hapless sanitation workers 9 
Are giant cockroaches invad- 
ing our pantries, and are 
raptors nesting along the 
skvline? 

Meet some of the creatures 
of New York City's urban 
Uklore at City Animals. 
Fact and Myth. Naturalist Bill 
Robinson will introduce live 
wild creatures that make their 
homes in New York City, and 
he'll explain some of their 
larger-than-life stories. 



Feline-size rats that pop out 
of garbage cans are actually 
opossums, the city's only 
resident marsupials. The 
opossum's large gray body 
and hairless tail make it the 
perfect scapegoat for a giant 
rat. Don't worry about its 50 
sharp teeth — the opossum 
would prefer to protect itself 
by playing dead. 

You will also have a face- 
to-face encounter with a large 
alligator, the legendary sewer 
resident. Although alligators 
can live for a short time in 
such an environment, rumors 
of a thriving underground 
alligator community are un- 






ame(s) of program(s): 



Number of tickets and pnee (please indicate which program 
if more than one): 



Total amount enclosed:. 
Name: 



Address. 
City. 



Daytime telephone: 



State: 



-Zip: 



Membership category: 

Please make check payable .o %%"££**%££ 

Natural Hls.o^ and ^^£fj££ii Oto! 
envelope to Tours and WorKsnop*. p kVv , 

Amencin Museum of Natural History. Central Park Wes 
79th Street. New York. NY 10024-5192. 



founded. The 8-foot speci- 
men you'll meet is quite real, 
and a close look into its gai i 
ing mouth of pointy teeth will 
certainly make an impression. 
Peregrine falcons and red- 
tailed hawks are two raptors 
that nest on Manhattan 
skyscrapers. Although they 
normally fly in the sky above 
the Museum, they'll make a 
special indoor flight at the 
program, right over the audi 
ence's heads. Robinson will 
explain how these magmli 
cent birds manage not only to 
survive but also to thrive in an 
urban environment — the city 
actually hosts the world's 
largest nesting concentration 
of endangered falcons 

The waters surrounding 
Manhattan host an unusual 
bird called the com. 
Somewhat prehistoric in ap- 
pearance, the cormorant has 
been noted since antiquity for 
its skill in fishing For cen 
tunes Asian fishermen have 
tamed the birds and fitted 
them with snug collars to 
prevent them from swallow- 
ing their catch Although they 
fish at an average depth of 
25 feet, they have been 
known to submerge more 
than 100 feet in search of a 
catch. They re normally seen 
only from the shores of Man- 
hattan, but at the program, 
Members can see an 
imprinted cormorant on the 
Museum s stage that will 
demonstrate its ability to gob- 
ble down very large fish 

And what about those giant 
roaches? Some exotic species 
have escaped into the city, 
and brave volunteers from the 
audience can confront a giant 
hissing cockroach 

Robinson, who present- 
dramatic wildlife programs to 
thousands of schoolchildi 
each year, has appeared at 
the Museum fort lie pasl 15 
years. Please note thai all 
attendees, parents and i 
dren alike, must have tic! 
the February Members 

programs coupon on page 3 
to regis! 



Clarence S. Bement: 
The Consummate 
Collector 



Wednesday, March 8 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$6 for Members, $9 for 

Minerals have represented 
tl portion ol the 

Museum's ell'' HonS -" ■ 
1874, when the Museum 
acquired its first major colle< 
t„>nfromS.C.H Bailey, a 
lawyer from Oscawanna, New 
York. "IK. " 1 " 1 ! i imen 
Bailey collection 

layed in thi Central Park 
Arsenal Building at b4th 
Street and Fifth Avenu. the 
Museum s temporary home 
from L870to 18 

The nest significanl a< qulsl 
Hon came In 1890 with the 




non-Members 

purchase of i gcolle< 

u,.,, foi $8 000 ( ha 
Spa, n collecting mln 

erals around L833 and! 
,n Nonnan 

(1842 19 12) followed suM In 

L900 i Plerponl Moi 

entedthi m 

mineral i olle< i"" 1 ol 

ClarenceS. Bement. Morgan 

100,000 foi ■!" 
braordinary collei Hon ol 
i ■ 100 specimens, which 
i luded 76 ■ >d500 

mete< >ri 

I ,!-..■ Norman and Charii 
Spang Bemi nt was Involved 
in the iron busin< his firm 
n„. industrial Works manu 
fa< tured mai nine tools f< u 
railroad and shipbuilding In 
dustries I lis astounding col- 
lei Uon was assembled 

n the end ol the I Ivll 
vv . ii and the turn ol the 1 1 n 

tur< ''" 

golden age « >l Ameri in mln 
cral collecting l redi i 
field, a i ontempi 

.nent wh- 
promlnent i ollectoi pral 
the coUe< Hon as me Rni 

die 

Individual 

■ i " 

, nhih assistant In th< Depart 

will 

Im.-'-l 

i highllghl 

from thi 1 1 ""'"■ 

, ollections Use the Febru 

i oupon 

bnite from Japan 



Members' Workshop on 



Reading 
and Interpreting 
Maps and Making 
Topographic Models 

Tuesdays, March 7 and 14 
5:30-7:30 p.m. 
$40, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 



Sidney Hon nstein the 

Museums coordinator of 

,1 publii ■ 
grams, will preseni B 
workshop that shows partici- 
pants how to interpret topo- 
mapsandma 

own topographii mod 

us 

onII 5 of map lntei 

idudeloni 

distance. Members will I 
to leam how to read and 
terpret contour lines <md 



hov. ,|llc " "' '" ' 

,, At the second 

m the ( lass will com lude 

leam the ele- 
ments of constructing l"P" 
I on 

contour lin< 
p „ , | ruld brini 

sors to 1 1 

— allothei n 

the 

coupon at I. 

pi,,, thai i" ketsare 

. hi 






Spring 1994 Education Department Programs 

Evening and Afternoon Lecture Series 




Sacred Deeds: 
Native American 
Land Conservation 

Monday, March 20 

7:00-8.30 p.m 

$1 1 lor Members. $12 for non-Members 

Ronald S McNeil, president of the American 
Indian College Fund will ^peak on issues facing 
Amerii an Indians I le II focus on the Native 

of connection with the earth and 
irdshlp and custodial responsibility as 
opp. the ( oncept of land ownership 

,\ membei of the I lunkpapa band of the Lakota 
Sioux Nation M< Neil is a formei tribal college stu- 
deni and instructor and is president of Standing 
1 1 nk College. 

Toward the 
Arctic Ocean and 
the North Pole 

Four Wedn. ^larch 1-22 

7 .00-8:30 p.m. 

$27 for Members, $30 for non-Members 

Rk hta natural resources and wildlife, the Arctic 



Animal Drawing in the Hall of African Mammals 



holds the promise of wealth and glory. The region s 
population and industrial activity are steadily 
increasing, and its destiny is shaped by its 
formidable climate and terrain, its native peoples, 
and its strategic mantime importance 

This four-part series is presented by Kenneth A 
Chambers, who is an author, a retired Museum 
lecturer in zoology and explorations, and a scholar 
of polar history. 

March 1: Northern Seas and Au 
Explorations A History of Discovery 

March 8; In Search of the Franklin Expedition. 
A haunting mystery of a lost venture. 

March 15: Amundsen and Ellsworth Conquer 
the Arctic. The Northwest Passage and polar 

flights. M „, _ 

March 22: Ringing the Pole: The Northern Sea 
Routes Northeast Passage. Historical perspectives, 
the development of the Russian icebreaker fleet, 
and the Northern Sea Route Project 



Challenges of Gorilla 
Conservation 

Two Thursdays. March 30 and April 6 

7:00-8:30 p 

$18 for Members. $20 for non-Members 

The highly endangered mountain gorillas, which 
are thought to number only 650. live in the rain 



forest ecosystems of Rwanda. Zaire, and Uganda In 
this two-part, slide-illustrated overview. H. Dieter 
Steklis discusses the long-term conservation ol 
mountain gorillas and their habitat. 

Former director of Karisoke Research Centre, 
Steklis led the evacuation of Karisoke when the 
Rwandan war erupted in 1993. He is currently the 
executive director of the Dian Fossey Gorilla hunci 
and a professor of anthropology.al Rutgers Univer- 
sity. 



Geology for Travelers 

Three Tuesdays. March 21 -April 4 

700-8:30 p.m. 

$22.50 for Members. $25 for non-Members 

This three-part, slide-illustrated series introduces 
basic concepts in geology and offers travelers sug- 
gestions about applying these concepts to the 
places they visit. A review and classification o 
major landscapes of the earth and their underi; 
geological structure completes the survey. Oeoiog-* 
Sidney Horenstein. the Museum's coordinator ot 
environmental public programs, will also out ine 
suggestions for obtaining infonnation about tne 
geology of specific areas. 

March 21: Basic Geological Principles 

March 28: Landscape Classified 

April 4: Geological Structures 



Eight Unusual 
Northeastern Indian 

Lives 

Four Mondays. March 27-April 17 

7 30-9:00 p.m. 

$27 for Members, $30 for non-Members 

The names of Tecumseh. Pontiac. King Philip 
and other Indians loom large in American history- 
National Park Service archeologist Robert S. 
Grumet will use maps, illustrations, documents, and 
oral traditions to tell the stories of eight lesser- 
known Indian men and women as chronicled by 
European colonists in and around the Greater New 
York area during the 1600s and 1700s. The pro- 
files of these individuals reflect the range of 

ponses to the problems and opportunities that 
arose through contact with other Indians and Euro- 
pean colonists 

March 27 Indian Diplomats and Warriors m 
New Netherlands and Early New York The ca- 
reers of Hackensack sachem Oratam and Massape- 
qua leader Tackapousha are reviewed and 
interpreted. Both men led their people in uprisings 
against colonists during the 1640s and 1650s ; after 
their failure to drive away the Europeans, they 
struggled to compromise with their increasingly 
powerful and numerous neighbors. 

April 3: Women Leaders. This lecture focuses on 
the careers of two powerful and all-but-forgotten 
women leaders. Mamanuchqua was an influential 
Esopus Indian sachem who lived in the mountainous 
Shawangunk country and led her people during the 
late 1600s, when Dutch, Huguenot, and En S 1 «sh^ 
settlers flooded into Ulster County. New Yorkn^Sr— 
ther north in Massachusetts, the Saconnet squaw 
sachem Awashunkes guided her tribe through the 
difficult years surrounding King Philip's War. which 
was fought from 1675 to 1676. 

April 10: Culture Brokers and Go-Betweens. 
Skilled intermediaries who were conversant in both 
Indian and European languages and customs served 
as go-betweens among the different cultures of the 
colonial Northeast This lecture will examine two ot 
these figures: Suscaneman. a sachem of Long Is- 
land's Matinecock tribe, who signed more than one 
hundred deeds to lands in and around the town of 
Oyster Bay between 1655 and 1700; and Moses 
Tunda Tatamy, a New Jersey-based Delaware In- 
dian who traveled widely through the frontier of the 
eighteenth century as an interpreter, guide, messen- 
ger, and diplomat. 

April 17: Peacemakers and Warriors on the 



Eighteenth-Century Frontier The lives oi 
prominent eighteenth-century Mohawk warrior 
diplomats are the focus of this lecture 1 iv.mogan. 
known to the English as King Hendrik. served Ins 
people as a statesman and warrior for nearly half a 
century. A skillful and wily diplomat, he became the 
friend and confidant of many of the most prominent 
figures of his age. His younger cousin Thyende- 
negea, better known as Joseph Brant, becanv 
brilliant leader of Indian and European troops during 
the Revolutionary War After the wai he led many 
of his people to new homes in Ontario's Six Nation 
Reserve. 



Evenings with the 
Library's Special 
Collections 

Four Tuesdays. March 28-April 18 

7:00-8:30 p.m 

$27 for Members. $30 for non-Members 

The American Museum's library is one of the 
world's great natural history research collection . 
Nina Root, library director, and Joel Swe.mler. 
manager of special collections, will discuss and show 
some of the library's great treasures and rarities. 
Each evening will begin with a brief talk accompa- 
nied by slides or films. Participants will then view 
rarely seen materials from the collections while Root 
and Sweimler discuss the items' history and signifi- 
cance. 

March 28: Rare Books. A history of .< lei u i and 
world exploration is traced by the collectl" m S rare 
and beautiful colored atlases and original watercol- 

April 4: Films. The library has saved and restored 
over 600 natural history films, including a rare 
1915 color Tilm and 1920s footage of Africa. Asm 
and America. Selections will be shown and 
discussed, and one rare film will be shown in Its 

entirety. 

Apnl 1 1 : Photographs. The photo collection 
contains approximately one million images that date 
from 1840 and document now-vanished or altered 
societies, fauna, and landscapes 

April 18 Art. Memorabilia, and Archives. I he 
collection of art and memorabilia com n iore 

than 2.000 items, and the Museum's archives In- 
cludes some eighteenth-century documents This 
presentation will feature paintings and sculptures. 
Teddy Roosevelt's rifle, and letters signed by leg- 
endary figures. 




Mountain Wildflowers 
of the North 

Four Thursdays. March 2-23 

7:00-8:30 pin 

or 

Four Mondays, March 6-27 

2:30-4:00 p m 

$27 for Members. $30 for non-Memh 

Wild areas of coniferous forest, alpine tundra and 
wetlands blanket many ol the mountains ol Ala 
the Pacific Northwest, and Neu I nqlaiul I hen 
flowers Im lude complex on hids colorful Ullcs 
dwarf arctic cree i d ani lertl cushion plai 

These slide Mustrati d le< lures will examine northern 
wildflowers fo< Iheir Identification and 

ecology William Schillei lecture, on botany In the 
Department ol I'ducatioi 

i, i An ,„ I low* ra on theMountaln 
Alaska and the Paatu Northwesi 

Week 2 Neiu England's Arctic Flora M 
lam iop fee Age Relics 

Week 3 Wildflowers of Northern Com 
Forests: Floral Survival Strategies under Sp< 

and Ri _ , 

Week 4: WiUliu- Northern Bogh 

Bog Orchids, Labrador tea. andAssoclcu, 



Special Music and 
Theater Events 

Classical Music and 
Dance of Korea 

Wednesday March 29 
i I0p.m 

Main Auditorium 

$6 for Members, $8 for non-Members 

rh e Museum's Unitv rhrough Dlvei My spring 
,ii begin wltha performance bya ten mem 

ber ensemble of Kon ' "• s ' ,l,, " > 

anddancei lung laeGul a Natl 1 1 Mng fi 

sure The ensemble will i ru lift iltsonlj Nev fork 
appearance ut the Museum where II wlllpresenl a 

range of styles reflecting the cn>v H.....I .. .linen, es 

ofKore.. > history. "Th* " l "' 1 ' 

Chinese court and ritual mush dassii worl h 
Korean Confucianism, royal courl musli and pro 

,,.„,,„ „i„lmUSl( rcrelvpU^I'.utM.I.' -.I I-'- 

A slide-illustrated Introductory lecture..! id (ie.n«»n 

station of Korean musical b ddano 

will be held on Tuesday, March 28. al 7:00 p.m In 

the Kaufman.. I heater. Adim ft >n Is free lor the 

first 300 Individuals Inkling a concert Hi I 



Museum Mystery 
Theater: "The Mask of 
Suspicion" 

I rfday, March 20; Monday April 19; Friday. May 5 

o-8:30 p.m. K . £r% 

$22.50 for Members. $25 for non MeiTWers 

The Education Departmenl In conjuro H< 

Manhattan Rep. < .....p-ny present • .. '•»■- »"."" 
ofdistm and evil IheN 

ofSuspi ■« Museum gallei 

p|o.. .nddilturvol.. lul ult.iU 

: i, west Coast's Bella Mon Indiai 
' An anthropological and historical stud; 

ancient ceremonial mask of the Bella Mon 
dows the wearer with special powers If v< h 
heal.'. II m,.k.s you a better he.. 
warrtoi II makesyoua 

,.akes you more evil 

Sever. .1 Museum emp '" K 

displayed. Coul- 

mo. twilllectur. tl, 

the Bel', • .sksandpe.l some ol 

th. re events. A wine ese recei 

pari ol the Intrigue. ^^ 



Eight Unusual Northeastern Indian Lives 



Workshops, Field Trips, 
and Walking Tours 

Animal Drawing 

,„,!,, fuesdays. March 7-April 25 

7:00-9 00 p.m. 

$105 (no discount for Members) 

Materials no1 Included 

I [mite l to 25 people 

Inln a Museum artist to sketch subjects such as 

as 

5 I: 

«hc rbeg rorexpenenced 

Spring Flowers and 
Trees in Central Park 

Wednesdav April 12; Saturday, April 29; 

and Saturday. May 6 

9 00 i i 00a m 

I united to 25 people 

$7 pei wall mo discount for Members) 

A iwo-hour morning walk in Central Park ob- 

sn.,wberry Fields. Hemshead, and the 

den and watch these areas change 
Sason Tl, ,vll leam about plan, .dent.f.ca- 

;;:^!^,, l | 1 ^. 1 .-AV,ll, 1 , 1 Nhine, lecturer ,n 

,„,,.„„, „, •heDepart....-.H m| Educatjoa 

The walks will start at 72nd Street and Central 
ParkVM 



Spring Bird Walks in 
Central Park 

fuesdays. April 4-May 30: 7 00-9:00 am 

Members) 

L.mited to 25 people 

Observe the spring arrival of birds in Central Park 

seum on the northeast corner of Central ram vv 
fnT?7th Street Pre-registration is required; tickets 
^ be P-chted for individual walks or for either 
series. 

Cape Cod Whale Watch 
Weekend 

SBCftJ^J-w no di5COUnt 

for Members) 
Limited to 45 adults 

This weekend is filled with opportunities to ob- 
serve a^d leam about Cape Cods natural andcul- 
Shistory Trip leaders include Brad Burnham. a 
n'turai See inductor in the &ju^ W 
ment. and Stephen Quinn. naturalist and avid 

t0 Fee P includes transportation, two nights lodging, 
meals, boat cruises, lectures, and adm.ss.on to the 
sanctuary and aquarn u n 



1995 REGISTRATION COUPON 

Please make check payable to the American 
Museum of Natural History and mail with a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope to: Lecture 
c - FHuration Dept . American Museum of 

Street New York. NY 10024-5 19<J. 

Please note that credit-card payment ,s now 
available and that registration will be delayed « 
H^utime phone number or stamped, self- 
addressed envelope is not included^Participating 
and Higher Members can take a 10 percent dis- 
count o'n any program that does not hav< > limited 
enrollment. For further information call (212) 
769-5310 



Name:. 



Address: 
City — 



.State: 



Daytime telephone. 



Membership category: 



Course 

No. tickets 



Day 



Price (each) 



Hour 
Total 



Course 

No. tickets 



Day 



Price (each) 



Hour 
Total 



I Total amounl enclosed: 



Method of payment: — Check . _MC 
Account no.. ■ 



^P iraHondate; -M5rth7iw" 



isa 




Members 9 Birthday Parties 
at the Museum 



Young Members can cele- 
brate their birthdays in the 
Hall of Meteorites. Minerals, 
and Gems with the new theme 
party The Dynamic Earth 
They'll take a hands-on ap- 
proach to leam how scientists 
identify minerals, precious 
stones, and meteorites, and 
they'll go on a treasure hunt 
through the hall to discover its 
geological wonders. 

The Membership Office 
sponsors other theme parties 
for Members between the 
ages of 5 and 10 that focus 
on fossil mammals, dinosaurs, 
African mammals, reptiles 
and amphibians, ocean dwel- 
lers, and Native Americans. 
In addition to The Dynamic 
Earth, another new theme 
party offers party-goers a 



look at one of the Naturemax 
films — Yellowstone or 
Africa. The Serengeti. 

The group should be no 
fewer than 10 and no more 
than 20. The fee is $300 plus 
$15 per child and covers all 
materials and the services of a 
Museum party coordinator 
The coordinator will help you 
plan a party that suits your 
child's tastes and wilLhandle 
everything from candles to 
party favors. All you need to 
do is bring the cake and help 
escort the guests. The parties 
are available only to Members 
at the Contributor ($100) and 

higher levels. 

For more information 
about the children's birthday 
parties, which are two hours 
long, call (212) 769-5542 



Celebrating 
125 Years 



The Sholaga dancers pit 
were photo- 

pU'cl in ik- i":'". Jin ii .a, 
tin- V/emay I aunthorpe Expe- 
ditions in India Se 
pediii.'M photographs from 

und the world ar< 
ploj in the AkeleyGallerj 

oneol 
the spe Lai i xhtbitions that 

urn's 

annlversai 
rsl 125 Years in 
iiu World on 



second floor, offers a decade - 
by-decak survey of the 
Museum s growth and devel- 
opment Exhibits include 

specimens phi itographsand 

is that tell the storv of 
the Museum s . .win -.i d-.v 
when the ground on u I til 1 1 
thebuili uasjusta 

n ,1k Ik n of Central 

tries i 'i Intercon 
nected buildings 
an international center for 



si ientific research. 

In the Library Gallery The 
World Explored 125 Years 
of Collecting Photographs 
features some gems from the 
Museum's extensive collec- 
tions of photographs and 
Rim The library's holdings 
comprise over one million 
images and 3.000 reels \ 
film and represent a valual 
,tik and historical record 
,1-nineteenth cen- 
lun, to I ant 



Eco Impact Forum 



On Wednesday, February 
15. at 6.30 p.m.. lecturer 
Sidney Horenstein presents 
Weathering of Bui/ding 
Stones in the Urban Envi- 
ronment. Horenstein is a 
geologist and coordinator 
of environmental public 
programs at the American 
Museum. 
This free program is part of 



an ongoing series of lectures 
that focus on environmental 
issues of concern to the 
greater metropolitan area. 
No tickets or reservations 
are necessary for the onfi^ 
hour lecture, which will take 
place in the Under Theater. 
For additional information 
about this program call 
(212)769-5750. 



8 



Spiders! 



Fxhibition opens in Gallery 3 on Friday, March 17 
Members- Preview: Thursday. March 16. 4:00-8:00 p.m. 



Spiders spin a spell over 
everyone. Reactions to them 
range from fascination to 
phobia, and spiders appear in 
folklore and legends all 
around the world. The facts 
of spider life are as fantastic 
as fiction, and Spiders! ex- 
plores both 

Visitors will encounter the 
mi. prising beauty of spiders 
their spines, horns, weird 
hairy tufts, and intricate body 
surface designs. The 36.000 
identified species possess a 
glorious gamut of lifestyles 
that have evolved over 400 
million years in habitats rang- 
ing from caves to mountains 
and deserts and even under 
water. Spiders are among our 
foremost allies in the ongoing 
battle against agricultural 

:ct pests, and if they were 
to suddenly disappear, the 
world would be a very differ- 
ent place — and not a better 
place for us. 

Spiders have the same 
problems we do — finding 
shelter, meeting a mate, rais- 
ing offspring, and finding 
food. The exhibition will ex- 
plore their courtship and 
reproductive strategies and 
their techniques for survival. 
Their distinctive practice of 
web-spinning will also be 
explored, with an in-depth 
look at the diversity of web 
architecture and the way that 
webs are carefully designed to 
catch different kinds of prey. 
The Members' preview is 
free and open to Participating 
and Higher Members. No 



tickets are necessary: your 
valid membership card is your 
ticket of admission Spidt 
which was made possible 
through the generous support 
of Marvel Entertainment 



Group. Inc.. was organized by 
the National Museum of Nat- 
ural History, Smithsonian 
Institution, and circulated by 
SITES. The exhibit ion vull be 
on display through June 4 



Spiderania! 

Saturday, March 18 

9:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. 

Ages 5 and up 

$15. and open only to 

Participating and Higher Members 




Members' Guided Tours 
of Spiders! 

Friday, March 31 



A showing of the film Charlottes Web is among the 
atZcUons at the family program Sp.derama! 



You're never really alone 
— there's usually a spider less 
than a few yards away 
They're everywhere, but they 
often go unnoticed, most of 
them are small and secretive, 
and they lead solitary lives. 
At the Members' tours of 
Spiders', participants can 
explore the exhibition in the 
company of Volunteer High 
lights Tour guides The guides 

1 offer facts about the ex- 
hibits, including the difference 
between spiders and 
(and how to tell them apart), 
how spiders see the world 
(imagine having eyes on the 
top of your head), and why 
spiders don't stick to their 
webs (a combination of hop- 
scotch, experience, and toe- 
sucking — really!). 

Use the February Members 
programs coupon on page 3 
to register for the tours 




Lycosa spider with young on its 



Bring the ki. I to gel pider- 

ized on Saturday. March 18. 

wheni eventsre 

latedtoth. i " 1 " 

plat, dll imumu! 

the Museum Use the coupon 
on page 5 t< ' '" 

following actJvltli 



Exhibition Tours 
Beat the rush — th< 

Ify toui ol tl diibltlon 

will be guided througl 1 1 

3 beforr 

i,, foe genera! publli rh< 

which i 
minutes leave from the en- 
nee to Gallery 3 at 8:41 1 

9 00 9 !0 'i" 1 9 10 a.m. 



A Film. Workshop, and a 
Spider Chat 

A film of the children 
das.,, Charlotte's Web will 
, , L0 30 am in 



Kaufmann Chi itei ihe 

him is 94 minutes I | 

Attn the Rim partii Ipai 
lune Myle al a 

crafl 

Idei (ouverut 

takehoi ento " 

loglsl I ou Sorl In will pr< 

pldei 1 1"'' In the 

i in will 

tin ludlng tarantul 

,ui ipldei 

behavlo] and 1 1 

orkshop and thi 

dei chal will la < '"' ''• " ,in " 
uteseach 

i, foi the film " 

,p and it 

illable onl 
1 Highei 
Member '!< ' » ■.»,.! older. 

i upon 

tO' 

$5 foi Members and $8 
non-Memb. ! «'bru- 

ary Members' programs cou- 
pon on page 3. 



From 



the Volunteer Department 



Naturemax 



Expedition: Treasw- 
from 125 Years of Disco* 

ery is an exciting and innova- 

Museum experience. 
Son al v. )lunieer op- 

portunities are still available, 
^nd wed be pleased to wel- 
come you into our Museum 

volunteer Program Call 
Donna Sethi al (212) 769- 
5523 for additional informa- 
tion and an a pi ilia 'Hon. 

Look for Volunteer Ex- 
plainers on the fourth floor in 

the Lila Acheson Wallace 
Wing of Mammals and I heir 
Extinct Relatives. The ex- 
plain. .■. can be identi- 
fied by their blue armband 
and explains 
questions and offer insights 

into the hall. 

hm,. of this year the 

new dinosaur halls will open 
iblii We are looking 
[oi ,, group of dedicated and 
motivated individuals to train 
as explainers In these halls 
You must be prepared to 
thoroughly Immerse yoursell 
mthesubjecl mattei Inaddi 
Hon to formal training classes, 
you must learn additional 
material on your own. Mai 
u ring thi material Is not 
, , „ ,ugh to make one a suc- 
fulexplainei youmusl 
also have the desire and aoll 
llv to share this information 
thepubli( ImparHngthe 
rmation is as important as 

rungH 

\t you are interested m 
Interviewing for an explainei 

posltio the dinosaur halls, 

I ,i. -jse contact Erica Okone at 
(212) 769-5562. Interviews 
will be held m March and 
training will begin in April 




r 



The new IMAX film Africa: 
The Serengeti explores the 
relationships between preda- 
tor and prey by following the 

great migration of wilde- 
beests, zebras, and other 
animals. Showtimes are 
10-30 and 11:30 a.m. and 
130 and 3:30 p.m. daily. 

Yellowstone takes viewers 
on a journey to the national 
park to discover its history, 
geology, and wildlife Show- 
times are 12:30. 2.30. and 
4.30 p.m. 



On Friday and Saturday at 
600 and 7.30 p.m.. Africa 
The Serengeti is shown on a 
double bill with Yellowstone 
Schedules and prices are 
subject to change without 
notice. Call (212) 769-5650 
for further information. 

Admission (Participating and 
Higher Members) 

Adults: $4.75 single fea- 
ture- $6 double feature 

Children: $2.25 single 
feature; $325 double feature 



Parking 



Scenes 



from the 1920s Central Asiatic Expeditions 



Family Adventures 



Once again Discovery 
Cruises and I pleased 

tooffei exciting summer 

I adventures designed for 
children accompanied 
parents ,uid/or grandparents. 
,. family programs i,,w 
uvn carefully developed to 

offei nbination of relax- 

,,,,.i, e periential learnln 
.„„ I, ,i,i door fun. The lecture 
hmenl progr 
,dui ted during these trips 
an d to meet the 

of multi 
generational travelers. 

., L995family 
crui ie Mediterranean 

,yage i(. the Land of Gods 
from lune 

his 

tori( plaa s In Ita 
and rurkey Desiinati. 
inclu. ■ mui. Crete's 

• 1 in. .an town 
acropoli- 
Lindos on Rhodes, and the 
ancient sites ol Ephesus and 

i>ul 

and Athens 

e other family crui 
.mJuly 15 to Wa- 

)lores the magnificent city 
of St. Petersburg and the 




The Museum's parking lot 

now offers expanded hours 

and revised rates. The 
parking lot. which is operated 

in conjunction with the 
Edison Hayden Corporation, 
is open every day from 7:00 
a.m. till 11:30pm 

Rates for cars entenng 
between 7:00 a.m. and 5:00 
p.m. start at $5 for up to a 
half-hour and advance by 
stages to a closing-time 
maximum of $17. Cars 
entering between 5:00 p.m. 
and 11.30 p.m. are charged 
a minimum of $5 and a 
maximum of $7 on Sunday 
through Thursday and a 
maximum of $12 on Friday 
and Saturday. 



Buses are charged $11 
and are not admitted on 
weekends. 

The parking lot has a 
capacity of 100 vehicles and 
is operated on a first-come, 
first-served basis. Hertz 
Manhattan, located one block 
away from the Museum at 
210 West 77th Street 
(between Broadway and 
Amsterdam), offers parking 
discounts to Members: on 
Monday through Friday 
Members receive a $2 
discount off regular prices 
and on Saturday and Sunday 
they receive a $3 discount. 
Call (212) 769-5606 for 
information about alternative 
parking 



Saint Basils Cathedral, Moscow 



capital city of Moscow. These 
two cities are linked by some 
{ t l„ ascinating water- 

ways In the world, and this 
ise will afford the opportu- 
llies to experience 
this land of quaint villages, 
churches with onion-shaped 
domes, palaces, and spectac- 
ular scenery. 
These cruises have been 



planned with special rates to 
encourage families to travel 
together and experience dif- 
ferent cultures and areas of 
the world. For further infor- 
mation, call Discovery 
Cruises Aours at (800) 462 

8687 or in New York State 
(212) 769-5700. Monday 
through Friday, from 9.00 
a.m. until 500 p.m. 



al 



DINOSAURS 
ARE THE LATEST 
THING FOR LUNCH! 

Come try DINER SAURUS, 

a fun-loving, fast service eatery that 
literally glows with neon dinosaurs! 

Featuring our 
MEAL-O-SAURUS 

DINO SIPPERS 

DINO FRIES 

And our latest addition: 
LUCKY NICKEL 
BUFFALO WINGS 

Hours: Ham i 15pm. Won -Sun 

rden C >'' 

DINER s\i hi Sisavailabl< 
foi birthday pai 

pi,-,,,, , -in u i our managei m B74 II II 




DINER, 

SAURUS 




10 



Museum Notes 

Hours 

' m™ -ThSS & Sun 10:00 a .m.-5:4S p.m. 

Fri &Sal ....10:00 a.m.-8:45p.ni 

Th i U Thurs S & P Su, , 1 0:00 am.-5.4S p.m. 

Fri &Sat 10:00 am -745 pm 

Th MVFri 5hOP 1000 a.m.-4:45 p.m. 

&° n &Sun 10 00 am -5 45 pm 

"tiW— 1100a.m.-4:00p.m 

The Natural Science Center 

For children o/ all ages and their /amides. 
Closed on Mondays and doddaes. ^ 

ir&sun. •■:■.:::::. -roo^o,,,, 

The Discovery Room 

Passes are distributed at the first-floor informa- 
tion desk beginning at 11.45 m Ages ; 5-15 
Children must be accompanied by an adult 
C^edonM,l.u '^^^30^ 



Museum Dining 
Di S S a «^^.^00a.m.-4:45p.m 

G SSn^ i r'' , '' i r^^30, m 
»St'A n00 5 a m --I 3 0°Op:m. 



Whale 5 Lair wA 

Ft , .', 00-8:00 pm 

§3, .Noon-8-.OOpn. 

Sun.fc Noon-SOOpm 
Snack Carts 

Sat & Sun 1 1 00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

Entrances 

During Museum hours visitors can entei the 
building through the 77th Street entrance, the 
parking lot entrance (81st Street), or the Roo- 
sevelt Memorial Hall entrance (79th Street and 
Central Park West) Visitors attending pro- 
grams after hours can enter the building 
at 79th Street and Central Park West. 

Phone Numbers 769-5100 

Museum Information uizj /o j oiuu 

Membership ...formation (for questions about 

Musew 0-5606 

Participating Memtx .mer Service 

(for questions and problems related t» ■ ft "»nda 
and Natural History magazine <n^<i 

address changes, and other 9ft ,_ AMNl \ 

information) (800) 2 83 AMNM 

sssi = HIS 

r-*- =w=y«ss 

Volunteer Office.., gl» ,; 

Museum Shop §19176 9 

■212 769-5500 

Natural History magazine 212 7b J jguu 

Members' Book Program. g00 



Expedition: 
125 Years of 
Discovery 



Happenings 
at the Hayden 

Sky Show 

The Ten Most-Asked 
Questions about the 
Universe 

Premieres on February 8 

What is a black hole? Is there * *"*« [* £$ 
universe' Does Planet X exist? Are UrUs real. 
When is the best time to see the Northern Lights 

What is at £^^^KN£ 

universe end' this SKy onuw a 

other frequently asked questions about space. 

Showtime* 1.3O and 3:30 p.m. 

t; 11 00 am. (except for Feb 4 

Sat and March 4). 1:00 2:0a 3:00. 

4.00. and 5:00 p.m. 
c 1 no. ? 00 3 00 4:00. and 5 00 p.m. 

p££ „l °tha,*e« wU. be no Skv Shows 
on Feb. 6 and 7. 

Admission (Participating and Higher Members) 

Adults: $4 
Children (2-12) $2 

Call (212) 769-5100 for additional information 
and non Ambers prices. Please note that prices 
are subject to change without prior notice. 

Lectures 

Frontiers in Astronomy and 
Astrophysics 

On Tuesday. February 21. a. 7 30 P-J^ eth 
Mighell. associate research scientist at Columb.a 
University, will present an illustrated talk. The 
mat.on and Evolution of Dwarf GataXKS 

On Monday. March 13. a. 7:30 P^^JJE 
Gregory, professor of astronomy ^^^ 
of New Mexico, will present an Illustrated tarn. 

■uls in Space. „*i«* in As- 

These lectures are part of th *?" *$ 6 

tronomy and Astropl ■*> J £*» | r | £ 

for Participating and Higher Membere ar^$8to 
non-Members. For information about ticket avail 



ability and upcom.ng lectures, call (212) 769-5900. 
Use the coupon at right to order tickets. 



Exhibition 



The blue whale in Ocean Life is one of 
the 50 treasures highlighted in the new 
self-guided Expedition lours. Visitors can 
come to the base camp in the Hall oj 
Asian Mammals on the se cond floor fa >T 
an orientation session that will send them 
on a treasure hunt around the Museum In 
the manner of a grand expedition. 




The Universe Revealed: Recent Images 
from the Hubble Space Telescope 

This exhibition features photographs of recent 
discoveries made by the Hubble Space Telesc 
including the M87 galaxy (which proves the exis^ 
,,, ,,,,, 1 ,nd .mages of he Shoemaker 

Lew 9 comet stnkes on Jupiter. A 1:15 scale 
model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter deploying the 
Subble is on display, along with a sea e model of 
•he Optical Telescope Assembly of the Hubble 
Space Telescope and a video of the repair mission 
of December 1993. 

* 

Children's Shows 

Wonderful Skj is B q mm lei Sky Show for 
oreschoolers. Children sing al. .ng with .mages of 
E favorite Sesame Street Muppets as they earn 

»»£»^^^ 

A St Ma ch 4 at 1030 a m Ad,— ,n for 
^rt^t^ndHigher Members hi V Ed ■** 
Ld $2 Children. Members can purchase up to 
fr.ur tickets at the Members price. 

Shows usually sell ou. in advance; 'esewat.ons by 
t^f, are necessary. Make your check payable 
roleHayoen PlaneTalm (attn Wonuerlul Sky. 

daylime telephone number For. add.honal 
mation call (212, 769-5900 

Courses for Stargazers 

The Planetarium offers a vanety of courses for 
adults and children in astronomy, meteorology. 



aviation. and ngal Forfurtl 

a catalog of courses call (212) 769 > 

Laser Light Shows 

journey into another dimension ul 

als and rock music coml.n 1. >1 tab ■'■'■ » 

experience of sight and sound ■■ 1;-; ;;;' 

oXdaysandSatunl., sat 7:00 8:30. anc 110:00 
pm For prices and '«P hon8 

(212) '69 5100 

Its always a good idea to call before visit- 
ing the Planetarium, since prices. £»£«"»• 
and showtime* are subject to change rwrthout 
notice. For general Planetarium information, 
call (212) 769-5100. 



Lecture: "The Formation and Evolution of 
Dwarf Galax i«s ' Z1 ' 

7:30 p.m ., 

Numbi'i ol Mi 

more than 4, please) 
Number of non-Members tickets at $8:_ 
total amount enclosed foi program: — 

Lecture: "Voids In Space" 

Number of M- ' * ( ' 

(nomore thanl please) 
Numbei of non-Members tickets at $8. 
Total am I enclosed foi program 



j Name: — 

1 

1 Address: 






1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 





Daytime telephone 

niberehlp 1 .itegory: 



,, L0024 ■ 

ckel orders 

ava 

telephone number 

Do not include ticket requests or 
checks for American Museum programs. 



11 



O' i 

- 







For Participating and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



Vol 20. No 3 M....I. 1' 




Spiny-bellied orb weaver (Micrathena) 



Spiders 



Exhibition opens in Gallery 3 on March 17 
Members' Preview: Thursday, March lb 



Spiders spin a spell over everyone. 
Reactions to them range from fascina- 
tion to phobia, and they appear in 
folklore and legends all around the 
world. The facts of spider life are as 
fantastic as fiction, and Spiders.' ex- 
plores both. 

Visitors will encounter the surpris- 
ing beauty of spiders — their spines, 
horns, weird hairy tufts, and intricate 
body surface designs. The 36,000 
identified species possess a glorious 
gamut of lifestyles that have evolved 
over 400 million years in habitats 
ranging from caves to mountains and 
deserts and even underwater Spiders 
are among our foremost allies in the 
ongoing battle against agricultural 
insect pests, without them the world 
would be a very different place — and 
not a better one. 

Spiders have the same problems we 
do — finding shelter, meeting a mate, 
raising offspring, and finding food. 
The exhibition will explore their 
courtship and reproductive strategies 



and their techniques for survival Their 
distinctive practice of web-spinning 
will also be explored, with an in-depth 
look at the diversity of web architec- 
ture and the way that webs are care- 
fully designed to catch different types 
of prey (See page 4 for a related 
article about commonly encountered 
species of spiders.) 

This exhibition, which was made 
possible through the generous support 
of Marvel Entertainment Group. Inc 
was organized by the National Mu- 
seum of Natural History. Smithsonian 
Institution, and circulated by SITES. 
The exhibition will be on display 
through June 4 

Members' Preview 

On Thursday. March 16. Partici- 
pating and Higher Members can at- 
tend a preview of Spiders' from 4 00 
to 8:00 p.m. No tickets are necessary 
for this free preview, your valid 
membership card is your ticket of 
admission. 



Members' Guided Tours 

Explore the exhibition in the com- 
pany of Volunteer Highligl 
guides, who'll offer fas< Inatlng Insights 
into spider life. The tours will take 
place on Friday. March 31. at 6 00. 
6:30. 7:00, and 7.30 p.m. Use the 
March Members' programs coupon 
on page 3 to register for the tours, 
which are free and open only to Par 
ticipating and Higher Members. 

Spiderama! 

Spend a Saturday at the Museum 
on March 18 at Spiderama! The 
following activities, which are appro- 
priate for ages 5 and up, will take 
place between 840 a.m. and 200 
p.m. Tickets are $l r > and available 
only by mail to Participating and 
I ligher Members. Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register 

Exhibition Tours Guided tours of 
Spiders' will take place at 8:40. 9:00. 
9:20. and 9 40 am The tours. whi< h 



last about 20 minutes, leave from the 
entrance to Gallery 3. 

Charlotte's Web. This delightful 
1,1,, i. based on E.B. White's children's 
,11 I >e shown at 1030 a.m. in 
the K.iulmann I I hi' l''< 

animated film features the voices oi 
Debbie Reynolds. Agnes Moorehead. 
and Paul Lynde and is 94 mini 
long. (Those wishing to see the film 
only can use the coupon on page 
order Ui kets whli h are V> foi Mem 
bers and $8 for non-Membe, 

Older Workshop Join June Myles 
at a craft 

your newly acquired i 'I'l'-i sense to 
make an eight-legged friend to tal 

home. 

Spider Chat. Entomologist Lou 
■ „ „ h, , will talk witli Members about 
spider behavior and ecology In the 
I tnderTheatei I te II show slides 

display live spiders (in. luding 
tarantulas). The crafts works! >• i] i ind 
the spider chat will last for 45 minutes 
each 



About the Jews of India: 
Shanwar Telis or Bene Israel 

Wednesday, March 22 



About the Jews of India. 
Shanwar h ; ■ >r Bene Israel 
portrays the Jewish commu- 
nity of Bombay When the 
him was completed in 1978. 
the community numbered 
about 6 ooo — one-quarter 
ol lis original size. Most of 
the* Indian Jews emigrated 

to Israel, no! to ft d pei 

- i but on religious 

grounds 

The Jews of this region 
lived In small enclaves In the 
villages around Bombay, 
working primarily as produc- 
ers and sellers of palm oil. 
Then Marathi name. Shan- 
w<1 , |,|, (Saturday oil 
pressors), indicates thai they 
refrained from filing oil on 
the Sabbath In addition to 
ping the Sabbath, this 
group maintained the Jewish 



New Year, the Day of Atone- 
ment, Passover, the Feast of 
Ingathering, and Purim as 
well as strict laws of marriage 
and divorce In the 1800s 
when British rule brought 
prosperity to Bombay, many 
,,! i he Shanwar Telis moved 
to the city. They encountered 
for the firs I time lewsfrom 
other communities, and as 
i hi -y learned Sephardic Jew- 
lah i""'' 1 ll "'" lives came to 
resemble those of other dias- 
pora communities. 

Filmmaker Johanna Spec- 
ie will introduce the 40- 
minute film and answer 
questions after its screening. 
This program is two hours 
long and the third in a series 
of Spector s ethnographic 

films. 

The program will take 



Clarence S. Bement: 

The Consummate Collector 

Wednesday, March 8 



In 1900. J. Pierpont 
Morgan, St.. presented the 
Museum With the mineral 
,.,11,., tionol Clarence S. 

..„ ,,i Morgan, who was a 
Museum trustee paid 
$100,000 for tin ordi- 

nary collection of 12,300 



specimens, which included 
769 species and 500 
meteorites. 

Joseph Peters, senior sci- 
entific assistant in the Depart- 
,i of Mineral Sciences, will 
show slides of Bement s finest 
pieces along with highlights 



City Animals: Fact and Myth 



Saturday, March 1 1 



Meet some of the creatures 
ol New York City's urban 
folklore at City Animals 
Fact and Myth Naturalist Bill 
Robinson will introduce live 
wild creatures thai make theii 
homes in New York City, and 
!„ II explain some ol their 
largei than life stories. 

Hisguesi stai include an 
opossum, an eight-foot-long 
alligator, a cormorant, and 




Bene-lsrael wedding: 
The bride 

place at 7:00 p.m in the 
Main Auditorium. Tickets are 
$7 for Members and $10 for 
non-Members. Use the March 
Members' programs coupon 
on page 3 to register. 



from other mineral collec- 
tions. A manufacturer of 
machine tools for railroad 
and shipbuilding industries, 
Bement assembled his as- 
tounding collection during 
the golden age of American 
mineral collecting, the period 
between the end of the 
Civil War and the turn of the 
century. 

The program will take 
place at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Kaufmann Theater Tickets 
are $6 for Members and $9 
for non-Members. Use the 
coupon on page 3 to register. 



that ubiquitous city dweller, 
the cockroach He'll also 
i hsplay a pair of New York 
City raptors, the peregrine 
falcon and the red-tailed 
hawk, who'll fly over the 
heads of the audience. 

Roblnsi 'i who presents his 
dramatic wildlife programs to 
i 1 1. .usands of schoolchildren 
each year, has appeared at 
the Museum for the past 15 



years The program will take 
place at 11:30 a.m. and 
1:30 p.m. in the Kaufmann 
Theater. Tickets are $5 for 
Members and $8 for non- 
Members. The show is appro- 
priate for all ages, and please 
note that all attendees, par- 
ents and children alike, must 
have tickets. Use the March 
Members' programs coupon 
on page 3 to register 



Mankiller: A Chief and Her People 



Tuesday, March 28 

The first woman elected to 
pn • th. i herokee 

Nation. Wllma Mankiller is an 
activist I"' American Indian 

She's been Instrumen- 
tal In raising the quality of life 
!hi people, and she'll talk 
with Members about her phi- 
losophy of community sell 

help 

Mankiller began working 
for the Cherokee Nation In 

H. She founded it 
mm ntv I Vvelopment Depart- 
ed obtained funds for 



many Cherokee-run 

programs and social services. 
iik lading several new dlni 
daycare programs, and many 
other projects. She has dou- 
bled revenue, services, and 
employment in ten y< 

The basis of Mankiller's 
philosophy is empowerment 
of the people at the local 
level. She strongly encour- 
ages the tribe to become 
more self-reliant, in addition, 
she devotes much of her time 
and energy to promoting 



state and congressional legis- 
lation that protects American 
Indian concerns. 

After the 45-minute lec- 
ture Mankiller will sign copies 
of her book, Mankiller. A 

/and Her People, which 
will be available for purchase 
at the program 

The program will take 
place at 7 00 p.m in the 
Main Auditorium. Tickets are 
$18 for Members and $25 
for non-Members Use the 
coupon on page 3 to register 



Members 9 Day Trip 
to Ellis Island 

Sunday, March 26 



Members can explore our 
country's immigrant heritage 
on a day trip to Ellis Island- 
Tour guide Joyce Gold will 
meet Members in Lower 
Manhattan, where she'll dis- 
cuss the city's earliest immi- 
grants. Gold will continue her 
presentation aboard the ferry 
to Ellis Island and inside the 
museum's Great Hall A mu- 
seum staff member will take 
participants on a brief behind- 
the-scenes tour of the build- 
ing, and there will be ample 
time for Members to explore 

on their own. 

Participants should be sure 
to take a look at the special 



exhibition Becoming Amen 
can Women: Clothing and 
the Jewish Immigrant Expe- 
rience. 1880-1920. which 
shows that often the first step 
in assimilating to the new 
country was a change in dress 
and the adoption of popular 
fashions. 

The program will take 
place between 9:30 a.m. and 
3:30 p.m. Tickets are $25 
and available only to Partici- 
pating and Higher Members 
ages 13 and up. 

Use the coupon on page 5 
to register, and please note 
that tickets are available only 
by mail. 



Members' Workshop on 

Reading 

and Interpreting Maps 

and Making 
Topographic Models 

Tuesdays, March 7 and 14 



Sidney Horenstein, the 
Museum's coordinator of 
environmental public pro- 
grams, will present a two-part 
workshop that shows partici- 
pants how to interpret topo- 
graphic maps and make their 
own topographic models. 

The first session will focus 
on the basics of map interpre- 
tation-, topics include longi- 
tude, latitude, scale, and 
distance. Members will begin 
to learn how to read and 
interpret contour lines and 
how to make profiles of ter- 
rain on maps. At the second 



session the class will conclude 
its instruction on interpreting 
contours and learn the ele- 
ments of constructing topo- 
graphic models based on 
contour lines. 

The workshop will take 
place from 5:30 to7 : 30 pn, 
Tickets are $40 and avai! 
only by mail to Participating 
and Higher Members. Partici- 
pants should bring a sharp 
pair of scissors to class — all 
other materials are covered 
by the fee. Use the coupon 
on page 5 to register, tickets 
are available only by mail. 







Vol. 20. No. 3 
March 1995 

Donna Bell — Editor 

Sheila Greenberg — Manager of Membership Services 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Robert Jahn — Program Coordinator 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and Higher 
Members of the American Museum of Natural History is 
published monthly September through June, bimonthly July ai 
August. Publication offices are at Natural History magazm 
American Museum of Natural History. Central Park West at 
Street. New York. NY 10024-5192. Telephone. (212) 7oV- 
5606. Subscriptions: $50 a year for Participating Membersn.p. 
$100 a year for Contributor Membership. 
© 1995 American Museum of Natural History. Second " cla ^ 
postage paid at New York. NY Postmaster: Please send adore 
changes to: Rotunda. Membership Office. American Museum 
Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New YorK. 
NY 10024-5192. 



Printed by Waldon Press. Inc.. New York 




An Evening with Jane Goodall 




• ■-- 



On Tuesday, April 25. 
primatologist Jane 
Goodall will return to 
the American Museum 
to talk about her life 
among the chimpanzees 
at Tanzania's Gombe 
Stream Research Cen- 
tre. Since 1960 Goodall 
has studied the chimps' 
individual and social 
behavior patterns; her 
work represents the 
longest continuous re- 
search project ever con- 
ducted on animals in 
the wild. 

The author of six 
books and the recipient 
of numerous awards. 
Goodall remains one of 
the most renowned and 
respected scientists in 
the world. Her efforts 
not only include protect- 
ing wild chimp popula- 
tions but also improving 
the lives of captive 
chimpanzees. 

The program will take 
place at 7.00 p.m. in the 
Main Auditorium. Tick- 
ets are $22 for Members 
and $30 for non-Mem- 
bers: use the coupon on 
this page to register. 




Members' Museum Tour 

Ages of Rock 

Friday, April 28 

» ^i^^cipating and Higher »*» 



The Indiana limestone of 
the Theodore Roosevelt 
Memorial Hall bears the fos- 
silized remnants of a fantastic 
garden of undersea life — 
creatures that lived 300 mil- 
lion years ago in a shallow 
sea that once stretched across 
the middle of North America 
before the Age of Dinosaurs. 

Sidney Horenstein. the 
Museum's coordinator of 
environmental public pro- 
grams, will lead a fascinating 
walk around the Museum and 



point out the fossils in the 
building's walls and floors. 
More than 60 types of stone 
were used in the different 
stages of the building's con- 
struction, from Portuguese 
limestone with grayish swirls 
of prehistoric shellfish to gray 
marble mottled with the im- 
print of snails that crept 360 
million years ago through a 
now- vanished sea. 

The tours will step outside 
for an overview of the Mu- 
seum's geology, geography, 



and varieties of architectural 
styles. Back inside, they'll 
survey the diversity of stones 
used in the building's con- 
struction and hear about the 
geological history the stones 

reveal. 

Ages of Rock is an encore 
presentation of one of our 
most popular Museum tours, 
and prompt registration is 
advised. Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register, and please 
note that tickets are available 
only by mail 



March Members' 
Programs Coupon 



Name: 



i Address 



City: 



.State 







Zebra Mussels: Alien Invaders 



Wednesday, April 12 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater m u u>r ^ 

$6 for Members, $9 for non-Members 



,-and 
t 79* 
ship; 



ss 

idres& 
:umol 
jrk. 




In the late 1980s a fresh- 
water mollusk known as the 
zebra mussel was introduced 
into Lake St. Clair of the 
Great Lakes region from the 
ballast water of a foreign 
vessel. The zebra mussel has 
flourished in North America, 
spreading throughout fresh- 
water streams and lakes as 
far east as the Hudson River, 
as far south as the Mississippi 
near New Orleans, and as far 



west as Oklahoma. 

No one knows as yet the 
extent of the zebra mussels 
impact on the ecosystem, but 
they could cause major 
changes in the freshwater 
systems where they re found. 
In the meantime, they re 
serious pests that clog intake 
pipes such as those of water 
supply systems and power 
plants, and their presence has 
added millions of dollars to 



the operating costs of many 
of these facilities. 

Sidney Horenstein. the 
Museum's coordinator of 
environmental public pro- 
grams, will use slides to illus 
trate the potential problems 
that zebra mussels represent 
to the ecosystem and the 
methods of control that are 
being studied. 

Use the coupon at nght to 

register. 



Daytime telephone ■ 

(ory: ; 

i 

tal amount enclosed. 

Please make check Of appUcabl. " , ;' 1 A """, 

Museum of Natural History and mai wit ■ 

addressed, stamped envelope to March 
Proa*Zm S ?Membe P rshlp Offio wnd 

' Natural Histor al Park West al 9th Street .Neu 

y ork NY il92 I «-li- phone reservations are not 

accepted. No refunds or exchanges. 

Unless otherwise indicated, no ™ret h ™J. jS* | 
tickets mav be ordered for a program Partici 
patmg Members are entitled to four tickets per 
nroaram at the Members' price. Higher Members 
a7e entitled to six tickets, and Associate Members , 
are entitled to one ticket. • 

i 
Clarence S. Bement: The Consummate Collector 
Wednesday. March 8 I 00 P 
Number of Members tlcki " — 

Number of addition. <l ticket! al >9 — ; 

Total amount enclosed for program: — . 

I City Animals: Fact and Myth. Saturday. March I I J 

I Please indicate a first and second choice. 

; I 1 30 a.m. __J W !""■ ! 

' Number of Members' tickets at J5: 

i Number of addih< mal tickets al >s — 
I Total amount enclosed for program: — 

! Charlottes Web. Saturday March 18 10 I0a.m 

J Number of Members n< kets al $5: — 
' Number of additional it $°: — 

! Total amount enclosed for program __ 

! About the Jews of India: Shanwar Tell* 

1 or Bene Israel. Wednesday, March 22, 7 00 p m 

1 Number of Members tickets al |7:_— 

1 Numberofaddition.il til ki its a I M 1 ' _ 
; Total amount enclosed for program: — 

! Mankiller. Tuesday. March 28 ,7:00 p.m 
! Number of Member . tlcketi &J |1»: — 
[ Number of additional til U*'- — 

; Total amount enclosed for program: — 

! Members' Guided Tours of Spiders M.iv March I 

'iha&^mf^™ 

J Number of free Members' tiM. 
; (no more than 2. please): — 

! Zebra Mussels. Wednesday. April 12, 700 p.m. 

! Number of Members' uckei 
Number of additional tickets at $ J: — 
Total amount enclosed for program: — 

Members' Tours of /mages of Power I rtfey April 

S3=s aft: -- '-— 

Number of free Members' tickets 
(no more than 2, please): — 



An Evening with Jane Goodall 

Tuesday. April 25. 7:00 p.m 
Number of Members U |22._ 

Number of additional tickets at $J0:_ 
Total amount enclosed for program . 



! NOTE Orders received less than ten days before 
j r^« wlU be held ££*-£ *2£ 

i ;r:„ d r„v^;a o9 orvorr b e%dv;« d * «<n 

', ", by phone and your check will be returned. 



Spiders at Home 



Spiders! Stories, legends, and myths abound 
whe^e these creatures are concerned. More than 
36 000 dlffen of sp.ders have been 

described by around the ^.^J 

are probably al I—' as many yet to be discovered 
But how many kinds of spiders are our neighbors 
Occasionally we * rs while cleaning around 

,. house or upon taking a book from an upper 

, , 1 .o we have sp.ders living full ^in« 
homes? Indeed we do Some spiders not only live 
wilh us bul travel with us as well. Let s take a iook 

"Si ^ecomersofroon.^^ 

the work of the ho, * S, *kr. whose ^*™» 

""" Its from a group 
J comb-footed spiders. A house sp.de; r som* 
Hrnes measures over a quartei ^of an inch in length 
bSmaybe, to*p*o ZZ 

in sheltered places. House spiders feed by ^ ght or 

der (in Latin. Steofoda borea/is and S* eat ° do . 
triangulosa). Both are distinctive brownish sp.ders 
w .th M wluK hn, running around the front hal f of 
me abdomen They make a flat, hor.zontal sheet in 

. ; n ,ddle of their tangle webs, and ground-dweH.ng 
snec.es place taul silk lines runn.ng down from the 
.,,.-, ,'he lines have globules of adhesive near the 
bottom and a weak link where the lines actually 

, Ii .1..- ground. When an ant or ^''cockroach 

gets stuck on one of these sticky globules, .t starts to 
struggle to free itself. The line suddenly breatea. 
the weakest point and hoists the msec into .the a r. 
where Its wriggling brings it into contact with more 
alu) fhen the spider wraps the insect in sticky sdk. 
in the comers of the lament, at low levels, and 
m garages, the long-bodied cellar spider, or Pholcus 
phllangioides. makes its web This cosmopolitan 
spider is common in America. Europe, and Asia. 
It's large and pale with legs so long that it s often 
confused with the daddy long-legs, or Op./.ones. 
A house-dwelling spider of the northern hemi- 



by Vladimir Ovtsharenko 
Department of Entomology 



shle. wet oS y a tangle of lines The spider waits 
at the top of the structure in the darkest corner of 

the strands are not caused by prey, t starts to gy 
rafe Us body at great speed while retreating to the 
nnenmosVpart of its silky labyrinth. This startling 
beha^or is presumably an attempt to dislodge or 
SShten the intruder. Cellar spiders have a wide 
anqe of prey, including moths, sow bugs ami other 
P Xs and when the prey gets enUmgted^o^ 
comes bounding along and then rums its back, as 
yTbegin to wonder whether this is a W drejec- 
uon, you see the long legs throwing fine strands 
around the prey until the latter is comptetety 
wrapped up. The package is .gripped I by the claws 
on thespiders back legs and dragged off into the 
depths of the web, where it is devoured 

The biggest webs in the house are made by the 
funnel-web weaver spiders, which usually make 
platform webs with a tube or funnel leading from 
he center or one edge. Another common house 
ptderl the bam spider, or Tegenoria domesUca. 
The biggest of all house spiders (females grow as 
long as"an inch), barn spiders are pale yellow^ 
number of irregular gray spots, and their webs have 
a much larger sheet than those of their domestic 
covins. The sheet is held in place by an extensive 
superstructure of tangled lines that a so function as 
a trap for low-flying or leaping insects, which are 
caught in mid-flight and drop onto the sheet Once 
the insect is exhausted by its struggles the spider 
runs easily across the web and gives the insect a 
Tnomous bite on one of its legs. The spider backs 
off and then repeatedly attacks ^^ x f^, 
gles. Once the poison has begun to take ■ effect .and 
The insects movements have subsided the spider 
grips it in Its -jaws,' pulls it back to the mouth of its 
tube, and begins to enjoy its meal. 

The most peculiar of the house spiders is the 
spitting spider, or Scvtodes thoracica. This hand- 
some spider has a yellowish coat marked with small 
black spots. Its original habitat is under stones, in 
rock fissures, and in deep vegetation in southern 




Europe; today it's found in houses all over Europe, 
and it has even been transported to Amenca and 
Australia, where it has become a domestic spider 

The spitting spider has developed a hunting tech- 
nique not found in any other spider group When its 
prey - usually flies - are sensed at a distance of 
one inch, the spider turns to face them, gives a 
convulsive jerk of its body, and squirts a viscous gum 
from its -jaws." The victim is securely entangled 
and stuck to the surface by the gum, which is aid 
down by the rapidly oscillating "jaws in closely 
spaced parallel bars of ten, twenty, or more The 
spitting and entangling are almost immediate, and 
the spider moves slowly forward to claim its prey. 
The viscous liquid is produced in highly enlarged 
venom glands. Although these glands are used 
mostly for the production of viscous liquid, they do 
produce a quantity of venom, and spitting sp.ders 
Sse this special weapon for both attack and defense 
Now we know six new companions in our homes 
They're not only living with us. they're helping us 
by hunting flies, roaches, and other uninvited 
quests. Don't kill spiders in your house — observe 
them' Spiders' lives are tremendously interesting. 



From the Volunteer Department 



Volunteers Needed 

Expedition Treasures 
scou- 
. well under way and I 
f, „ i„ ith the 
edition volunteers and 
ng public ["here are 
still a fev left foi • 

in ,i, Donna Sethi at 

!) 769-5523 for addi- 
j information 
\\. i an .ilso lookup foi a 
group of dedicated and m 
idMduals to train as 

dinosaui halls The program 
will Include formal training 

i,i ii you inns' learn 
additional mate, i, >l on youi 
own icaOkoneat 

i 2) 769-5562 for an ii 
v In, 1 1 will be held In 
Man will begin 

in April. 

Festival of Life 
Saturday. April 8 
A team of Museum volun 
sen! athi 



chapter overview of life on 
earth. 

These free tours are 90 
minutes long each 

Chaptei 1 In the Begin- 
ning," Hear the story of the 
origin of the universe the 
formation of earth, and the 
processes that led to life as 
we knou 

Chapter 2 Circle of Life." 
Travel our anthropology halls 
to learn how disparate i 
lures view and interpret life. 
Chapter 3: "Basn Instinct. 
How do earth's inhabitants 
reprodu' will conclude 

our story with the challenge 
confronting Homo sapu 
how to preserve and protect 
for ourselves and future 
generations. 

Chapter 1 takes place at 
2:00 p.m.. chapter 2 at 400 
p.m.; and chapter 3 at 6:00 
p.m. Call (212) 769-5566 to 
preregister. 

Tours are limited to 35 
people, priority will be given 



to those who register for all 
three tours. 

Artists and Explorers of 
the American Museum — 
Time Well Spent 

Join a series of explora- 
tions focused on some of the 
personalities who have made 
important contributions to the 
Museum's field research and 
the vast invisible network of 
support behind the scenes. 
Since March is Women's 
History Month, we'll focus on 
Osa Johnson. Mary Dicker- 
son. Margaret Mead, and 
women a lentists at the Mu- 
seum today. 

The first of this series will 
be presented on Friday. 
March 10, at 6 00 p.m. and 
will be repeated on March 25 
at 5:30 p.m. Toms will meet 
at the second-floor Rotunda. 
The tours are free but reser- 

>ns are required; call 
(212)769-5566. Limit 30 
people per tour. 



Educational Forum 

The 
Endangered 

Species Act 

Thursday, April 13 
7:00 p.m. 

What do the peregrine 
falcon, piping plover, and bald 
eagle have in common? They 
are all endangered or threat- 
ened species living within 
New York City. Thanks to the 



federal Endangered Species 
Act, a landmark law, these 
and other species are still with 
us. Learn about why keeping 
the act strong is critical, not 
only for animals and plants 
but also for the health of the 
environment and ourselves. 

The panel discussion will be 
followed by a question-and- 
answer period. This free pro- 
gram, which will take place in 
the Linder Theater, is spon- 
sored by the Endangered 
Species Coalition. Call (212) 
769-5750 for further infor- 
mation. 



Eco Impact Forum 



On Thursday, March 23. at 
6:30 p.m.. lecturer Walter 
Sage presents Environmen- 
tal Impact on Shell Collect- 
ing In the New York Area. 
Sage is a senior scientific 
tent at the American 
Museum 

This free program is part of 
an ongoing series of lectures 
that focus on environmental 
issues of concern to the 
greater metropolitan area No 
tickets or reservations are 
necessary for the one-hour 




lecture, which will take place 
in the Linder Theater. For 
additional information 
about this program 
call (212) 769-5750 



^ w Break Workshops 

A^riTl£-2<T*10:30 a.m.-noon 

$18, and open only to Participating and Higher Members 

Ages 6-9 

By the Power of Their 

Dreams 
Wednesday, April 19 



Its just a few more weeks 
untfl spring. Perhaps Jhc tads 

feel their fancies lightly turn- 
ing to thoughts of bugs - 
and perhaps not. Naturalist 
June Myles will host a senes 
of children's workshops on 
bugs and other themes during 
the week that the small fry 
are on vacation. Use the 
coupon on this page to regis- 
ter and please note that tick- 
ets are available only by mail. 

Ugh! A Bug! 
Tuesday. April 18 

Imagine — for every pound 
of us there are 200 pounds 
of them. Maybe after 
transforming to a 'bug (via a 
mask each of us will make), 
we'll think a little more highly 
of these fascinating creatures. 
We'll learn about their habits, 
where they live, what they 
eat. how they talk, and how 
they get along with each 
other and with us. We'll also 
check out the new Spiders' 
exhibition to discover why a 
ider is not an insect. 



Learn the ways of the 
Plains Indians through their 
medicine shields. The most 
important of a Plains Indian 
warrior's possessions, shields 
were made of buffalo hide. 
Was their use simply a matter 
of physical safety? We'll look 
at the lives of Plains Indians 
and see how shields served 
them. All participants will use 
their own visions to craft a 
protective shield to take 
home. 

125 and Still Counting 
Thursday, April 20 

We'll fast-track through 
125 years of Museum expedi- 
tions and collections by ex- 
ploring the exhibition The 
First 125 Years. Then each 
of us will create a souvenir 
pop-up book to commemo- 
rate some of the highlights of 
the Museum's history. Come 
join the 125th party' 



Members' Adult-Child Workshop 

The Mouse 

in the Matzoh Factory 

Sunday April 9 ^ 

11:00 a.m., 12:30 and 2:00 p.m. 

$16 per couple, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 
Ages 5-8 




Autumn Train Trips 



»• 



April Showers 
Friday, April 21 
6:30-8:00 p.m. 
Ages 16 and older 
$35, and open only 
1 to Participating 
and Higher Members 

Let a smile be your um- 
brella When ii rains II 
pours. After rain comes 
sunshine One already 

wet does not fear the rain. 
However you feel aboul 
rainy days tell 11 to the 
world a1 this workshop 
where you'll design and 
paint an umbrella that says it 
all. We'll provide the urn 
brella and the paints; you 
provide the sentiment. 

Use the coupon on tins 
page to register, and please 
i note that tickets are avail- 
able only by mail. 




The mouse is back! Next 
month he'll make his sixth 
annual appearance at the 
Museum for a special 
Passover program of songs, 
laughter, and matzoh making. 
Author Francine Medoff will 
read her story The Mouse In 
the Matzoh Factory, and 
then each child will help her 
mix the dough for matzoh 

Participants will take I 
dough home with them to 
bake in their own kitchens. 

A former nursery a h 
teacher, Medoff is a woi I 
artist and a part-time ,u In in us 
trator at the Hebrew School 
of Temple Beth Israel in Port 
Washington. New York. The 
program lasts approximately 
45 minutes and is appropri- 
ate for children between the 
ages of 5 and 8. Please note 

that all attendees must have 
i [ ( kets. which are available 
only by mail Members are 
l, ml ted to four tickets ; 
request lo, ,h.s popular show; 
use the coupon on this page 
to regis' 



Members' Cruise 
Long Island Sound 



on 



iSfcfflXi^ff.^"-'- 



Spend a spring afternoon 
speeding along Long Island 
Sound on this Members' 
cruise. Participants will travel 
from the foot of Wall Street 
up the East River, through 
Hell Gate, and beneath the 
Throgs Neck Bridge into the 
sound. They'll view both the 



New York and Connecticut 
Shorelines on the way to New 

Haven Harbor and back. 

Sidney Horenstein. the 

Museum's coordinator ot 

environmental public pro- 
grams, will host the cruise and 

Joint out landmarks along the 
S y . Hell discuss the origms 



of the sound, the geology of 
the shorelines, and the history 
of some of the towns 

Bring a bag lunch; refresh- 
ments are available on board 
Use the coupon at right to 
register, and please note that 

tickets are available only by 
mail 



Discovery Tours has sched- 
uled two private train |oui 

one 
along the ancient Silk Koad 
and one through southern 

Africa. 

From September 2 tl 

18. board in.- PriaN oj A/i 
to experience a safai I through 

[them Africa 
remarkable diversity Its 
rugged mount. hi. 
lush farmland and vasl pla 
waters thundei ep 

go,,. red with rain foi 

est; and tremendous herd' if 

..im the savanna 
From Johannesburg, fly to 
Victoria Falls am 
train to explore Zambezi N.» 
tal Park. Kruger National 
Park, Pretoria, and < 

Is an option for 

Botswana, with stays in 
tented i imps in tl 
vany Delta and Moreml 

Game »' 
From Septembei 11 

il igh 30, travel through 

China and Central Asia on 

two private trains — 1 1. • 
China Orient Express and the 

Russia — to retrace the fabled 



Silk H.m.I fT(iiulinivii.iK'hiii.i 

acre ' lral 

- ol 

Samarkand and Bukh. n.i. 

In Hel- 
ps iru lude XI an the 
the Silk i 
of the ongoing excavation 

oftheEm 

. ; . ■ Buddhlsl 

iguan ■ M 

term 

real Wall; Dunhuang with Its 
,1a, mddunesand 

ii,, Mogao i 

, wiv independent 

both I len 
,, and ramerlane 
■ ices (pei double 

the southern Aft ""' 

$8,990 foi th( Am lenl Sill 
Ro«>.i toui Foi (urthei Intoi 
mation, call Dls. 
Crulses/Toi 

8687 ot In New York State al 
(2i •] 69 i .n. lay 

through Fridai from 9:00 
., ,„ until '.00 p.m. 



1~~ n» T« ne AndWorkshops ' 



thewSo -;,;;: 

o/Rocfcfind aft 

I Ills [Sl 



.„ [^ng fsfand Sound 



■ 



Num ber of ocket. and price (pta. 

gram if more than one): ■ 



t 

! Total amount enclosed: 






_State: 



Address: 

City: 

Daytime telephone: 

Membership category: 

SB =« 

NY 10024 5192. 




Spring 1994 Education Department Programs 

Evening and Afternoon Lecture 

Sacred Deeds: Native 
American Land 
Conservation 

Monday, March 20 

7:00-8:30 p.m. 

$11 for Members. $12 for non-Members 

Ronald S McNeil, a member of the Hunkpapa 
band of the Lakota Sioux Nation and president of 
the American Indian ( olIegeFund, dla usses differ- 
ences in attitudes t< .ward land and private owner- 
ship that are rooted in the Native American sense 
of connection with the earth, stewardship, and cus- 
i. >dlal responsibility. McNeil contends that Native 
American traditional values are particularly relevant 
in addressing some of the problems that beset 
American society 

Toward the 

Arctic Ocean 

and the North Pole 

Four Wednesdays March 1-22 

7:00-8:30 p.m. 

$27 for M. i lib. ''<> lor non-Members 

The An in S harsh ( Innate and terrain have pre- 
ted sever, challenges to explorers. In this four- 
pari ninth A. Chambers describes the 

I triumphs of explorers drawn to the 

An_ Ik regioi ifforts to reach the North Pole or 

to diS4 1 ivei .i northern sea route. Chambers is an 
authoi a lecturer in zoology and explorations, and 
.i scholai "I polar history. 

March 1: Northern Seas and Art in 
I tphratiom A I ii^toru of Discovery 

Hi h 8: In Search oj th< /'ranklin Expedition 
A I hi mting mystery of a lost vent 

larch i i Amundsen and Ellsworth Conquer 
I he Northwest Passage and polar 
flights 

March 22 Ringing the Pole. The Northern Sea 

RouU '$ Northeast Passage. Historical perspectives, 

the development of the Russian icebreaker fleet, 
and the Northern Sea Route Project. 

Challenges of Gorilla 
Conservation 

Two Thursdays, March 30 and April <> 

7:00 

$18 for Members, $20 for non-Members 

The highly endangered mountain gorillas, which 
are thought to number only 650, live in the rain 
forest ecosystems of Rwanda, Zaire, and Uganda 
In this two-part, slide-illustrated overview, H Dieter 
Steklis discusses the long-term conservation of 
mountain gorillas and their habitat. 

Former director of the Karisoke Research Centre, 
Steklis led the evacuation of Karisoke when the 
Rwandan war erupted in 1993. He is currently 
the executive director of the Dian Fossey Gorilla 
Fund and a professor of anthropology at Rutgers 
University 



Geology for Travelers 

I hree Tuesdays, March 21 -April 4 

7:00-8:30 p. n 

$22.50 lot Mrmbers, $25 for non-Members 

rhis three-part, slide-illustrated series introduces 
its In geology and offers travel, 
it it applying these concepts to the 
plaa visit A review and classification of the 

major lai earth and their underlyl 

geol' impletes the survey Geologist 

Sidney HoreiiMi-in. [h. Museum iator of 

en\ Ironmental public programs, will also discuss 

- information about the geolog 
specific an 
March 21 Basic Geological Prlnclpl 
andscape Classification 
April 4: Geologuol Strut lures 



Eight 

Unusual 

Northeastern 

Indian 

Lives 

Four Mondays. March 27-April 17 

7:30-9:00 p.m 

$27 for Members, $30 for non-Members 

National Park Service archeologist Robert S. 
Grumet will use maps, illustrations, documents, 
and oral traditions to tell the stories of eight lesser- 
known Indian men and women as chronicled by 
European cobnists in and around the Greater 
New York area during the 1600s and 1700s The 
profiles of these individuals reflect the range of 
responses to the problems and opportunities that 
arose through contact with other Indians and 
European colonists. 

March 27: Indian Diplomats and Warriors in 
New Netherlands and Early New York. The 
careers of Hackensack sachem Oratam and Massa- 
pequa leader Tackapousha are reviewed and inter- 
preted. Both men led their people in uprisings 
against colonists during the 1640s and 1650s; after 
their failure to drive away the Europeans, they 
struggled to compromise with their increasingly 
powerful and numerous neighbors. 

April 3: Women Leaders This lecture focuses on 
the careers of two powerful and all-but-forgotten 
women leaders. Mamanuchqua was an influential 
Esopus Indian sachem who lived in the mountainous 
Shawangurik country and led her people during the 
late 1600s, when Dutch, Huguenot, and English 
settlers flooded into Ulster County, New York. Far- 
ther north in Massachusetts, the Saconnet squaw 
sachem Awashunkes guided her tribe through the 
difficult years surrounding King Philip's War, which* 
was fought from 1675 to 1676. 

April 10: Culture Brokers and Go-Betweens. 
Skilled intermediaries who were conversant in both 
Indian and European languages and customs served 
as go-betweens among the different cultures of the 
colonial Northeast This lecture will examine two 
of these figures. Suscaneman. a sachem of Long 
Island's Matinecock tribe, who signed more than 
one hundred deeds to lands in and around the town 
of Oyster Bay between 1655 and 1700; and Moses 
Tunda Tatamy. a New Jersey-based Delaware 
Indian who traveled widely through the frontier ol 
the eighteenth century as an interpreter, guide, 
messenger, and diplomat 

April 17: Peacemakers and Warriors on the 
Eighteenth-Century Frontier The lives of two 
prominent eighteenth-century Mohawk warriors and 
diplomats are the focus of this lecture. Tiyanogan, 
known to the English as King Hendrik, served his 
people as a statesman and warrior for nearly half 
a century. A skillful and wily diplomat, he became 
the friend and confidant of many of the most 
prominent figures of his age. His younger cousin 
Thyendenegea, better known as Joseph Brant, 
became a brilliant leader of Indian and European 
troops during the Revolutionary War. After the war. 
he led many of his people to new homes in On- 
tario's Six Nation Reserve. 



Evenings 

with the Library's 

Special Collections 

Four Tuesdays. March 2 8- April 18 
7:00-8:30 p.m 

$27 for Members. $30 for non-Members 

The Amencan Museum's library is one of the 
world's great natural history research collections 
Nina Root, library director, and Joel Sweimler, 
manager of special collections, will discuss and 
show some of the library's great treasures and rarl 
ties. Each evening will begin with a brief talk accom- 
panied by slides or films Participants will then i 
rarely seen materials from the collections while 
Root and Sweimler discuss the items history and 
significance. 

March 28: Rare Books A history of science and 
world explore i> in is traced by the collection's rare 
and beautiful colored atlases and original water- 
colors. 

April 4. Films. The library has saved and restored 
over 600 natural history films, including a rare 
1915 color film and 1920s footage of Afrit a 
Asia, and the Americas. Selections will be shown 
and discussed, and one rare film will be shown in Its 
entirety 

April 1 1 Photographs. The photo collection 
contains approximately one million images that date 
from 1840 and document now-vanished or altered 
societies, fauna, and landscapes. 

April 18: Art. Memorabilia, and Archives. The 
collection of art and memorabilia comprises more 
than 2,000 items, and the Museum's archives In 
eludes some eighteenth-century documents Tins 
presentation will feature paintings and sculptures. 
Teddy Roosevelt's rifle, and letters signed by legen- 
dary figures. 

Mountain Wildflowers 
of the North 

Four Thursdays. March 2-23 

7:00-8:30 p.m. 

or 

Four Mondays, March 6-27 

2:30^:00 p.m. 

$27 for Members. $30 for non-Members 

Wild areas of coniferous forest, alpine tundra, and 
wetlands blanket many of the mountains of Alaska, 
the Pacific Northwest, and New England. Their 
flowers include complex orchids, colorful lilies 
dwarf arctic creepers, and ancient cushion plants 
These slide-illustrated lectures will examine northern 
wildflowers. focusing «»n their identification and 
ecology. William Schiller, lecturer in botany in the 
Department of Education, presents this series. 

Week 1: Arctic Flowers on the Mountains of 
Alaska and the Pacific Northwest 

Week 2: New England's Arctic Flora: Moun- 
taintop Ice Age Relics 

Week 3: Wildflowers of Northern Coniferous 
Forests: Floral Survival Strategies under Spruce 

and Fir 

Week 4. Wildflowers of Northern Boglands 
Bog Orchids, Labrador tea, and Associated Flora 




Geology for Travelers 



Classical Music and Dance of Korea 



Spiders: Lifestyles 

of the Small and Hairy 

Tuesday, Maich 2 1 

7:00-830 p m 

$11 for Members, $12 for non-M. 

There is probablv art least one spider li 
every dwelling in the world. Spidei pent the 

last 380 million years adapting to the poin 
they can live in.uk everywhere on land, and some 
of them dwell in fresh water. 

Simon Pollard, a zoologist from the! ty of 

Canterbury. New Zealand, is a research. . and pho- 
tograph.'! i .1 spiders and insects In this slide illus 

hated talk he'D lead •• toui Into the world ol spiders 
— then - courting styles, family-planni 

strat. id food capture and feeding behavloi i 

This talk Is presented In conjunction with the exhlbl 

tion Spiders 1 whl h ffl itures s c -i Pollard 

photograph 



The Films of David 
MacDougal 

Friday, Man h I] and Saturday. Apnl 1 

7:00-9 00 p.m. 

$18 for Members, $20 for non-Members 

Celebrated documentary filmmaker David Mai 
Douq.il .lis. usses his mi ire than 30 years In ethno 
graphic filmmaking In thti two pari leries I >n each 
evenmq MacDougal will screen one ol his award 

winning works, and the viewings will t« fi illi 
discussions 

I mlay's featured film Is Photo Wallahs (1991; 
60 min ). which portraj India s profe slot 
cameramen rhis him won tin ( iold trd 

at the San I ranciscol llm Festival A W 
H'i 181; 75 min) will be screened oi 

In this film whli h was featured In the M.nq.»ret 
Mead l llm I estlval rurkana women ol northern 

Kei re theii ideas about marriage and 

polygamy. 

Special Music and 
Theater Events 

Classical Music and 
Dance of Korea 

Wednesday. Man I. 29 

7:30 pm 

Main Auditorium 

$6 for Members $8 foi non- Members 

The Museum opens its Unity Through Diversity 
spring series with the only New York appearance of 
, 1 member ensemble of Korea's leading i l.isslcal 
musicians and dancers, including National I ivtng 
Treasure Chung Jae-Guk. The program's U 
range of selections will reflect a 2.000 yeai history 
that ranges from ..,,. lent Chinese court dances and 
ritual mn i. to i lasstcal works from Korean Confu 
danism, royal court mush and processional musl 
rarely performed outside of Korea. 



An Introduction 
to Classical Music 
and Dance of Korea 

Tuesday. M.n- h 

7:00 p.m 

hi Theater 

to cone 

A free slid.' Illustrated I© I demon 

on Korean musli and dam will be held In conjura 

and Dor 

abov. 

r.et 

lese programs are made \ 
generous 1 the Kor< an Mh 

(Seoul) and the Korean Performing At 
tute. Inc. (USA) 



Museum Mystery 
Theater: "The Mask 
of Suspicion" 

Monday. March 20; Wednesday. Apnl 19. 

Friday. May 5 

7:00-8:30 p.m. 

$22.50 for Members. $25 (or non-Members 

The Education Department, in conjunction with 
Manhattan Rep Company, presents a ^sanaUng 
tale i .1 distrust, apprehension, and evil The Mask 
of Suspicion uses a classic Museum gallery to ex- 
plore the traditions and culture of a fictional tnbe. 
the Northwest Coast's Bella Mon Indians. 

Several Museum employees and visitors nave 
had strange accidents in the gallery where an an- 
cient ceremonial mask Is displayed. Could the mask 
be n |tf A famous anthropologist will lecture 

0I1 i he origins of the Bella Mon masks and perhaps 
explain some of these bizarre events A wine-and- 
cheese reception Is part of the intrigue. For infor- 
(212)769-5310. 



Workshops, Field Trips, 
and Walking Tours 

Animal Drawing 

Eight Tuesdays. March 7 -April 25 

7:00 9:00p.m 

$105 (no discount for Members) 

Materials not im luded 

I imlted to 25 people 

Join a Museum artist to sketch subjects such as 
qazellesonth- ,n plains and timber wolves in 

h Aftei the Museum has closed 
l, ,| fts gather to draw animals from 
the famed habitat groups as well as mounted speci- 
[uinn.senioi assistant manager 
in the Exhibition Department, discusses drawing 
fanal anatomy, and the role of the 
arti eum Individual guidance is given to 

h participant, whether beginner or expenenced 

March 7: Hall of African Mammals (second and 
third floors) Introduction 

h 14: 1 lall of Early and Late Fossil Mam- 
1 1 I i stem 
Men ch 21 I lall of Early and Late Fossil Mam- 
maK Must "!,u system 

March 28 I lall of North American Mamm 
Charcoal drawing 

il i 1 1, ,11 ■ il Afrit an Mammals (second and 

third floors) Animal locomotion 

l 1 l lall of Early and Late Fossil Mammals 

i h, ii coal drawing 

American Mammals and Hall ol 

Ocean I i <• coloration 

April 25: North Am, rican Birds Bird anatomy 



Spring Flowers and 
Trees in Central Park 

Wednesday. April 12; Saturday. April 29; 
and Saturday. May 6 
9:00-11;00 a.m. 
Limited to 25 people 
$7 per walk 

A two-hour morning walk in Central Park ob- 
serves botanical signs of spring P^'P 8 "*™ 
Explore Strawberry Fields. Hemshead. and the 
Shakespeare Garden and watch these areas change 
with ^season. They'll learn about plant .dent.f.ca- 
So? i and Sogy from William Schiller, lecturer ,n 
botany in the Department of Education. 

The walks will start at 72nd Street and Central 
Park West. 

Spring Bird Walks 
in Central Park 

Tuesdays April 4-May 30; 7:00-9:00 a.m. 
Ind Thursdays, April 6-June 1. 9 00-1 TOO a.m. 
$7 per walk or $50 for e.ther series (no discount 
for Members) 
Limited to 25 people 

Observe the spring arrival of birds in Central Park 
with naturalists Stephen Quinn (Tuesdays) and 
Harold Feinberg (Thursdays). Leam how to ident.ty 
birds by field marks, habitat, behavior, and song. 
Participants meet across the street from the Mu- 
seum on the northeast comer of Central Park West 
and 77th Street Pre-registrat.on is required, tickets 
may be purchased for individual walks or for the 
series. 

Cape Cod Whale Watch 
Weekend 

Friday-Sunday, May 19-21 

$400 (per person, double occupancy: no discount 

for Members) 

Limited to 45 adults 

This weekend is filled with opportunities to ob- 
serve and learn about Cape Cod's natural and cul- 
tural history. Trip leaders include Brad Burnham, a 
natural science instnictor in the Education Depart- 
ment, and Stephen Quinn, naturalist and avid 

birder. 

The weekend's schedule includes three tour-hour 
whale watch cruises by private charter, a lecture by 
leading whale expert Dr Stormy Mayo, a guided 
birding walk along the trails of Wellfleet Bay Wildlife 
Sanctuary, a stop at Mystic Aquarium, and a chance 
to explore Provincetown or stroll along its beach. 

Fee includes transportation, two nights' lodging, 
meals, boat cruises, lectures, and admission to the 
sanctuary and aquannm 



Special 
John 

Burroughs 
Programs 



John Burroughs 
(1837 L921) was a leading 
literary i ritl< and •> pioneer in 

new school of nati 
writing l"he John Burroughs 
Association, Inc., pre-, 
programs and talks U 
sen associated with 

Burroughs life and maintains 
Slabsides the rusti< • abin 

udied nature and 
wrote some of his essays. 

Annual Meeting and 
Award Ceremony 

The John Burroughs Asso- 
( latlon's annual meeting will 




lake place on Monday. April 
3, from 10:30 to 11:45 a.m 
In the Leonhardt People Cen- 

The meeting will be fol- 
lowed by the annual lunch 
and book award ceremony, 
which will take place from 
noon until 2:00 p m. in the 
Leonhardt People Center. 

The association, which was 
founded and is stiD based at 
the American Museum will 
announce the awards for Its 
sixty-eighth annual literary 
medal award competition for 
optionally fine nature writ- 
ing. Awards will also be an- 
nounced for the sixth annual 



competition for the John 
Burroughs List of Nature 
Books for Young Readers 
and the second annual com- 
petition for an Outstanding 
Published Natural History 
Essay. 



Slabsides Day and 
Centennial Celebration 

Join the friends of the John 
Burroughs Association on 
Saturday. May 20. for the 
centennial celebration 'Slab- 
sides: The First Hundred 
Years." This special event, 
which will begin at noon, is 
presented in honor of the 
cabin's one hundredth 
anniversary. 

Slabsides is located in West 
Park, New York, on the Hud- 
son River, 80 miles north of 
New York City and 1 miles 
south of Kingston For more 
information call (212) 769- 
5169. 



Fall Cape May Birding 
Weekend 

Friday-Sunday, October 20-22 

$350 (per person, double occupancy; no discount 

for Members) 

Limited to 45 adults 

Join Museum naturalists for a weekend of birding 
in one of the world's bird-watching hot spots. Cape 
Mav New Jersey. The trip will include naturalist-led 
walks informal lectures, a stop at the famed Brigan- 
tine National Wildlife Refuge, and two boat trips, 
during which participants will spot seabirds and 
possibly whales and dolphins The fee includes ac- 
commodations, food, and transportation. Tnp lead- 



ers are 



Brad Burnham and Stephen Quinn. 



1995 REGISTRATION COUPON 

i Please make check payable to the American 
1 Museum of Natural History and mail with a self- 
I addressed, stamped envelope to. Lecture 
! Series Education Dept.. American Museum ol 
! Natural History. Central Park West at 79th 
1 Street. New York, NY 10024-5192. 

Please note that credit-card payment is now 
'• available and that registration will be delayed if 
! daytime phone number or stamped, self- 
! addressed envelope is not included. For further 
! information call (212) 769-5310. 



Name: 



Address: 



City-. 



.State: Zip; 



! Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: 



Course 



Day 



Hour 



No. tickets 



Price (each) 



Total 



Course 



Day 



No. tickets 



_Price (each) 



Hour 
Total 



Total amount enclosed:. 



! Method of payment: Check — MC — Visa 



i Account no.: 



Expiration date:. 



Month/Year 




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H 



Children's Workshops 



The following workshops 
are presented by the Depart- 
ment of Education. Use the 
coupon below to register. 
Children should bring a bag 
lunch for workshops lasting 
three hours or longer. If you 
have any questions call (212) 
769-5310. 

Inside Your Body 

Ages 7. 8. and 9 
Sunday. April 2 
10:30 a m.-l 30 pm 

What's underneath your 
skin? In this program children 
listen to their heartbeats, 
examine X-rays, and find out 
what makes their bodies 
work. Presented by Dina 
Cukier Schlesinger. science 
teacher at PS 140. Manhat- 
tan. $25. 

The Big Tree 

Ages 8. 9. and 10 
Saturday. April 8 
10:30 a.m.-l:30 p.m. 

This workshop describes 
some of the trees featured in 
Museum exhibits. The instruc- 
tor will draw trees and explain 
how he created a children's 
book based on a huge sugar 
maple growing in his neigh- 
bor's yard. Children will re- 
ceive help in drawing their 
own pictures of trees, birds, 
and mammals. Presented by 
Bruce Hiscock, author and 
illustrator of The Big Tree 
and other children's books. 
$25. 

Drawing Early Fossil 
Mammals 

Ages 8, 9, and 10 
Sunday, April 2 
10:30 a.m.-l:30 p.m. 

Children leam the rudi- 
ments of drawing with pen 
and ink, watercolor 
techniques, and contour 
drawing. They will study basic 
mammal anatomy and sketch 
in the Hall of Early Fossil 
Mammals. Presented by An- 



gela Tripi-Weiss. art director 
at PS 87. Manhattan. $25. 

Fun with Fossils 

Ages 7. 8. and 9 
Sunday. April 30 
10:30 a.m.-l:30p.m 

This workshop steps back 
in time to show how life de- 
veloped on earth. Children 
discover how fossils are 
found and the ways in which 
fossils offer clues to the past. 
They'll excavate fossils from 
a "dig,'' visit fossil exhibits 
and dig sites, and make their 
own fossils. Presented by 
Anita Steinhart, teacher at 
PS 23. Queens $25 

Undersea Neighbors 

Age 4. each child accompa- 
nied by an adult 
Sunday. May 21 
1030 am -11:30 a.m. 
Using specimens in an 
interactive story, children will 
learn about a variety of ma- 
rine animals. Song, dance, 
and a short film will highlight 
marine animals. A take-home 
art project and visit to the 
Hall of Ocean Life are in- 
cluded. Presented by Dayna 
Reist, former instructor at the 
New York Aquarium for 
Wildlife Conservation. $25 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
Workshops for Young People 

1 would like to register for the following workshop(s) 



Workshop: _ 



Workshop: 



Student's last name; 
Age : Grade : 



First: 



Parent's last name: 



First 



! Daytime phone (area code):. 



J Address; 



City: 



_State: 



Japanese Doll-Making 

Ages 8, 9. and 10 

Sunday, May 7 
10:30 a.m. -1:30 p.m. 

In Japan dolls have their 
own festival. Heirloom dolls 
represent the imperial family 
and samurai protectors. 
Japanese craftsmen also 
make simple wooden dolls, 
paper dolls, and elaborate 
dolls dressed in beautiful 
kimonos. Leam about the 
variety of Japanese dolls and 
make your own to display 
and bring good luck. Pre- 
sented by Karen Kane, senior 
instructor in the Education 
Department. $25. 



Wonderful Whales 

Ages 8 and 9 
Sunday. May 7 
in 10 , in I 50 p.m. 

Whales, the largest animals 
on the planet, live m" 
below the surface of the sea. 
Some approach 100 feet in 
length, weigh more than 140 
tons, and devour eight tons of 
food a day. Children leam 
about the natural history of 
whales and why they are 
hunted using films, songs, 
games, and a visit to the I [all 
of Ocean Life. Presented by 
Merry! Kafka, assistant direc- 
tor of education at the New 
York Aquarium for Wildlife 
Conservation. $25 

Windowsill Garden 

Age 6, each child accompa- 
nied by an adult 
Saturday. May 20 
10:30 a.m. -1230 p.m. 

Start a salad on your win- 
dowsill. Plant lettuce, roots, 
and herbs along with some 
flowers to decorate your table. 
Presented by Uta Gore, senloi 
Museum instructor, and Jay 
Holmes, assistant in science 
for multicultural education. 
Education Department. $25. 

My First Nature Book 

Ages 8 and 9 
Sunday. May 21 
10:30 am -2:30 p.m 

Children create storyboards 
about urban animals and their 
habitats and leam how to bind 
their original accordion books. 
Presented by Bonita Grandal. 
teacher and facilitator for New 
York State Project Wild. $25. 



', Total amount enclosed: 

'; Method of payment D Check D Visa D Mastercard 

i 

i Credit card no. : " 

| Expiration date: Month: . . Ycar \— E7 n ., rate c heck 

; Renter early C^™^™*^^.. 
i 5>^«£ STnot available Jo ; these 
' workshops. Send this coupon With your ^ heck o mo ^ 
order payable to the American Museum oL Natural Mu, ry 
and a's'elf-addressed. -^^^Tofffi^. 
Workshops for Young People Department o 
American Museum of Natural H.story 79 Street 
Central Park West. New York. NY 10024-51 W. 



Learning to Draw through 
Movement 

Age 5. each child accompa- 
nied by an adult 
One Sunday. April 23 or 30 

or May 7 
10:30a.m-noon 

Children will leam to ex- 
press animal movement 
through dance and drawing 
dunng visits to the halls of 
Ocean Life. African Mam- 
mals, and Asian Peoples. 
Presented by Judith Levy, 
who has taught at the 
Carnegie Museum of Art. and 
Patrizia Tombesi. a profes- 
sional dancer and movement 
specialist. $25 

Creating a Children's 
Book: Animals and Their 
Habitats 

Ages 10 and 11 each child 

accompanied by an adult 
Four Saturdays. April 22. 29, 

May 6 and 20 

10:30 a.m.-l:30 p.m. 

Children will examine ani- 
mals and their habital 
some of the Museum's diora- 
mas to prepare for writing and 
illustrating their short stories. 
They'll leam the basic writing 
skills needed to create a book 
and how to draw and com- 
pose animal pictures, Eai 

Id \ illustrated short story 
will be professionally typeset 
and bound to make a per- 
sonal, library-quality hardcover 
book. Children will create their 
books with the help of tl ) 
adult companions. Presei 
by Duncan Ewald. direct< « 
the Center for Student Wi 
and Illustrators. South Orange. 
New Jersey. $7 



Chilean 
Festival 



In conjunction with the 
Mission of Chile Ihe Dep 
in, lit of Education presents a 
mini festival ol films and a 
les of performances tl i 
celebrate the culture of Chile 
and reflect it- sodal political, 

environmental condi- 
tions 

Tickets are $5 per program 
and $4 each for two or more 
programs 1 1 n Further infor- 
mation call (212) 769 5315. 
Monday through li I- 1, iv I|,UI 
am. to 5:00 pm 

Performances 

Grupo Congreso 
Wednesday. March 15 

Grupo Congreso incorpo- 
rates Latin American folklore 
into their music, along with 
jazz and contemporary el. 
ments. Their repertoire In 
eludes themes related to 
ecology, human rights, and 
the extinction ol ani estral 
races 1 1 n performance will 
take place at 8.00 p.m. In the 
Main Auditorium. 

Los Tres 
Sunday. March 19 

The muM<. ofl.os h 

reflects the feelings of Chilean 
youth — the emptiness, lone 
liness. and yearning for love 
that characterize '1 

modern Chilean society. The 
band masterfully Ini i irporates 
elements of Chilean vcmacu- 
lai music and the cueca (the 
Chilean national dance) with 
other forms of folklore [*he 
performances will take place 
at 2:00 and 4 00 pm in the 
Kaufmann Theat' ' 



Film Festival 

All films will be shown In 
the Kaufmann Theater I llms 

m Spanish with English 
subtitles (except as indicai 

Director GonzaloJustn n 

ano, whose works Include 
Los Hips de la Guerra Fria 
(Sons of the Cold War) and 
/\ nr tfll appear at the 

festival. 

Friday. March 24 

800 p.m. Amnesia. (Gon- 
zalo Justimano. I'M l' 1 " 
min.) Filmed In Valparaiso. 
Ihe dunes ol Rltoque -md 
Chanaral. Am m 
stmctsthe fragments of In 

In two time frames, 
yesterday and today. Two 

sol- n0 

one wants to remember 
featured in this psychok • 

thrill.' 



Saturday. March 25 

(0 p.m Julio Comienza 

,<ll hllin ( fl/li 

July). (Silvio ( al02 19 
75 mm ) Sel In southern Chile 
In i')i , this coming ol age 
1,1,,, thi mores md 

habits "i Chilean i ilu 

landowners at the turn "I the 
centni' i he film naflex > • an 
„„„„ eni e losl through mod- 
emlzatton and the exodus of 

wealthy famUl 

,,i p m An hlplefago 

(Archipelago) (Pablo 
men television Nacional di 
Chile 1992. 80 min) A 
I hllean an Mtei I who lakes 
on clandestine politii al ai ttvl 

hoi and in hlsdelli 
,, , m he sees hlmsell on thi 
ind of Chiloe. Thi 
win, I, mixes reality and 
Illusion brings him mi" ">" 

i,„ I with the magical 

di,' Chonolndi.n Has 

a harsh real ii« 

6:00 p.m Va/parai 
(Mariano Ancli.uk 1994 B5 

,,,„, [n Spanish no subtitles.) 

rh&S film, which is based on 

con« emt aban- 
donment, kidnapping, and 

,li ..,,., .,.i.. '\ ailoi arm 

ing in Valparaiso fi n a shori 
tan 
on the run from the Infanl 
trafficking mafia ii"' woman 
Is di iperately looking i- 1 
son and draw • thi allot into 
the intrigue. 



Sunday. March 26 

• mi p mi / a I una tn el 
Moon In 
Mirror). (Andrea 

[990 , , mill ) Don Arnalcl... 
an old and sick seaman, lives 
ui ( (infinement with I 
and controls the life ol 
hoi i ■•' mil 

rors hanging from the walls of 
his room. H i d Lucre- 

, ,., the next door neighbo. 
rebel against Don Am.. I 
and force him to try a lasl 
resort. 

10 p in LoFi i 
(The From neXXJ 

Lt.i panola 

SA. 1990. 1 L5 ) A 

Chi feasor Is exiled to 

La I rontera a li 
once belonged to the Ma- 
puchelndiai etty 

natui it.' wit 

hesi'lfl' 

his relationship - 

key to a painful discovery 



SiDoort lot Uuwvan D«r>-' 

,Uk.C>— M-*-«*n 
IW .Ch-malB*. 
M«vN-F«a*v 

i.uaflontirt 

I «•», Wtbca I 



Cormnurty Tru*. Samjd «<■ 

Borough fWWm •* ManluHix.. ih* Vkkb 
.';,BMm Randolph H«ml 




Courses 

for 
Stargazers 

ASTRONOMY: 
BASIC COURSES 

Introduction to 

Astronomy 

cginning 

Man I, 1-8:40 pm 

$85 r '<» i"i Mi mb 
, non-Memtx 
A first course in astronomy, 
dcsi' Introdua th< 

many interesting aspects i »] 
the universe to i hose without 
a math or physli s 
background ["opii iro lude 
earth as a plan. -t the moon. 
the solar system the stei 
the Milky Wav. gala) 
quasars, and black holes. 
Con hi h.i i observations such 
as planel motions and the 
rising and setting of the sun 
and moon are explained. No 
previous knowledge of astron- 
omy imed. This course 
serves as a prerequisite for 
the intermediate-level 
courses, where specific areas 

. .vered in more detail 
Instructor: Sune Engelbrekt- 

Stars. Constellations, and 
Legends 

I iv. Tuesdays, beginning 
March 28; 6:30-8:10 p.m 

[oi Members 
$80 lor non-Members 

The lore of the sky is intro- 
duced with the Sky Theater's 

projector, which will 
identify the prominent stars, 
constellations, and other sky 
,,hiei is,.| both Northern and 
Southern I lemispheres. The 
myths and legends of many 
cultures relating to the sky, as 
well as galaxies, star clusters, 
and nebulae found among the 
constellations, are illustrated. 
No prerequisites Instructor: 
Henry Bartol. 



Adventures in Astronomy 

Five Saturdays, beginning 
April 8; 9:40-11 40 a.m. 
$67.50 for Members 
lor non-Members 
Confused about the differ- 
ence between a star and a 
planet? Can't tell astronomy 
from astrology? Don't know 
Aquarius from Sagittarius or a 
black hole from a brown 
dwarf 9 Join us for a Saturday 
course foi the whole family 
(ages U) and up) In the Sky 
1 1 ieater and in labs with as- 
tronomical equipment we will 
explore the birth and death of 
stars, the origin of the uni 
verse, the search for extrater- 
restrial life, and the current 
night sky The first hour 
meets in the Sky Theater and 
the second hour in Classroom 
1. Instructor: Craig Small. 



How to Use a Telescope 

Eight Mondays, beginning 
March 27, 6 30-8.40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

An introduction to choos- 
ing and using a small amateur 
telescope. Topics include 
basic optics of telescopes, 
equatorial and altitude az 
imuth mountings, eyepieces, 



10 




and commercial pilots pre- 
pare for the FAA written 
examinations. It can also help 

as a refresher for biennial 
fliqht reviews, relieve some 
instances of fear of flying, and 
survey some aspects of flight 
training and aircraft owner- 
ship Subjects include physio- 
logical factors affecting pilot 
performance, visual and elec- 
tronic navigation (VOR, ADr. 
DME. SAT. NAV. GRS. and 
LORAN). charts, publications, 
computers, principles of aero- 
dynamics, and weather. Stu- 
dents will plan cross-country 
trips and have an opportunity 
to try the flight deck simula- 
tor. Instructor: Ted Cone 



The New Solar System 



collimating a telescope, set- 
ting up for observation, locat- 
ing objects in the sky, and the 
use of charts and other aids 
for observation. No previous 
knowledge of astronomy is 
assumed. This course is par- 
ticularly recommended for 
those considering the pur- 
chase of a telescope and for 
those who have one but 
aren't sure how to use it. 
Instructor: Sam Storch. 

Celestial Highlights 

Four selected Mondays: May 
22, June 19, July 17, Aug. 
21; 6:30-740 p.m. 
$36 for Members 
$40 for non-Members 

This course will focus on 
the interesting and exciting 
events in the skies of the 
coming month. The night sky 
will be accurately simulated by 
the Zeiss projector in the Sky 
Theater, and students will 
Icam how to find prominent 
constellations of the season 
and where and when to see 
gatherings of the moon and 
planets. The Planetarium's 
extensive collection of special 
effects will illustrate upcoming 
celestial events, including 
meteor showers and eclipses. 
Students will also learn about 
current space missions and 
how to find nebulae, star 
clusters, and galaxies that are 
visible through binoculars or 
small telescopes. Instructors: 
Joe Rao and Henry Bartol. 



to be included. Images from 
the many planetary spacecraft 
will be used to complement 
the class lectures and discus- 
sions. Introduction to As- 
tronomy is recommended but 
not required. Instructor: 
Francine Jackson. 

A Little Look at Relativity 

Four Tuesdays, beginning 
March 28. 630-8 10 p.m. 
$67.50 for Members 
$75 for non-Members 

This short course is de- 
signed to serve as a brief 
introduction to the survey of 
Einstein's General and Spe- 
cial Theories of Relativity. A 
basic understanding of ele- 
mentary algebra will be help- 
ful, but no extraordinary IQ is 
necessary Just be prepared 
to check logic and common 
sense at the door and you will 
be ready to enter the exotic 
world of time travel, black 
holes, cosmic wormholes. and 
more. Instructor: William 
Gutsch. 



ASTRONOMY: 

INTERMEDIATE 

COURSES 

The New Solar System 

Eight Thursdays, beginning 
March 30; 6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

Information supplied by 
spacecraft during the past 
decade has made the planets 
exciting subjects for scientific 
study This course will intro- 
duce the planets both as parts 
of the entire solar system and 
as unique bodies Structure, 
composition, weather, rings, 
and satellite systems of the 
planets are among the topics 



Ground School for 
Instrument Pilots 

Fifteen sessions, Tuesdays 
and Thursdays, beginning 
March 28: 6:30-9:00 p.m. 
$166.50 for Members 
$185 for non-Members 

Intended for those planning 
to take the FAA written ex- 
amination for an instrument 
rating. Class meets twice a 
week, concurrently with 
Ground School for Instru- 
ment Pilots (see above for 
details). 

NAVIGATION: 
BASIC COURSE 

Navigation in Coastal 
Waters 

Eight Mondays, beginning 
April 3; 6:30-9:00 p.m. 
$99 for Members 
$110 for non- Members 

An introduction to piloting 
and dead reckoning for present 
and prospective owners of 
small boats. The course pro- 
vides practical chartwork and 
includes such topics as the 
compass, bearings, fixes, 
buoys and lighthouses, the 
running fix, current vectors 
and tides, and rules of the 
nautical road. Boating safety 
is emphasized No prerequi- 
sites. Students are required to 
purchase an equipment kit. 
Instructor: Greg Smith. 



NAVIGATION: 
INTERMEDIATE COURSE 

Trouble Shooting 
Celestial Navigation 

Four Mondays, beginning 
March 27 or April 24; 
6 30-8-.40 p.m. 
$67.50 for Members 
$75 for non-Members 

This short course is de- 
signed for students who are 
self-taught or otherwise famil- 
iar with techniques for navi- 
gating by the stars but in need 
of some practice. Sessions 
will include a review of the 
basic theory, use of Voln 
HO 249. the Rude Star 
Finder and Nautical Almanac 
for pre-calculation of star 
sights, calculation of LAN and 
twilight for star sights; review 
of star sights, moon shots, 
planet shots, and plotting 
and use of celestial comput- 
ers, sextants, and shooting 
techniques. No text is 
required; handouts will be 
provided. This course will be 
offered twice each term In- 
structor: David Berson. 



NAVIGATION: 
ADVANCED COURSE 

Advanced Celestial 
Navigation 

Eight Wednesdays, beginning 
March 29, 6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

This course includes subject 
matter not covered in Intro- 
duction to Celestial Naviga- 
tion with additional practice 
problems for the solution of 
the celestial line of position, 
latitude by meridian transit of 
the sun and other celestial 
bodies, latitude by observation 
of Polaris, computations of 
sunrise, sunset, moonrise, 
moonset, and twilight 
phenomena. Prerequisite 
Introduction to Celestial 
Navigation or equivalent 
experience with the permis- 
sion of the instructor. Instruc- 
tor: Harold Pamham. 



METEOROLOGY 

Weather and Climate 

Eight Thursdays, beginning 
March 30: 630-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

Everyone talks about the 
weather. This course is for 
those who would like to know 
more about the atmosphere 
— how it works and how it 
affects us. Topics include the 
structure and motions of the 
atmosphere, climate, weather 
forecasting, and atmospheric 
phenomena such as 
rainbows, halos, and twin- 
kling stars. No formal training 
in physics or math is required. 
Instructor: Barry Grossman 



AVIATION 

Ground School for Private 
and Commercial Pilots 

Fifteen sessions. Tuesdays 
and Thursdays, beginning 
March 28. 6:30-900 p.m. 
$166.50 for Members 
$185 for non-Members 
This course helps private 



Courses for Stargazers 

1 would like to register for the following Planetarium 
courses(s): 



Name of course: 



Price: (Please note that discount prices apply only to 

Participating and Higher Members.) 



Class beginning:. 
Name: 



Address: 
City: 



Daytime telephone: 



.State: 



_Zip-. 



Membership category: 

Please mail this coupon with your check payable to the 
American Museum-Hayden Planetarium to: Courses for 
Stargazers, Hayden Planetarium. Central Park West at 
81st Street, New York, NY 10024-5192. Registration by 
mail is strongly recommended and is accepted until seven 
days preceding the first class. For additional information, 
call (212) 769-5900. Monday-Friday. 930 a.m.-430 
p.m. No credit cards accepted. Do not include 
ticket requests or checks for American Museum 
programs. 



Members' Tours 

Images 
of Power 

In the course of their field- 
work in Bali during the 1930s 
anthropologists Margaret 
Mead and Gregory Bateson 
collected hundreds of paint- 
ings and sketches by local 
artists. These paintings are 
strikingly different from tradi- 
tional Balinese art forms and 
reveal much about Bali that 
was previously unknown to 



Westerners. 

One hundred such paint- 
ings are on display in Gallery 
77. and Members can take 
guided tours of the exhibition 
/mages of Power: Balinese 
Paintings Made for Gregory/ 
Bateson and Margaret 
Mead The tours will take 
place on Friday, April 21, at 
6:00. 6:30. 700, and 730 
p.m. Use the coupon on page 
3 to order tickets, which are 
free and available only to 
Participating and Higher 
Members ages 16 and older. 



Museum Notes 



Hours 

Exhibition Halls 

Mon.-Thurs. & Sun 10 00 am -5:45 p.m. 

Fri.&Sat 10:00 a.m.-8:45 p.m. 

The Museum Shop 

Mon.-Thurs. & Sun 10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

Fri &S at 1000 a.m-7:45 p.m. 

The Junior Shop _ ._ 

Mon.-Fri 10:00 a.m.-4:45p.m 

Sat. & Sun 10:00 am.-5:45 p.m. 

The Museum Library 

Tues.-Fr. 11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

The Natural Science Center 

For children of all ages and their families. 
Closed on Mondays and holidays. 

Tnps-Fri z-(JU-h:ou p.m. 

Lt. & Sun.:: 100-4:30 p.m. 



Happenings 
at the Hay den 



Lectures 

Frontiers in Astronomy and 
Astrophysics 

On Monday, March 13. at 730 p^m Stephen 
Gregory, professor of astronomy at the University 
of New Mexico, will present an .llustrated talk. 

'^£2^ 10. at 7:30 p.m Torrence 
Johnson, senior research scientist at the Jet Propul- 
sion Laboratory, will present an illustrated talk, 
"The Galileo Mission to Jupiter 

These lectures are part of the Frontiers ,inAs^ 
tronomy and Astrophysics senesjickets are $6 
for Participating and Higher Members an 1 $8 for 
non-Members. For information abou ticket avail 
ability and upcoming lectures, call (212) 769 59UU. 
Use the coupon at right to order tickets. 



Sky Show 

The Ten Most-Asked 
Questions about the 
Universe 

What is a black hole? Is there ^ «lsewte« in tfje 
universe? Does Planet X exist? Are UFO srea ? 
When is the best time to see the Northern bghtv 
What is at the edge of the universe? How will the 
universe end? This Sky Show answers these and 
other frequently asked questions about space. 

Sh 7TZ 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. 

^ ! 100 am (except for March 4). 

100 2 00 3 00. 4 00. and 500 p.m. 
Sun:.. 100, 2 00. 3 00, 400. and 5.00 pm 

Admission (Part.cipat.ng and Higher Members) 

Adults: $4 
Children (2-12). $2 




Naturemax 



The new IM AX film A/rl 
TheSercxgcti > 
relationship! rieda- 

tor and p illoWlngthe 

great migration ol Wilde 
beests. zebras, and other 
animals Miowtimes.n. 

ID IO.hkI i I KM in .«nd 

i |0and I 10 p.m dally 
Yellows lewers 

on .i journey to the national 
. >, i, , dlscovei Its h 

geology, and wildlife Sh< 



Hmesare L2 10 2 10 >nd 
10 p.m 

I rtday and Saturdav al 

6-00 ::i I " ca: 

,1,, tl Is shown -mi ,i 

double bill with Yellowstone 
Schedules and pi 
suoto i to change with' iut 

i all (212] 769-5650 
| , furthei information. 

Admission (Participating 
I [ighei Members) 

Adult (4 
ture $(i double 

Civ !.25 single 

feature; $3.25 doubl. feature 



"Sorcerer's 
•^fcr/j Talismanic 

(W Image," by 
^^F Ida Bogus 

Made Togog, from the 
Images of Power exhibition. 
A demon hurls itself 
headlong through the air 
to attack victims with its 
long thumbnail. 



The Discovery Room 

Passes are distributed at the first-floor informa- 
tion desk beginning at 11.45 a.m. Ages ; 5-15. 
Children must be accompanied by an adult 
Closed on holidays and weekdays 

Sat. & Sun Noon-4:30p.m. 

Museum Dining 

Diner Saurus Fast Service Eatery 

Daily 11:00 a.m.-4:45p.m. 



Garden I )af« --»-.- 

,M,»ns (212) 769 58< -«.„„ 

Lunch: Mon.-F. H 30a.m. • 0p.m. 

I, mm., in &Sa1 »:00 P-m. 

Brunch Sal &Sun 11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m 

W^e'sLab u »os (,.»,.,„ 

gjj " Noon 8:00p.m 

Sun & mostholidayj Noon 5:00 p.m 

Snack Carts , nn „ m 

Sat. & Sun 11 00 a.m.-4.00 p.m. 



Entrances . 

During Museum hours visitors can entei m 

building through the 7 7th ' '" 

parking lot enti ' ''" ' . 

levelt Memorial Hall entrance (79th Street and 

Cental Park West) Visitors attending pro- 

grams after hours can enter the building 

at 79th Street and Central Park West. 



Call (212) 769-5100 for additional information 
and non-Members prices Please note that prl< 
are subject to change without prior notice. 



Exhibition 



The Universe Revealed: Recent Images 
from the Hubble Space Telescope 

This exhibition features photographs of recent 
discoveries made by the Hubble Space Tetescop- 

luding the M87 galaxy (which proves . 
tence of black holes) and images of he Shoemaker 
Levy 9 comet strikes on Jupiter. A 1:15 scale 
model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter deploying the 
Hubble is on display, along with a scale model of 
the Optical Telescope Assembly of the Hubble 
S^ace Telescope and a video of the repair m.ss.on 
of December 1993. 

Children's Shows 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers. Children sing along with .mages of 
Keir favorite Sesame Street Muppets as they learn 

bout rainbows, the phases of itte moon, sun, 
and stars. Sat.. March 4. at 10:30 a.m. and Sat. 
April 1 ^ 10:30 and 1 1 45 a m .Admission I- or 
Pa P riic pahng and Higher Members Is $4 for adul 
and $2 for children Members can purchase up to 
four tickets at the Members pnee. 

Shc^s usually sell out in advance: reservations by 
mail oX, are necessary. Make your check payable 
The Hayden Planetanum (attn: Wonderful Sky^ 
Central Park West a. 81st Street. New York. NY 

10024-5192): .nd.cate membersh.p category and 

J first and second ch< ■■'»■"-■ ** "J to 

nude a Addressed, stamped envelope and your 

Sime telephone number For add.t.onal 

■ToZuon call (212) 7*9-5900 

Robots in Space features Lucasfilm S MD19M 

roSs^ro^^^^*-^ 

Averse See how satellites and probe 
ZceTobots - hell n about worlds near 

and far. Journey from the earth to other p anets 
j jso*-«» hlark holes Sat.. March 4, at l l.<»o 

C is $4 for adults and $2 for children. For tnfor- 
ma«.on. call (212) 769 5900. 



Laser Light Shows 

Joumev into another dlmensV .n where Law utau 
alsandrockini.su comb 

trienceofsightanda I Shojwan ■ i ■••■■■'";■;' 

Fridays and Saturd 01 .8 :3 '. and 10:00 

p.m. For price and show schedule telephone 
,9 .100. 

Its always a good idea to call before visit- 
ing the Planetarium, since prices. program-, 
and showtimes are subject to change without 
notice For general Planetarium information, 
call (212) 769-5100. 



Lecture: "Voids In Space" 

Monday, March I • 1 '> (l i"" 
Number of Meml " rs ttckel .it $6 
(no more than 4. plfi 



Numbei "I non Members tickets al »»;. 
fotalamounl enclosed for program:. 



Lecture: "The Galileo Mission to Jupiter* 

Monday.Ai.nl 10 7:30p.m. 
Number of Members' '■ «l $o 

(no more than 4. please) 

Number of non-Members' tickets at *»: 

fotal amount enclosed for program 



Name 



Addi 



! I lt« 



State 



^ip:- 



ine telephone: 



• Membership category: 

! Please make che. Hayjjn 

, ,,,,„„,„,,,„„ and n, self-addressed 

stamped envelope i Lecture, Hayden 

I New York. NY 10024 5192. 

J Please note that t.cket orders are lubjtd to 
availability and cannot be proce .hout 

' telephone number and stamped, sell add 
1 envelope Do not include ticket requests or 
'. checks for American Museum programs. 



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For 



Participating and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



Vol. 20. No. 4 Apnl 199 








( 



Na.tooa! Ck^raphK Sco^/Hugo «- U**k 



An Evening with Jane Goodall 

Tuesday, April 25 

7:00 p.m. 

Main Auditorium _u«« 

$22 for Members, $30 for non-Members 



Famed ethologist Jane Goodall will 
appear at the American Museum this 
month to discuss her field research 
among the chimpanzees of Tanzania s 
Gombe Stream Research Centre 
Goodall has studied the chimps' indi- 
vidual and social behavior patterns 

e 1960. her work represents the 
longest continuous research project 
ever conducted on animals in the wild. 



The world knew little about the 
behavior of chimpanzees when 
Goodall first ventured into the Afncan 
bush She was the first person to ob- 
serve and record chimpanzees making 
and using tools - a behavior that was 
previously thought to be unique to 
humans. She was also the first to 
observe the complexities of 
chimpanzee communities, recording 



the affectionate bonds between moth 
.ffspnng and the pil 

mates' so, "» of 

cooperative hunting. 

The author of six books and the 
recipient of numerous awards. 
Goodall remains one of 1 1 
renowned and respected l In 

the world Her efforts not onl 
protecting wild chimp populations but 



also improving the llv< 

■npanzees. Now in her fourth 
decade of study i 
Goodall and I famous 

world through hci books, 
herapp* laltonal Geo- 

graphic Society specials and her an- 
nual lecture tOUI 

Use the April Members programs 
coupon on page 3 to register. 



Spring Break Workshops 



April 18-20 




Members' Tours 

Images of Power 

Friday, April 21 



Naturalist June Myles will 
I,. , .1 workshops for kids be- 
tween the ages of 6 and ! I 
i hjrfng the week that school is 
out. The workshops will take 
place between LO 30 a.m. 
.ml noon. Tickets are $18 
each and available only by 
,,, fl to Participating and 
I lighter Member, Us- 
coupon on page5toregi 
Ugh! A Bug! Tuesday, 
April 18. Participants will 
, ,,.,[«• a bug mask .md learn 
aboni Ins© i habitats and 
behavior They'll H the 

U Spiders! exhibition. 



By the Power of their 
Dreams. Wednesday. April 
19 The most important of a 
Plains Indian warriors posses- 

is was his buffalo-hide 
medicine shield. Children will 
look at the role of shields in 
the lives of Plains Indians and 
mi. ike a shield to take home. 

125 and Still Counting 
Thursday. April 20. Kids will 
explore the Museum's history 

I he exhibition The First 
125 Years and create a sou- 
venir pop-up book to com- 
memorate some of the 
highlights 




» 









« 



Zebra Mussels: Alien Invaders 

Wednesday, April 12 



in ti,.- late L980sa fresh 
water mollusk known as the 
| was introduced 
Into the ( to al I J ' 'egion, 
and since then tt's spread 
mroughoul firewater 
streams and lakes. No one 
knows as yet the extent ol the 
zebra mussels' impact on the 
ecosystem, but they could 
cause major changes in the 
freshwater systems where 



they're found. In the mean- 
time, they're serious pests 
thai clog intake pipes such as 
.<> of water supply systems 
and i m >wer plants, and th. ■» 
presence has added millions 
of dollars to the operating 
costs of many facilities. 

Sidney Horenstein, the 
Museum's coordinator of 
environmental public pro- 
M,..ms, will use slides to illus- 



trate the potential problems 
that zebra mussels represent 
to the ecosystem and the 
methods that are being stud- 
ied to control this invasive 
species. 

The program will take 
place at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Kaufmann Theater. Tickets 
are $6 for Members and $9 
for non-Members, use the 
coupon on page 3 to register. 



Members' Adult-Child Workshop 

The Mouse in the Matzoh Factory 

Sunday. April 9 



The mouse returns f< > 
sixth annual .ippearance at 
the Museum for a special 
Passover program of songs. 
laughter, and matzoh making 
Author Franc ii if Medofi will 
read her story The Mouse in 
the Matzoh Factory, and 
then each child will help her 
mix the dough for matzoh. 



Participants will take the 
dough home with them to 
bake in their own kitchens. 

Workshops will take place 
at 11:00 am , 12 30. and 
2:00 p.m. The program lasts 
approximately 45 minutes 
and is appropriate for chil- 
dren between the ages of 5 
and 8. Tickets are $16 per 



couple and available only by 
mail to Participating and 
Higher Members. 

Please note that all atten- 
dees must have tickets and 
that Members are limited to 
four tickets per request for 
this popular show. 

Use the coupon on page 5 
to register. 



Members' Museum Tour 

Ages of Rock 

Friday, April 28 



Sidney I lorenstein the 

Museum's coordinator of 
environmental publl< pro- 
grams will li Ing 
walk around the Museum and 
poinl i iuI the fossils In 
building s walls and floors. 
i u tour will step outside for 



an overview of the Museum - 
geology, geography, and 
varieties of an hite< tural 

Inside they'll 
survey the diversity of stones 
used in the building scon 
struction and hear about the 
geologic. il history ihe stones 



reveal. 

Tours will take place at 
4:00, 5:30. and 7:00 pm 
Tickets are $16 and available 
only by mail to Participating 
and Higher Members. Use 
the coupon on page 5 to 
register 



In the course of their field- 
work in Bali during the 
1930s anthropologists Mar- 
garet Mead and Gregory 
Bateson collected hundreds 
of paintings and sketches. 
These paintings are strikingly 
different from traditional 
Balinese art forms and reveal 
much about Bali that was 
previously unknown to West- 
erners. 

One hundred such paint- 



ings are on display in Gallery 
77, and Members can take 
guided tours of the exhibition 
Images of Power: Balinese 
Paintings Made for Gregory 
Bateson and Margaret Mead. 
The tours will take place at 
6:00, 6-.30, 7:00, and 7 30 
p.m. Use the coupon on page 
3 to order tickets, which are 
free and available only to 
Participating and Higher 
Members ages 16 and older 



Members' Workshop for Adults 

April Showers 

Friday, April 21 



Celebrate the season by 
painting an umbrella to match 
your mood (or raincoat). We'll 
provide the umbrella and the 
paints; you provide the senti- 
ment. You'll never again 
wonder which umbrella be- 
longs to you. 

The workshop, which is 
geared toward ages 16 and 
older, will take place from 
6:30 to 8:00 p.m. Tickets are 
$35 and available only by 
mail to Participating and 
Higher Members. Use the 
coupon on page 5 to register. 





ISSN 0194-6110 

Vol. 20, No. 4 
April 1995 



Donna Bell — Editor 

Sheila Greenberg — Manager of Membership Services 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Robert Jahn — Program Coordinator 

Peter Zelaya — Special Projects Coordinator 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and Higher 
Members of the American Museum of Natural History is 
published monthly September through June, bimonthly July a 
August Publication offices are at Natural History magazine 
American Museum of Natural History. Central Park West at 
Street, New York, NY 10024-5192. Telephone: &}*)'*> 
5606. Subscriptions: $50 a year for Participating Membei 
$100 a year for Contributor Membership. 
© 1995 American Museum of Natural History. Second-cic 
postage paid at New York. NY. Postmaster. Please send aaor* . 
changes to: Rotunda. Membership Office. American Musei i 
Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New Yon 
NY 10024-5192 
Printed by Waldon Press. Inc.. New York 



Earth Day 

Saturday, April 22 



1 




Celebrate Earth Day at the Museum, where geologist Sidney Horensjein 
Department of Entomology will talk about common tnsects of the area. 



Sea Change 

Marine biologist and underwater 
explorer Sylvia Earle dtscusses the 
precarious state of our seas and offers 
a blueprint for change 

Tuesday, April 18 
7:30 p.m. 
Kaufmann Theater 

Free 



In our lifetime, we have literally ; Messed a s^ change. 
Our generation came along at a time when natural ocean 
systems were still largely intact. In a few decades, our 
speeds has squandered assets that have been thousands of 
mTennia in tt making -and were still domg , 1 rtEuen , htite 
kids can see the trashing of beaches that were pnstm :a ew 
years ago. What we must do is encourage a see i change in 
attitude one that acknowledges that we are part of the l.vmg 

world, not apart from it. Oceans 

from Sea Change: A Message of the Uceans 




One of America's leading 
underwater explorers and 
environmentalists sounds a 
call to arms to protect the 
oceans in her book Sea 
Change, a view of how the 
sea has altered significantly in 
the past 50 years. In this 
special program for the Mu- 
seum. Sylvia Earle offers a 
candid look at the current 
state of our seas and a first- 
hand review of the conse- 
quences of human abuse of 
the most important common 
property on the planet 

Earle's personal observa- 
tions from her many years of 
experience as a deep-sea 
diver enable her to paint a 
vivid portrait of the world's 
oceans. She'll also discuss 
current maritime laws and 
policies to show how nations 
are scrambling to stake their 
claims to the ocean's vast 
mineral resoun es .indshell 
explain why wild ocean popu- 
lations are collapsing in «•■ 
I easing numU 
The former chief scientist 
he National Ocea. 
graphic and Atmospheric 
Association. Earl 
of Deep Ocean Engineenng. 
a company she co-founded in 
1981 that builds state-oft h. 
art deep-sea submersibles. 

The free program is spon- 
sored by the Center for Biodi- 
versity and Conservation and 
presented in conjunction with 
the publication by G I ' P 
nam's Sons of Earle's new 
book Sea Change. A Mes- 
sage of the Oceans The 
book will be available for 
purchase at the program, and 
Earle will sign copies after her 
lecture. Use the coupon at 
right to register. 



April Members* 
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Total amount enclosed. 

Please make check (if applicable) payable to the America" 
, im ,,i Natural History and mail with a solf- 
addressed, stamped envelope to: April Members < 
grams. Membership Office. American Museum of Natural 
,ry Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 
10024 -5192 Telephone reservations are not accep- 
ted. No refunds or exchanges. 

Unless otherwise indicated, no more than eight 
tickets may be ordered for a program rariici- 
pating Members are entitled to four tickets per 
program at the Members' price Higher Members 
are entitled to six tickets, and Associate Members 
are entitled to one ticket. 

Zebra Mussels. Wednesday April L2, i 00 p.m 
Number of Members Hckel at $6: — 
Numbei oi additional tl I ets at $9-. — 
total ..mount enclosed for pi >"i>»" — 

Sea Change. Tuesday. April 18. 7:30 p.m 
Number of free Members' tickets 
(no more than 4. please): — 

i Members' Tours of Images of Power I riday, April 
! 21 Please indwte a first, second, and third choice. 

_6:00 p.m. . _6:30 p m „7:00 p.m. _7:30 p m 

Number of fro Members tickets 

(no more than 2. please): — 

An Evening with Jane Goodall 

Tuesday. April 25. 7 I m 

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J amount enclosed for program: — 

Collecting Fossils in the Sands of Mongolia 
Thursday, May 4 m 

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Sexual Legacies, rhui iy 11, 7:00 p.m 

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iunl enclosed foi program: — 

Seismosaurus: The Earth Shaker 

Wed. May 24. fl. 

NumberofMemb •' |°= — 

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jamounl enclosed f«.i program 

The Jews of Yemen. Tuesday. May 30. 7:00 p m 
Number of ketsat$7 

Number of additional tickets at $10: — 
! Total amount enclosed for program: 



! NOTE Orders received less than ten days before 
! show dates will be held for pick-up at the door on 
the day of the program if tickets are st.llj ,vailab te. 
'■ H an event is sold out, you will be advised m wnt.ng 
! or by phone and your check will be returned. 



The Jews of Yemen: 
A Vanishing Culture 

Tuesday, May 30 
7:00 p.m. 



Yemenite woman in bridal gown 




Beth Shearim, i he most 
famous lewlsh cemetery in 
the Neai Easl during the third 
cen(l itains a Yemenite 

. ... ..(omb. This burial site is 

,1,1 1,, nil to reach. Us entrance 

vrgrown, and the ids, rip 

In red pigmenl h 

obliterated : 

Hme and weathei rhose thai 

can still be read form the firsl 

:,„„.,! evidence of an i 
tabllshed Jewish community 
in Yemen. 
For centuries th< lew 

yed freedom and 

,„,. lint vvilh tin 

ol the last lewlsh king — 
..ding to legend he rode 
his horse into . — and 

metal >f Islam, 

-tripped 
of their land, forbidden to 
farm and confined within 
small areas ol villages and of 

I he 

crowded ghetto of Sai i 

Yemi 

o| architecture known 

■ere else in th. M 
Ud the only v. 
allowed them — that of ai I i 



sans — becoming skilled sil- 
versmiths, coppers: ml I is 
weavers, woodworkers, and 

masons . ,^ro 

Between 1948 and 1950 
large numbers of Yemenite 
Jews emigrated to Israel. 
I [ttle was known about those 
who remained behind 

In Jews of Yemen A Van 
Ishing Culture filmmaker 
Johanna Spector takes the 
viewer to Yemen to visit the 
few remaining Jews in 
I laidan; however, all customs 
and ceremonies were filmed 
in modem-day Israel, where 
■ "i" nine to 
practice their old traditions. 
The Mm in. I... ies footage 
of traditional Yemei 
orations rituals dances, and 
mink SpectOl Si nnera en- 
ters the homes ol 
Yemenite families as they 

[ebrateth iver Seder 

M1 « ,i are unique to 

Yemenite Jews bul dlffei 
from region to region m 
Yemen 

In one segment — a pre- 
u.dding ceremony — a 




Seismosaurus: 
The Earth Shaker 



Wednesday, May 24 

7:00 p.m. 
Kaufmann Theater 

$8 for Members, 
$12 for non-Members 

The newest and largest 
dinosaur to be added to the 

ranks of the Mesozoic giants 
\s Seismosaurus hallow, 

from the Morrison Formation 
(Upper Jurassic) of New Mex- 
ico Paleontologist David 
Gillette will talk with Members 
about this prehistoric behe- 
moth, which is the longest 
dinosaur ever discovered (an 
estimated 150 feet) and per- 
haps the largest, too -it - 
thought to have weighed 1UU 
tons, or the weight of 20 
average elephants. 

Seismosaurus represents 
the pinnacle of success of the 

massive sauropods. which 
reached their greatest diver- 
sity in the Jurassic and then 
suffered near-extinction at the 
Jurassic-Cretaceous bound- 
ary, the Sauropod Crisis, its 
excavation involved the use of 
high-tech instruments to look 
for the bones underground. 
More than 240 stomach 
stones (gastroliths) were exca- 
vated with the skeleton, mdi- 



I 

v 

f 
/ 
i 



young bride wears anklets to 
protect her from the evil eye. 
a pearl-studded headdress, a 
gold brocade coat, and vast 
amounts of jewelry, including 
necklaces, earrings, and six 
bracelets, worn in a 
prescribed order (All jewelry 
is considered magical, since 
its tinkling is thought to drive 
away evil spirits.) The bride is 
seen celebrating in the com- 
pany of women only, for 
women do not dance or sing 
in the company of men Only 
at certain points of the 
prenuptial ceremony are her 
father, brothers, and uncles 
permitted to be present. 

The Jews of Yemen had 
its premiere at the Museum In 
1 ! >86. Filmmaker Johanna 
Spector. who is an ethnomu 
si< ologist and an expert on 
Yemenite music will intro- 
duce the 78-minute lilmand 
answer questions aftei its 
screening This program is 
two hours long and the fourth 
m a series of Spectoi s ethno 
graphic films Use the coupon 
on page 3 to register. 



David Gillette 



eating that sauropods had 
both crop and gizzard as spe- 
cialized chambers of the di- 
gestive tract. 

Gillette became state pale- 
ontologist of Utah in 1988 
after serving for five years as 
the curator of paleontology al 
Albuquerque's New Mexico 
Museum of Natural History, 
where he initiated the Seis- 
mosaurus Project. He is also 
the chief scientist for the 
Southwest Paleontology 
Foundation, Inc., which spon- 
sored the Seismosaums Pro 
ject, and consultant scientist 
at Los Alamos National Labo- 
ratory, where much of his 
research in technological 
applications was conducted. 

Use the April Members 
programs coupon on page 3 
to register. 



Members' Walking Tour of a 

Manhattan Mosque 

Saturday, May 20 
11:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 
$20, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 
Ages 16 and older 



Members can take a guided 
tour of the Manhattan Mosque 
at 96th Street. The mosque, 
which was completed in 
1991, was built by the Islamic 
Cultural Center Foundation. 

Architect Mustafa Abadan, 
who was the building's senior 
designer, will lead the tour of 
the mosque's interior and 
offer an overview of its exte- 
rior. He'll begin with an intro- 



duction to Islamic architecture 
and describe the attempts to 
interpret traditional motifs 
within a modern-day urban 
context. 

Participants must be lb or 
older and women should be 
sure to wear a head covering 
Use the coupon on page 5 to 
register, and please note that 
tickets are available only by 
mail. 



Spring Cruise 

on Long Island Sound 

Sunday, May 7 

^fc, $65 for non-Members 



Spend a spring afternoon 
speeding along Long Island 
Sound on this Members' 
cruise. Participants will travel 
from the foot of Wall Street 
up the East River, through 
Hell Gate, and beneath the 
Throgs Neck Bridge into the 
sound They'll view both the 
New York and Connecticut 
shorelines on the way to New 
Haven Harbor and back. 
Sidney Horenstein. the 



Museum's coordinator of 
public programs, will host the 
cruise and point out la™ 1 " 
marks along the way. He II 
discuss the origins of the 
sound, the geology of shore- 
lines, and the history of some 

of the shoreline towns 
Bring a bag lunch: refresh 

ments are available on board 
Use the coupon on page b to 
register; tickets are available 
only by mail. 



Sexual Legacies 

How Ancient Gender Differences 

influence Our Lives 

\r)the Office and the Home 

Thursday, May 11 
7:00 p.m. 

^mESSE $10 for non-Members 



Why can't a man be more 
l,ke a woman? Why can t a 

woman be more like a man? 
At the Members' program 
Sexual Legacies anthropolo- 
gist Helen Fisher will explore 
gender differences in behavior 
and the brain. 

Rsher will use slides to 
trace the evolution of 
male/female variations back 
to their origins among our 
hunting and gathering ances- 
tors on the grasslands of 
Africa some 4 million years 
ago. She'll explain how our 
modern Western myths about 
the genders emerged with the 
agricultural revolution. Using 
these data on gender legacies, 
Fisher will offer an anthropo- 
logical perspective on con- 
temporary issues, including 
intimacy, sexuality, romantic 
love and infidelity, flirting and 
sexual harassment, communi- 
cation styles, and gender 
tactics in business and family 
life. She'll conclude with sev- 
eral predictions about 
women, men, sex, and power 
In the coming decades. 

A research associate in the 
Department of Anthropology 
at Rutgers University. Fisher 
has written numerous schol- 
arly and popular articles and 

books. Her most recent book. 



Members' Adult-Child Workshop 



Native American Bead Weaving 

Sunday. May 21 

l^-SJS. -do^n onlv *> Palpating and Higher Members 

Ages 8 and older 




Parents and children can 
learn a traditional craft b i 
gether at a workshop on Na- 
tive American bead weaving. 

i*ll find In n among 

the exhibits in the halls of 
Plains Indians and Eastern 
Woodlands Indians, where 
many of the displays include 
colorful beaded jewelry and 



other ornaments rhentheyl 
makeaslmpl< loom and 
learn weaving technlqt 

., ipants will <■ 

beads to make earrings, 
bracelets, rings, and 
jewelry 

The 90-minute workshop 
vdfl be conducts >ol 

Bowen. who is a museum 



educatoi al the Si 
Children s Museum Bowen 
taught people of all ages 
for ten years al museums and 
publli schools i nroUmenl In 
,p is limited to 22 

couples. Use thi coupon 

this pag< 

pl € foattickel in 

illable onlj bj mail 



Collecting Fossils in the Sands of 
Mongolia: Following in the Footsteps 
of Roy Chapman Andrews 



1 



Helen Fisher 



Anatomy of Love: A Natural 
History of Matmgs. Mar- 
riage, and Why We Stray, 
was chosen as a notable book 

'04 by the New York 
Times and has been pub- 
lished in 16 countries. She is 
host of the 1995 four-part 
television series, Anatomy of 
Love, which is based on this 

book. , 

Use the April Members 
programs coupon on page 3 
to register. 



ismksssssss: 



Mouse in £'££* ' F °TZ*Vl°Zft°Spr,n 3 
(indicate a f.rst and second cho.c of ^™ ril £,J ers . 

Members' Cruise on Long Island Sound 



Name(s) of program(s): 



I Number of .icke.s and pnee (please mdta*e*du»o 
! gram if more than one):. 



Total amount enclosed:. 



Name: . 



Address: 



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l\p. 



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Membership category 

Please make check payable to the Amenc^^^d! 

Natural History and mail w.in Works h<- 

I stamped envelope to: T°" r * °™ m o{ Natural 
! Membership Office Arnencar ' Museu ^ 

! History. Central Park West at 79th srre 
! NY 10024-5192. 







m„.. A PrWcMla and Malcolm 

tacular fossil finds. Curator of Fos 

Malcolm McKenna ^JsFnck^u ' ^ 

sil Mammals in the ^P**™" *™ s of the 

leontology. will *$™J^*i"£Z abiut lo- 
expedition. PnscdlaMcKenna ^ nomadJc 

gistics. navigation, camp Uje. ana 

people of the Gobi QQ |f| the 

The program will ««*« P 1 ^ $6 for Members 
Kaufmann Theater. ™« f ? ."*£ L ril Members- 
end $9 for non-Members^ Use i **P 
programs coupon on page 3 to registe 




Evolution in Disturbed Places 



An Interview with 
Franqois Vuilleumier 

By Ruth Q. Leibowitz 

::;Hr §T 

f 

Mn forest to the west and steppe to 



60 U*-^"^ 



Dl ^.lleumier. whet led i»u to become o 

- ';;:::;',;„„„.. mm*, m ^ n** My 

X'' Sh h «"™* in 9 a 8 ™* .here My 

=5 35?- 

Hecolle. ' ,,lans ^ 1 7 S, 

of Geneva's......"..! history ''''''V'^ °^ lo cal 

•325 

1 was writing things In my notebooks, and tnai 
haven I stopped since. 

Ktlmore eloquent speaker, at the meet- 
* „ about mammals. Bu riak 

CSeTouttob hard *^J°Jf£L 

because many of them are nocturnal. I lived In the 

^^.^.^....wouldntletmegooutabne 

ny 1 ,1k. to spend the night in a sleeping bag in 

°he woods to study (<>xes or othe.r mammals. The 
malsl could see from my home were 
, nilK bu1 there were lots of birds around the 

rc ls so 1 started looking at H u -turds. 
You'ue done the ma/orityo/ your work in 
South America. What drc you to this continent, 
and to Patagonia in par, M» It chance or 

a de< Islon vou made long ago 

1 think it was both Long ago 1 wen to nor hem 
Patagonia and visited [1 .rests and ahttie bit ■ >l the 
steppe and liked the area very much. 1 «nsused 
some bird populations and did some collecting and 
Idedone day Id like to go back and explore ,n 

greater detail. 

How long ago was that' . , 

foan you want to remember! 

South America has many species of birds - 
than any other continenl Many of these birds 
S endemic to the continenl - meaning restated 
,r a portion of it and an lunique in tennsof 
,,„„ , n g eachothe r and among 

othei evolutionary biologist, my Merest 

is why they are there! ^V*Za 

attonshipwithaparh. ofveg 

etation ' "™ long ago 

didth. ve.andfromv ralstoctef 

W1 , ,1 to? How many species live 

together Inpartlcu lai rhere are many qu 

ol this kind. 
Patago. not have that nv 

bute ^ you taw a widened mem. 

IndudlnTa number of endemics «^**J 
forests or the steppes, for instance But it Is difficult 

to know where some species occur because mil. h 

information 1- still missing. So 1 designed a project 

to study that fauna in detail ov. years, and 

,,,,!,,„ at two levels tosl study the whole fauna by 

getting to know as many buds as l could with the 

, of writing an overview; second, approach in 

detail only a lew selected groups that seem to pose 

1 lal types ol evolutionary problems 

How about focusing on the selected groups — 

how did you decide which groups to study, and 

how did vou go about designing su< h a study? 






I chose five groups to study in <«•» * «*• One 
,roup of scavenging falcons called the 
raracaras Another is the seedsmpes. a grousehke. 

Hr^.n four is called the miners because they exca 

LnHemic soecies in Patagonia Two kinds occur side 
I; d'e^n" no one really knew if there were one or 
two species or how long ago they evolved to be as 

,h r^you choose which group to concen- 

,r WeMhat was easy The caracaras are rare and 
dirficuft to see or collect. The seedsmpes occur on 
mountains, and to observe them you have to 
make long, difficult horseback trips and camp - 
rough weather, so 1 had to give hose up. The cm 
clodes that are most interesting live on remote is- 
25s and you need special naval vessels to take 
you theTe. The navy isn't interested in the birds, so 
you can only spend an hour on an island - if you 
a^kfeky By default, 1 focused on the miners and 
the Kes. To me. the finches are the most inter- 

esting o 

What makes their situation unique? 
There are several factors. Other species .of sierra- 
finches occur in Patagonia and farther north in the 
Andes all of which live in very open environments 
- steppes, tundra, and scrubby areas around 
human villages. Only one species lives in forests, 
and this ecological shift is W^?™™™^ 
rare 1 thought. 'Here is something of interest that 
should give me some information about how spec.es 
evolve." The two habitats, forest and steppe, are 
adjacent to each other. They have a 1.500-mile- 
fong border, and the birds could theoretically move 
between the two without any trouble 

The more traditional idea of evolution has usu- 
ally said that there would have to be — 

A barrier, that's right. And there is nothing obvi- 
ous there. So 1 looked at specimens in museums. I 
was thinking that if they are really closely related 
and if they have evolved from a common ancestor a 
3»rt time ago. then in the right places they should 
produce hybrids, because their gene : pools ^should 
not be very different from one another Who knows 
what separated them in the past? Today not much 
seems to be separating them, except a border be- 
tween forest and steppe, which is shrubby and 
where neither species seems to occur. But human 
beings have been there for a while and have cut up 
these intermediate zones to raise sheep and cut 
timber. In the far south, for example, the human 
disturbance of the habitat began about 1 50 ■years 
ago This might have allowed the forest birds to go 
Lb or the steppe birds to go toward the 
forest In either case, the two species would meet 
The two groups are definitely separate species. 
Today, most ornithologists would probably con- 
ader them separate. 

What do they look like? Are the two groups 

very different? 




Actually, there are very few differences. They 
both have gray heads. Underneath they are bright 
qreenish to yellow, and on the back they re greenish 
oKe or chestnut brown They're dainty little birds 
Sat hop on the ground to feed and then fly up to 
bushes or trees to nest. They look very much like 

^utaw one of the forest birds and one of 
the steppe birds side by side 

You could sometimes tell them apart, particularly 
in full breeding plumage. The steppe male, called 
he gray-hooded sierra-finch, is more f^™*^ 
neath and greenish yellow on the back and he has 
qufte a S of white on the underbelly. The male of 
?h" forest-dwelling species, called the Patagon-n 
sierra-finch, is more greenish yellow underneath 
distinctly chestnut on the back and has le|* white 
on the underbelly. The female forest bird is a j» er 
version of the male, whereas the steppe female is 
more brownish and has some streaks on the chest 
and the chin. But then, in different times of year 
you see birds hopping around that have any kind f 
plumage in between, and these are very difficult to 

Pl ^figured if they are very closely related and if the 
breakdown of the forest-steppe boundary tea sec- 
ondary thing that's attributable to human activities, 
and if I know where these places are and find a 
road going through them, will sample bird s from 
forest to steppe and 1 should f.nd hybnds 1 made 
this hypothec in 1984. In '85 I had National Ge* 
graphic money. 1 chose Tierra del Fuego in Chile 
a road there goes between steppe and forest - and 
on the first trip out we found a nest that was bu.lt b& 
a male of the pure forest form and his mate who 
looked like a pure steppe bird They were shH bu, d 
ing the nest when we found it We waited, and ate 

on they laid eggs. The ^9t hatched K t n l P n ^ U ce 
three chicks, so we know they are able to produce 

hybrid offspring. Thpse 

1 couldn't collect everything the first year. These 
are common birds, by the way so any sa/nphngl 
did would not jeopardize any of the specie j in ques 
tion But the Chilean authorities allowed only w 
birds per species per year, so in order to have 




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enough of a sample I made three trips. These sam- 
ples are still being analyzed. We have skins and 
tissues that are being worked on. It's a fairly com- 
prehensive study. 

fe's incredible that you /ound a hybrid nesr on 
your very first try 

It was very exciting, especially since the nests 01 
these birds are not easily found 

Do the tu>o types make the same kind o/ nest' 

Very similar. They are cups full of rough-looking 
dry vegetation lined with wool and softer plant ma- 
terials The eggs look very much the same, as do 
the chicks. It would be hard to distinguish the 
species by the nest alone without seeing the adults 

3 °When we found the hybrid nest we wanted to 
watch the birds" behavior, so we spent an entire day 
watching the parents come and feed their three 
chicks. From just watching with binoculars it seemed 
that the male was pure forest form and the female 
was pure steppe. After watching for hours we de- 
cided we had to collect, since that's the only proof 
of a hybrid pair in this complex situation. I collected 
them, which wasn't easy because they were very 
stealthy in their approach to the nest 

We prepared them right away. Afterward, as I 
was taking notes, 1 thought. "My God - they re not 
quite what I thought they were. She was actually a 
hybrid, not pure steppe. 

What gave them away were their weights Later 
on as we collected more birds, 1 realized that one of 
the major differences between these two wasn t 
color or song but weight The steppe bird is much 
heavier than the forest one. The forest s.erra-f.nch 
weighs usually 25 to 27 grams, both males and 
females (except for a female w.th an egg inside of 
her). The steppe sierra-finch usually weighs 29- 6 1 
grams. So there is at least a ^o-gram difference 
between them, which in a bird this light is a fair 

Pe After a r 9 e^rn,ng for a third season we plotted the 
birds' weights, and you can see that the pure-look- 
ing birds fall into one group of weights either Mow 
or high) and the apparent hybrids on plumage char 
acters fall in between _ 

Sometimes you can t really tell by plumage The 
growth and the molt - all of this has ye. to be 
worked out. We don t know what happens after 
they hatch and become fledglings - what the. j»rs 
plumage is. how they turn into adul \ff*&- "™ 
happens a year later. Are they in full adult breeding 
plumage a year later (as normally P*f e "™ bl lf 
are), or do they retain some juvenile features ^as 
some other birds do? None of this is ^°wn yeT So 
its kind of exc.ting because there are still so many 

questions , ., 

Have you continued to find hybrids. 
In 87 and 88 I went back to the same tes and 
to other places. I discovered that in most s. tes there 
was no hybridization, only in two or three. I found 
that hybndization seems to occur in disturb* I places 
- places that used to have more forest and I now 
have more grassland or scrub, mostly due to sheep 
or cattle 



Could vou say that this is an example of 
human destruction of habitat slowing d<>< 
even reversing "natw -lution? In a way if S 

keeping the gene pool mixed instead of allot: 
the species to continue to separate 

That's nght. You could imagine a situation in 
which further destruction or modification of habitat 
leads to more massive hybridization, and what are 
now probably two species hybridize so much along 
a common front that they will merge genetically, bo 
natural biodiversity was to form twi i i m i ies from 
one stock. Then we came along, cul th« torest tor 
timber, opened up the steppe for sheep to graze, 
and perhaps these birds will go back to one gene 

P °The first three trips — in "85, '87. and '88 — I 
worked a lot on the finches, and the last three - In 
•91 '92 and '93 — much less been ■««■ I was focus- 
ing on other aspects of evolution in birds of that 

re *How do you decide which birds to collect when 
uou're in the field? 

There are many factors, so it s not an easy q 
tion to answer Let's go back to the sierra -fori. :h. ■ 
You suspect that they hybridize. To prove Jus, you 
need specimens that later will tell you yes. I hey are 
intermediate between A and B The first thing to do 
is to design a sampling protocol to get pure A, then 
pure B then zoom in on an area where you m 
have AB. You try to have equal numbers of males 
and females, because there might be differences 
between the sexes in terms of plumage and other 

Ch BseSly S you collect what there is and you re 
not too discriminating in that phase of the study. 
What you have to be careful about is .going | to pi... 
where there are enough of these birds so that your 
sample does not diminish the population. These 
finXs are abundant In the forest, you scatter he 
effort over maybe a kilometei square As you are 
Preparing the skins, the birds are idO staging over 
Sou? head. In the steppe the habitat is more open 
^ you have to travel greater distances to get your 
sample. As you return, the birds are still staging 

^TuXTylds are not common V. A. 

anyone know'that they are hybrids unul vou v, 

fected? No one will take your word if you say. 

seen hybrids.- So you ne< mens. In the 

ase of that nest, we arrived there and sav 
oTest b.rd and a female who looked like a s,e, 

b°rd with their ch.cks - there was no cho.ee We 

C °"nZ^f collect the specimens, and how do 

^itsCun^th very small lead pellets that 
don? damage the sk,n The bird falls clean (you 
have to be a good shot) You can t afford to lose a 
specimen -They are precious and each specimen 
presents information So you saenhee a Me 
against the information. You don t wan the 
wounded bird to disappear - then It will d.e. So 1 



usually do the collecting because I m a good si- 
lt I .died a given bird il.\ 1 know 
when I'vt I a limil to what 1 1 an learn about 
,, die Individual singing out there 
uJillteUme morenowll IcoHed him ih«-.. led- 
um dj and al the right time and thai bird falls 
dead It s i H it wounded, only to disappear I gel 

eclmenand take the ttssuesoul II s some 
thing that I follow up on ["hen rtata pride In 

I I've done the job right and tl >aw 

all thi ' ' ,b " ul ll " s : 

Many people have a problem with the taking of 
,,rre$eanh U'san Issue that makes 
uondei whethei oufdbesald In a 

piih/n ution , 

| think it should be said, bi h..uldnt 

hid. I that the strength of tins institution Is In 

lts .. s TakeafoSSll hall wh.-n vou open .i 

fossil hall, these speclmensare long dead 

haven'l lolled them — fine. Th« toworfc 

on living insects, hi.. to 

coll. ively to know wh 

th e big DD1 care In 

pci 

cause Iheli othindui toDDI Ingestion 

i couldn i alcium l low did 

find ' '"' 

.npurpos. lentathe 

kOs ind 'Os I*he thl< I i alcium 

content of thi Wlthoul 

heconm enmuch 

more difficult to mal 

So 1 thinkci<ii.-. lions are i rui la! to an understand 
ingof bicd. id thai people should undei 

stand why II they still fei '' '•''"" 

bu But I think they should know that tl 

killing ol birds foi coll.-non p...|)osesisa 

,„ in the chemeol thin 

birds are killed each] Ies on roads than 

„, ..ntifli coll© ting More l 

\. A w,. { \ b cuttl w hectares ol rein Fon I tl 

have collected since the beginning ol tl 
AMNH collection 120yearsago ["hi 
at we make no denl 
Say you want t ,ou would... 

know today th.. i biod 
South A..... reatei if it weren t f or 

thel itathe trays the; areaucn 

an important way of knowing 

Bythewav. mosi ol us he curatorial stall In 

(hl . ; enl and othei departmenl 

a. nve members of conservation organizaUi 
.. Ii included. 

Since that wonderful day m I''' 
continued to study these i > 

I infortunately. I have no new Information on 
hybridization ita From 89to 91 Ispenl 

iun,n ■. parts of the hem hemlsphei 

,,,„„ mi n othei parts of Patagonia. I hope 

to qo back to the fon-M area and now thai Ithinkl 
know what me hybrids look like, I'd like to go to the 

,,„. ,f Chile farthei nowhere hybrids 

have not been described yel ro the extent thai I 

,n qo from west to ea " ,d 

cross the h ween the two. where people 

live I'll see if I can detect sou.. sol the hybrids by 
field observation rhese are usually fairly tame birds, 
so if you are prudent and walk sli BW 

you approach and you can get good views 

I don i knowll I'll succeed I do know that the 
Chileai r-Mi.'d., ,di..lml central 

, hile with the country's southernmost pari iwouia 
,,,„.,, u,,,, H dgzags In between the two environ- 

™Co S uld you briefly describe some of the Othei 

proi< | , 

[haw d at other group 

, hern bee cl if. iwd.ng those of /\ 

| New Zealand i * c » 

tmilaritle 

leottne 

^IteoldmK'.n.sMlhi.dpi 

.1 many null" '9°- 

New Zealand, foi example sepai ..chunk 

about 50 i mill' m 

There..: e been birds common II these 

are. tevolution I ..is gone on for so 

.! V . "'■ 

,rd is very poor for older bit 

;ery recent bi "ig 

; 50.000 years Intermsol the majoi trends 
,„.„,. however. 50.000 years is t». 

drop In the bucket. 



Ruth Leibowltz is a writer and past editor of 
Rolun dci nan outer borough with two 

cats, a turtle, and teveral spiders. 



Education Department Programs 



Evening and Afternoon Lecture Series 



The Double- 
Edged Helix: 
Implications 
of the DNA 
Mystique 

Tuesday, May 2 

As research extends I nil 
understanding of the human 
genome and the genet u b 
,,! ,i r , as the media are 
appropriating genetic expla 
nations to convey a message 
, ij geneft essentlalism the 

idea ill- iality, behav- 

it n , and destiny can be at 
bributed to DNA 

Dorothy NeBdn will de 
saibe <!'<• revival ol genetii 
essentialism. drawing exam- 
ples from hundreds of stot 
reports, metaphors, and un 
age- 1 "ll' < led foi hei i><>ok 
,i„ /,;■, } uc //■».■ 

I ,,-neasa Cultural Icon 
win, 1 1 was i o written with 
hist isan I Indi 

N. 'II. n. will show how ideas 
from si lent e are used to 
serve s< hi. 'Ik I' " |(l 

Institutional agendas, and 
she'll examine whethi 

in 1 1 portends a new 
i 00 8:30 p.m 

$11 for Members. $12 for 

nil n Members. 

Spider Webs 

Two Wednesdays, 
May 3 and 10 

May 3 The I volution o) 

Spider Webs William A 
Shear, Biology Department 
i [ampden Sydney I College. 
May in How Stli kj 
de, Webs and Why? 
Brent Opell Departmenl ol 

Biology. Virginia I ei hnical 
Unr 7 00-8.30 p<" 

$18 foi Members $20 for 
non Members ($12 /or one 



Museum 
Mystery 
Theater: "The 
Mask of 

Suspicion" 

CANCELLED 

The Edw atlori I teparl 
rnent In i onjuni ft in with 
Manhattan Repertory Com- 
pany, presents a fascinating 
tale of distrust, apprehension, 
and evil. The Mask ol Suspl 
cion uses a classic Museum 
gallery to explore the tradi- 
tions and ( ulture of a fit tional 
tribe, the Northwest Coasl s 

Bell. i Mon Indians. 

An .mthropological and 
historical study reveals an 
ancient . iiemonial mask of 
the Bella Mon that endows 
the wearer with special pow- 
ers Some strange accidents 
have happened to people In 
ili.- gallery where the mask is 
displayed. Could the mask be 
responsible? A famous an 
thropologist will lecture on 
the origins of the Bella Mon 
masks and perhaps explain 



Some ol these l.i/.n.e .-.■eul •. 
A wine md-cheese reception 
is part of the intrigue. 
7.00-8:30 p.m. $22.50 for 
Members. $25 for non- 
Members. 

Workshops, 

Field Trips, 
and Walking 

Tours 

Spring Bird 
Walks in 
Central Park 

Observe the spring arrival of 
yrds in Central Park and learn 
how to identify birds by field 
marks, habitat, behavior, and 
song. Pre-registration is re- 
quire I I u, sdays. April 
■ I May 30. 7:00-9:00 a.m.. 
and Thursdays. April 6^June 
1, 9 00-1 TOO am $7 per 
walk or $50 for either series 
(no discount for Members) 
l \mlted h»25peoplr 

Field Trip to 
Sterling Hill 
Mine 

Saturday, June 3 

Vr.ii the last operating zinc 
mine 111 New tour 

underground tunnels .md 
leam about mining history 
and technology. Joseph I 
Peters, senior scientific assis- 
tanl In the Department of 
Mineral Sciences, leads this 

iting toUJ Bring your own 
box lunch. 930 am -5 00 
i> m. $50 (no discount for 
M« ' imited to 36 

people 

Bird 
Identification 

for the 
Beginner 

Saturday, May 13 

This workshop is designed 
i, , help the novice birder learn 
techniques of bird identifica- 
tion iik hiding chariu 

ording, and observation, 
u i no, ii iied Museum speci- 
mens that represent the vari- 
ety of birds in the New York 
area and move to Central 
Park for practical experience. 
This trip is led by Joseph 
DiCostanzo, research assis 
t.int on the Great Gull Island 
I 'i ■ iject and past president of 
the Linnaean Society. 10.30 
a m 3.00 p.m. $40 
[in. ludes a sandwich luni b; 
no discount for Members). 
I mined to 25 people. 



the marshlands and estuaries 
of Jamaica Bay Wildlife 
Refuge observes the spring 
migration of marsh and water 
birds, including herons and 
egrets. Naturalist Stephen C. 
Quinn leads the trip. Bring 
your own box lunch. 8:00 
am -5.00 p.m. Limited to 
36 people. $50 (no discount 
for Members) 



Birds of the 
Wetlands: A 
Day Trip to 
Jamaica Bay 

Saturday, May 6 

An all-day bus excursion to 



Geology 

Boat 

Cruises 

A Geology Cruise 

Around 

Manhattan 

Tuesday, June 6 

A three -hour boat trip 
around Manhattan surveys 
regional geology. Sidney S. 
Horenstein, coordinator of 
the Museum's environmental 
programs, will discuss the 
origins of the Palisades, plant 
and animal environments, 
and local history. Bring your 
own box supper 6 00-9:00 
p.m. $22 for Members. $25 
for non Members 



The Nooks and 
Crannies of 
Western New 
York Harbor 

Tuesday, June 13 

A three-hour boat tour 
travels south through the bay 
for unusual views of the 
Statue of Liberty and Ellis 
Island. Sidney S. Horenstein, 
coordinator of the Museum's 
environmental programs, will 
discuss the formation of the 
bays and other New York 
waterways. Bring your own 
box supper. 6:00-900 p.m. 
$22 for Members. $25 for 
non-Members. 



Exploring the 
Brooklyn Shore 
Line 

Saturday, June 10 

A five-hour boat trip cruises 
along the Brooklyn shore to 
view forts dating back to the 
War of 1812. Passengers will 
sail under the Verrazano Nar- 
rows Bridge, pass Gravesend 
Bay, and travel around Coney 
Island toward the Rockaway 
outlet. Sidney S. Horenstein, 
coordinator of the Museum's 
environmental public pro- 
grams, will comment on local 
history and ecology Bring 
your own box lunch; snacks 
are available on board 11 00 
a.m.-4:00 p.m. $32 for 
Members. $35 for non- 
Members. 



Cape Cod 
Whale Watch 
Weekend 

Friday-Sunday, 
May 19-21 

This nature weekend offers 
insights into Cape Cod's nat- 
ural and cultural history with 
three four-hour whale watch 
cruises by private charter, a 
guided birding walk along the 
trails of Wellfleet Bay Wildlife 
Sanctuary, and a stop at Mys- 
tic Aquarium. Fee includes 
transportation, two nights' 
lodging, meals, boat cruises, 
lectures, and admission to the 
bird sanctuary and aquarium 
$400 (double occupancy: no 
discount for Members) Lim- 
ited to 45 people. Call (212) 
769-5310 for itinerary. 

Fall Cape May 

Birding 

Weekend 

Friday-Sunday, 
October 20-22 

Join Museum naturalists for 
a weekend of birding at Cape 
May. New Jersey, one of the 
world's bird-watching hot 
spots. The trip will include 
naturalist-led walks, informal 
lectures, a stop at Brigantine 



National Wildlife Refuge, and 
two boat trips. Fee includes 
accommodations, food, and 
transportation $350 (double 
occupancy). Limited to 45 
people. Call (212) 769-5310 
for itinerary. 

Still Available 

Tickets are still available for 
the following programs. Call 
(212) 769-5310 for addi- 
tional information. 

Challenges of Gorilla 
Conservation. Thursday. 
April 6. 7 00-8.30 p.m. 
$12. 

Geology for Travelers. 
Tuesday, April 4. 7.00-8:30 
p.m. $12. 

Eight Unusual Northeast- 
ern Indian Lives Three 
Mondays. April 3-17, 
730-9:00 pm. $27 for 
Members. $30 for non- 
Members ($12 for one lec- 
ture.) 

Euenings with the 
Library's Special Collec- 
tions. Three Tuesdays. April 
4-18. 700-8:30 p.m. $27 
for Members. $30 for non- 
Members ($12 for one lec- 
ture). 

The Films of David Mac- 
Douqal Friday. March 31. 
and Saturday. April 1 , 
7 00-9:00 p.m. $18 for 
Members, $20 for non- 
Members. 



1995 REGISTRATION COUPON 

Please make check payable to the American Museum of 
Natural History and mail with a self-addressed, stamped 
envelope to: Lecture Series. Education Dept , American 
Museum of Natural History. Central Park West at 79th Street, 
New York. NY 10024-5192. 

Please note that credit-card payment is now available and 
that registration will be delayed if daytime phone number or 
stamped self -addressed envelope is not included. For further 
information call (212) 769-5310. 



ame:. 



Address: 



City: 



.State: Zip: 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: 



Course 



Day 



Hour 



.No. tickets Price (each) 



Total 



Course 



Day 



Hour 



_No. tickets Price (each) 



Total 



Total amount enclosed:. 



Method of payment: Check MC Visa 

Account no.: 



Expiration date:. 



8 



Unity Through Diversity 

World Myths and Religions 



The Department of Educa- 
tion's year-long scries Unity 

Through Diversity contrasts 
thccuihircsoftheNewVork 
City area. In recognition ol 
tlu . United Nations Year of 
Tolerance, the series World 
Myths and Religions exam- 
ines belief systems of the 
world through lectures and 
presentations of music, 
dance, and films 

For further information 
about these programs call the 
Education Department at 
(212)769-5315, Monday 
through Friday. 9:00 a.m. to 
5 00 p.m. The programs will 
take place in the Charles A. 
Dana Education Wing, on the 
first and second floors. 

The Power of Myth 
— and Religion 

Tuesday, April 4 

Joseph Campbell targeted 
myth as the aperture through 
which the inexhaustible ener- 
gies of the universe enter the 
human soul. According to 
Huston Smith, one of Camp- 
bells lifelong friends and 
colleagues, the same can be 
said of religion when it is alive 
and not just a dull habit. 
Smith will explore the similar- 
ities and differences between 
myth and religion, tracing 
their sources and prospects in 
I he coming century. 

Smith is the Thomas J. 
Watson professor of religion 
and distinguished adjunct 
professor of philosophy 
ementus at Syracuse Univer- 
sity and visiting professor ot 
religious studies at the Univer- 
sity of California, Berkeley. 
The program will take place 
at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Kaufmann Theater. 



Participants will elaborate on 
the role of mythology and 
other possibilities in viewing 
some of these questions from 
a multicultural perspective. 
Panelists: Rex Marshall 
Ellis, director of the office of 
museum programs at the 
Smithsonian Institution, 
James P. Carse. professor of 
religion at NYU: and Jolene 
Rikard. associate professor in 
the Department of Art His- 
tory and Art. University of 
Buffalo. Moderator. James J. 
Shields, Jr., professor and 
director of the Japan Initiative 
at City College. 

The program will take 
place in the Kaufmann The- 
ater at 7:00 p.m. 



Bali Myths: 
Culture, 
Image, and 
Reality 




Mythology as a 
Multicultural 

Bridge 

Tuesday, April 1 1 

In modem times people 
tend to turn to science for 
knowledge rather than to the 
myths and sacred texts of the 
past. This panel discussion 
examines whether it is possi- 
ble to use the past to explain 
the present or whether there 
are other available resources. 



These programs are pre- 
sented in conjunction with the 
exhibition /mages of Power 
and reflect its representation 
of Balinese myths and spin- 
tual activities 

Bali Film Series 

Sunday. April 9 

Filmmakers and anthropol- 
ogists from the United States. 
Australia, and Japan continue 
to be fascinated with the cul- 
tural life surrounding Balinese 
dance, trance, and deatrv 
This film series looks at the 
approaches filmmakers have 
taken in depicting Bali and its 
culture Films will be shown 
from 11 30 a.m. to 3:00 
p m. in the Kaufmann The- 
ater followed by a discussion 
of the films at 300 p.m. 
Introductory remarks: Mary 
Catherine Bateson, honorary 
chairperson of the Margaret 

Mead Film and Video Festi- 

U 30 am. Trance and 
Dance in Bali (Margaret 
Mead, Gregory Bateson^ Jane 
Belo. 1952. 22 mm.) These 
filmmakers were among the 
first to represent Bah on film. 
The film records the Balinese 

ceremonial kris (dagger) 
dance-drama, which depicts 
the never-ending struggle 



. . ., A., I. I u.rl., ( 'illlllOl 1 ' "' 



between the death-dealing 
and life-protecting spirits as it 
was performed in the village 
of Pagoetan in the late 

1930s. 

Noon Balinese Requiem. 
(Yasuhiro Omori, 1993. 63 
min.) This film traces the 
elaborate funeral rituals on 
the island of Bali, in which 
the recently deceased is 
wrapped in a shroud, buried, 
and later dug up for a cere- 
monial cremation All., one 
such ceremony, the film of- 
fers an intimate account of 
this custom and the ways in 
which death continues to bind 
the living 

1 00 p.m. Bali Beyond the 
Postcard (Peggy Stem with 
David Dawkins, 1991 60 
min.) Balinese art dance, and 
performance have spiritual 

and religious relevance and 
are integrated into everyday 
life. This film depicts the 
transmittal of traditional 
dance through four genera- 
tions of a family 

2-00 p.m. Done Bah. 
(Kerry Negara. 1993. 56 
min.) For nearly half a cen- 
tury Bali has been portrayed 
as an island paradise This 
film explores the creation ol 
this image and conveys a 
historical perspective on the 



island, including a Inokal ''" 
impact of Dutch colonization 
and the current role ol the 
Indonesian government 

| 00 pjn. toll's Images (a 
discussion of the fill' 
Speakers. Rachel Cooper, 
assistant dire. I- at th< Asia 
Society, and indepenck -ni 
filmmaker Meg McLagan 

Art and Religion in 
Bali 

Saturday, April 1 5 

The deities and demons of 

Balinese Hinduism and tern 

pie rituals are integrals all 

aspects of B 

llildredGeertz.curatoi ol me 
Images of Power exhlbil 
discusses the visible and imag 
malive realities of the artwork 
in , elation to Balinese rcli - 
qious traditions to, I. ,v 1 he 
program will take place in the 
Linder Theater at noon. 

Leonhardt People 
Center Programs 

April 15 and 16 

1 00 p.m Releasing th( 

Spirits A ViUow ' "-;<""" 
lit Bali (Timothy Asch. Patsy 



i kii I' 1 ' 10 

i | um. | rhese Wmmal 
i documented life on Ball 

,, decade In tin. him 

Ulagersln central 
Ball with limited flnani lal 

mumi.s pool then ..'soim 

carry oul a group cremation 
2 OOand 1:00 p.m Musk 
from Ardja Deed M 
Suarttlaksml oneol Ball 
mosi celebrated slng< i »nd 
composers ol fheop i 
dano hrmardja demon 

the complex musical. 

vocal, and rhythmh patt< 
ol tinging foi a 
Mantrl, the central charactei 
In legends 

I ; l() p in '-"'' 
nese Clown rmdltfona Kon 
Jc-nkuv lid.- talk on 

topeng..u 1 | ( .M/j ll ..'.tli.'vare 
formed at Balinese temple 

festivals. 

■ 10 and i 00 p.m 
Top, ng/BaHneae Mask< 
Theatei I Nyoman < 'tra, 
master of topeng maslMd 

dan.' wl11 

ena.i ih« togend Sklh ' k..iv-. 

lor) and tin masks of all Char 

acU ., ii.r.formoftopi'n.j 
... one BCtOI changes 

ate for afl the characters of 

,l l( . stony is called topeng 

pajegari 



■ 














Special 

John 
Burroughs 

Programs 



John Burroughs 
(1837-1921) was a leading 
literary critic and a pioneer in 
the new school of nature 
writing. The John Burroughs 



Association. Inc. presents 
programs and talks to pre- 
serve places associated with 

Burroughs' life and maintains 
Slabsides. the rustic cabin 

where he studied nature and 
wrote some of his essay. 

Annual Meeting and 
Award Ceremony 

The John Burroughs Asso- 
ciations annual meeting w,l 
take place on Monday April 
2 from 10 30 to 11 -45 a nv 
Tn the Leonhardt People Cen- 
ter. The meeting wi I be tot 
lowed by the annual lunch 



and book award ceremony, 
which will take place from 
noon until 2:00 p.m. in the 

Leonhardt People Centei 

The association, which was 
(ounded and is still based at 
the Amencan Museum wi I 
announce the awards for 
Sbdu eighth annual literary 
medal award competition f< - 
exceptionally fine nature wnt 

inq Awards will also be ■ - 
nounced for the sixth annual 

competition for the John 
Burroughs List of Na 
Books for Young Readers 
and the second annual com- 
petition for an Outstanding 



Published Natural History 
Essay 

Slabsides Day and 
Centennial Celebration 

Join the friends of the Jolm 

Burroughs Assoc ■ 

Saturday. May 2d fo 

centennial o AAXy 

,c i mi i I 

This special event 



which will begin 

d in honoi ol the 

cabin's one hundredth 

.HiMiversary. 

■.!, itedlnWesi 

Park New York, ontheHud 
Ki W r.80milesn".H.--l 
N.'w York( Hv md LO 
gOUth Of WngStOt] lornriore 

informa '» '" ' 



feseatervr-.a- 

B» ' ' ' ,..«TyTnj« 



£^ Fc.1— ■ -•> «»- •-" * •' l " d,B * 
./tan* 



Naturemax 



The IMAX film Africa: The 
Serengeti explores the rela- 
H on I,, ,,s between predator 
and prey by following the 
great migration of wilde- 
beests, zebras, and other 
animals Showtimes are 
in 30 and 11:30 a.m. and 
l |0 and I '.0 p.m. daily. 

Yelhwsh". lowers 

on a journey to the national 
park to discover its history, 
qeology. and wildlife. Show- 
times are 12 30, 2:30. and 
4.30 p.m. 



On Friday and Saturday at 
6:00 and 7:30 p.m. A/rica: 

The Serengeti is shown on a 
double bill with Yellowstone. 
Schedules and prices are 
subject to change without 
notice. Call (212) 769-5650 

for further information. 

Admission (Participating and 
Higher Members) 

Adults: $4 75 single fea- 
ture; $6 double feature 

Children: $2. 25 single 
feature- $3.25 double feature 



Cruising 
Norway's Coast 



There is no better way to 
I ie mostly coastal country 
of Norway than by sea. And 
no vessels see more Norwe- 
gian seacoast than the ex- 
press mail boats that provide 
vital contact for countless tiny 
h-hing villages and historic 
hamlets strung along 1.250 
miles of coastline. For more 
than 100 years. Norway's 
coastal steamers have carried 
mail, supplies, and passen- 
gers between the ancient city 
of Bergen and the North 
Cape town of Kirkenes. 

Now for the first i inic I I 
covery CruisesAours is offer- 
ing Arctic Dreams, a cruiM 
aboard one of these beloved 
mail boats, the MS Richard 
With. Although the sailing 
schedule is always dictated by 
local conditions and deliveries 
rather than passengers' con- 
venience, this voyage reveals 

A>orld of unrivaled beauty 
1 1 i,it can be seen in no other 
comfortable way. Hurtigruten, 
Norway*s mail boat system, is 
a lifeline for I he fishing vil- 
lages and small towns along 
the western coast. Wanned 
U i he Gulf Stream, this dra- 
matically beautiful coastline 
supports populations in areas 



that are accessible only by 
sea, some of them north of 
the Arctic Circle. The natural 
scenery along this route in- 
cludes stunning fjords carved 
by glaciers, lofty mountains, 
deep sea channels, dramatic 
islands, snow, and ice. The 
sun never sets for periods 
during the summer in these 
northern latitudes, and it casts 
a glow over the coastline s 
scenic splendor. 

The adventure begins with 
two nights in Oslo, followed 
by a train trip to Bergen. The 
coastal voyage consists of 

en days traveling north- 
ward from Bergen to 
Kirkenes. situated beyond the 
North Cape in Norway's 
largest county. Finnmark. In 
addition to planned shore 
excursions, regularly sched- 
uled lectures by AMNH spe- 
cialists will enrich the 
participants understanding 
Pnce (per person, double 
occupancy for the air/land/ 
cruise package): $5,400. For 
further information, call Dis- 
covery Cruises/Tours at (800) 
462-8687 or in New York 
State at (212) 769-5700, 
Monday through Friday, from 
9:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. 



DINOSAURS 
ARE THE LATEST 
THING FOR LUNCH! 

Come try DINER SAURUS, 

a fun-loving, fast service ealery that 
literally glows with neon dinosaurs! 

Featuring our 
MEAL-O SAURUS 

DINO SIPPERS 

DINO FRIES 

And our latest addition: 

LUCKY NICKEL 
BUFFALO WINGS 

Hours 11 am- 4 4f> pm ,MoD Sun. 
On lower level, nrxi to lh< Garden ( if 

DlNKRSAURt'S^ available 
(or birthday pai I 

contact our manager at 874-3131 



10 




Educational Forum 

The Endangered Species Act 

Thursday, April 13 
7:00 p.m. 

CANCELLED 



What do the peregrine 
falcon, piping plover, and 
bald eagle have in common t 
They are all endangered or 
threatened species living 
within New York City. 
Thanks to the federal Endan- 
gered Species Act. a land- 
mark law. these and other 
species are still with us. Learn 
about why keeping the act 
strong is critical, not only for 
animals and plants but also 
for the health of the environ- 
ment and ourselves. 

The panel discussion will be 
followed by a question-and- 
answer period. This free pro- 
gram, which will take place in 
the Under Theater, is spon- 
sored by the Endangered 
Species Coalition. Call (212) 
769-5750 for further infor- 
mation. 




From the Volunteer Department 



Volunteers Needed 

Expedition. Treasures 
from 125 Years of Discov- 
ery is well under way and is a 
great success for both the 
Expedition volunteers and 
the visiting public. There are 
still a few spaces left for vol- 
unteers Call Donna Sethi at 
(212) 769-5523 for addi- 
tional information. 

Festival of Life 
Saturday, April 8 

A team of Museum volun- 



teers will present a three- 
chapter overview of life on 
earth. These free tours are 90 
minutes long each. 

Chapter 1 "In the Begin- 
ning." Hear the story of the 
origin of the universe, the 
formation of earth, and the 
processes that led to life as 
we know it. 

Chapter 2: "Circle of Life." 
Travel our anthropology halls 
to learn how disparate cul- 
tures view and interpret life 

Chapter 3: "Basic Instinct." 



How do earth's inhabitants 
reproduce 9 We will conclude 
our story with the challenge 
confronting Homo sapiens. 
how to preserve and protect 
life for ourselves and future 
generations. 

Chapter 1 takes place at 
2:00 p.m., chapter 2 at 4:00 

p.m., and chapter 3 at 6:00 
p.m Call (212) 769-5566 to 
preregister. Tours are limited 
to 35 people, priority will be 
given to those who register 
for all three tours. 



Members 9 Birthday Parties 
at the Museum 



A new theme party offers 
young Members a chance to 
celebrate their birthdays 
within the arachnid world 
The Spiders' parties feature a 
guided tour of the Gallery 3 
exhibition and related games 
and craft activities — a unique 
way for young Members and 
their friends to celebrate 

Other theme parties for 
Members between the ages of 
5 and 10 focus on fossil 
mammals, dinosaurs, African 
mammals, reptiles and am- 
phibians, ocean dwellers. 



Native Americans, and min- 
erals and gems. In addition to 
Spiders'., another new theme 
party offers party-goers a 
look at one of the Naturemax 
films 

The group should be no 
fewer than 10 and no more 
than 20. The fee is $300 plus 
$15 per child and covers all 
materials and the services of a 
Museum party coordinator 



plan a party that suits your 
child's tastes and will handle 
everything from candles to 
party favors. All you need to 
do is bring the cake and help 
escort the guests. The parties, 
which are two hours long, are 
available only to Members at 
the Contributor ($100) and 
higher levels. 

For more information 
about the children's birthday 
parties call (212) 769-5542. 



The coordinator will help you 

The Membership Olfice would like to thank the following young Mem 
bers who celebrated the.r birthdays here recently: Constance Mousa 
Brett Caesar. Marv Kathenne Thinnes. Allegra Yeley, and Chnsta Minardi 



Parking 



The Museum's parking lot 
now offers expanded hours 
and revised rates. The park- 
ing lot is open every day from 
7:00 a.m. till 1 1 30 p.m. 

Rates for cars entering 



between 7:00 a.m. and 5:00 
p.m. start at $5 for up to a 
half-hour and advance by 
stages to a closing-time 
maximum of $17. Cars 
entering between 5:00 p.m. 
and 1 130 p m. are charged 
a minimum of $5 and a 
maximum of $7 on Sunday 
through Thursday and a 
maximum of $12 on Friday 



and Saturday. 

Buses are charged $11 
and are not admitted on 
weekends. 

The parking lot has a 
capacity of 100 vehicles and 
is operated on a first-come. 

first-served basis. 

Call (212) 769-5606 for 

information about alternative 

parking 





rs in Film! 



The current Gallery 3 exhibition ex- 
plores the world of spiders, and a re- 
lated program. Spiders in Film!, 
examines the accuracy of motion pic- 
tures in their portrayal of these arach- 
nids. A panel of scientists will comment 
on selections from documentaries and 
Hollywood films. 

This free program will take place on 
Saturday, April 1, from 1:00 to 3:30 
n m in the Under Theater. Call the Ed- 
ucation Department at (212) 769-5310 
for further information. 



Museum Notes 



Hours 

Exhibition Halls 

, -Thurs. & Sun 10:00 am -5:45 p m. 

Fri &Sat. 10:00 a.m.-8:45 p.m. 

The Museum Shop 

Mon.-Thurs. & Sun 10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

Fri. & Sat. 10:00 a.m.-7-.45 p.m. 

The Junior Shop 

Mon.-Fn 10:00 a m -4:45 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun. .10.00 a.m.-5:45pm 

The Museum Library ^ 

Tues.-Fri ..11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

The Natural Science Center 

For children of all ages and their families 
Closed on Mondays and holidays. ^^ ^ 

Saf&Sun'. '' 1:00-4:30 p.m. 
The Discovery Room 

Passes are distributed at the first-floor informa- 
tion desk beginning at 11.45 a.m. Ages 5-1 b 
Children must be accompanied by an adult. 
Closed on holidays and weekdays. 

Sat. & Sun Noon-4:30 p.m. 

Museum Dining 

Diner Saurus Fast Service Eatery A AC -„ m 

Daily .1100 a.m.-4:45 p.m. 

Garden Cafe 

Reservations: (212) 769 5865 

Lunch. Mon.-Fn 11;30 ?^?n n m 

Dinner: Fri. & Sat 5.00-7:M .m. 

Brunch. Sat. & Sun. 1 1 00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

Whale's Lair 



Fri. 



3:00-8 



00 p.m. 



W*' Noon-8:00 p.m. 

Sun. & most holiday, . Noon-5 00 p m. 

Snack Carts _ _ a r\r\ ^ ™ 

Sat.& Sun ll:00a.m.-4:00pm. 



Entrances . 

During Museum hours visitors can enter the 
building through the 77th Street entrance the 
parking lot entrance (81st Street) or the Roo- 
sevelt Memorial Hall entrance (/9th Street and 
Central Park West) Visitors attending pro- 
grams after hours can enter the bu.ld'ng 
at 79th Street and Central Park West. 



Happenings 
at the Hayden 




Public Forum on Near 
Earth Objects 

Tuesday, April 25 
8:00 p.m. 

How should society respond if a comet were 
discovered on a collision course with earth? Neil 
de Grasse Tyson, an astrophysicist with the 
Hayden Planetarium and Princeton University. 
will moderate a forum on near earth obje> I 
Panelists include the noted physicist and futurisl 
Freeman Dyson, of the Institute f< ced 

Study, asteroid impact specialist David Morrison 
of NASA, and other experts. 

The panel discussion will focus oi i 
potential threat to human survival after a major 
comet or asteroid collision with earth and offer 
ideas about avoiding such a catastrophe The 
program will conclude with a 30 minute 
question-dnd-answer session. 

Tickets are $10 for Members and $12 for 
non-Members Seating is limited Use the 
coupon below to order tickets, and for further 
information call (212) 769-5900 



Lectures 

Frontiers in Astronomy and 
Astrophysics 

On Monday. April 10. at 7:30 p.m.. Torrence 
Johnson, senior research scientist at the Jet 
Propulsion Laboratory, will present an illustrated 
talk. "The Galileo Mission to Jupiter. 

On Monday. May 8. at 7:30 p m Alex 
Filippenko. professor of astronomy at the Urn 
of California at Berkeley, will present an illustrated 
talk, "Exploding Stars — Celestial I ireworks. 
These lectures are part of the Frontiers in 
Astronomy and Astrophysics series. Tickets are 
$6 for Participating and Higher Members and $8 
for non-Members. For information about ticket 
availability and upcoming lectures, call (212) /< • ' 
5900. Use the coupon at right to order tickets. 

Sky Show 

The Ten Most-Asked 
Questions about the 
Universe 

What is a black hole? Is there life elsewhere In the 
universe? Does Planet X exist? An i UFOs red 
When is the best time to see the Northern Lights 
What is at the edge of the universe' How will the 
universe end? This Sky Show answers these and 
other frequently asked questions about spa. . 

Showtimes: 

Mon -Fri I 10 and 3:30 p m 

c-,, . 11 00 a.m. (except for Apnl 1 

and May 6), TOO, 2:00.3:00 4:00. 

and 5:00 p.m 

Sun: . . 1 :00. 200. 3:00. 4.00. and 500 p.m 

Admission (Participating and Higher Members) 

Adults $4 
Children (2-12): $2 

Call (212) 769-5100 for additional information 
and non-Members prices. Please note that prices 
are subject to change without prior n< »1 



Levy 9 comet strikes on Jupltei A 1:15 » il< 

model of the Space Shuttle O.b.ie, d< 

Hubble is on display along with a scale model ol 

the Optical Telescope Assembly of thi 

Space Telescope and a video of the repair mis 

of 1 '• 

Children's Shows 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers. Child* ilong with images of 

theii favorite Sesame Street Muppets as thev I 
about rainbows, the phases ol the moon. 
andstai H l. at 10:30 and 11 l a.m 

and Sal , May 6, at 10:30 o m Admission toi Par 
Hdpating and Higher Members is $4 foi adults and 
$2 for children Members can purchase up to iom 
tickets at the Members price 

Showsusually 9ellou1 In adv.i .■■>..u..n 

mail only, arenei >ui check livable 

to the Hayden Planetarium (attn W< mderful SI 
Central ParkWesI il 81s1 street. New York, NY 
10(» "" l 

a first and second choice of showl eto 

include a sell addi 

une teleph-'iK 1 number For additional 

rmatlon call (212) 

/w-bofs in Span' featun D •""' 

C 3PO- and has been i reated espe< lally f< n i hi! 

i ■ rogethei with a live ho 
famous space robots t. ike children on a tout ol 
universe. See how satellites and probes ths real 
spac , help us learn aboul worlds 

and far. Journey from the earth to othei plan 
and distant blackholi ; 6 at 1 1 

Admission foi Participating and Hlghei Memb 
$4I,„ adult i and $2 for children Foi information 
call (212] '00. 



Laser Light Shows 

Joumev Intoanothei dimension whi re lasei i 
alsand rocl musl< combine to create a dai 

rtencc ol Jlghl and d Showsare presented 

on Fridays and Saturd " llllllt,IHI 

p m i oi prii es and show schedule; teleph 

(212) J69 .100 



Public Forum on Near Earth Objects 

[uesdav April !5, 8 00 p.m 
Numbei ol Members Hi k< I al i L0 

(i tore than 4, please) — 

Number of non-Members Hi let at $ J 
I ,,i.,i amounl enclosed for program: — 



Lecture: The Galileo Mission to Jupiter' 

Mom 10 10 pin 

Number ol Members tit kets al $6 

(no more 1 1 «un 4. please): 

Numbei ol non-Members' Hi kets .it $8: 
Total amount enclosed for program: 

Lecture: "Exploding Stars — 
Celestial Fireworks" 

Monday, Ma m. 

Number ol Mi in i el ■•' *<> 

(no mon th.ii i I pleas*-) 

Numbei "I i Mi mix - Hi ! H: — 

Total amount enclosed for program: 



Name:. 



Address: 

— 



.State: 



ja p: . 



me telephone: 



Exhibition 



The Universe Revealed: Recent Images 
from the Hubble Space Telescope 

This exhibition features photographs of recent 
■veries made by the Hubble Space Tdesooj 
• M87 galaxy (which proves the exl 

tence of black holes) and images of the Shoemaker 



| Membership category: . j 

! Please make check payable to -I I layden | 
! Planetarium and mall With B self-addressed. ; 
! stamped envelope to Lcciur. H 

! Planetarium Central Park West al ; 

! New York. NY 10024 5 192. j 

i i 

! Please note that tlckel 

and cannot be pro '"' 

! telephone number and Stat 

Do not Include ticket requests or 
! checks for American Museum programs. 






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For Participating and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



Vol 20. No 5 May 1995 




Fine-line details are evident in this close-up 
of the back of a former state prisoner 



This tattoo was acquired after the wearer's girlfriend 
destroyed memorabilia from his 1 7-year prison boxing career 







Time dots, each of which represents one year in prison 

Prison Tattoos 



Complex tattooing on legs is unusual, even among inmates 



Tuesday, June 20 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$8 for Members, $12 for non 

According to the Book of Genesis 
God placed a mark on the world's first 
murderer before sending him into 
exile. The mark of Cain proclaimed its 
bearer as a criminal and social out- 
cast, and for centuries prisoners and 
other criminals were forcibly tattooed 
with numbers and other marks that 
made them easy to identify, locate, 
label, and isolate 

Today the vast majority of men 
behind bars in the United States are 
tattooed, most of them voluntas 
Chris Brady of the Idaho State Histor- 
ical Society will discuss the distinctive 
style and symbolism of prison tattoos. 



-Members 

which are significantly different in 
looks and meaning from other tattoos. 

For instance, prison tattoos aren t 
colorful. The designs are all black, and 
the wearers tend not to add color to 
them when they have the opportunity. 
The single-needle technique, which 
features fine lines and shading sets 
prison tattoos apart from outside work 
— although the style was imitated in 
the mid-1970s by outside tattoo 

art |nmates are skilled at reading each 
other's tattoos, which can tell them 
who to be friends with and who to 
stay away from or reveal the wearer s 



crime or the length of his sentence. 
(Only 5 p i US convicts are 

female; tattooing is not a common 
prison activity among them.) 

Like prisoi u kg members and 

enlisted men often sport tattoos. 
These three groups share certain 

neb senses of individ 
ual identity are taken away or less- 
ened, and they are deprived of the 
usual forms of self-expression. Cloth 
ing. activities, possessions, and rela- 
tionships are controlled by gang 

on. or military policy What the 
individual puts on his skin is a form of 
nonverbal communication for all to 



see. Within ti culture 

j nni ., thai i.iitoosare.i "i ual 

record ol thi ll U a sense 

■i -longing he recipi- 

ent can hand I' pain 

Chris Brad' " iil,n " 

tratoi 

Society, winch is located at Old Idaho 
Penitentiary. This program is pre- 
sented in cc> i 
nent exhibition on tattoon 

ing and clothing history, 

is working on a traveling exhibition 
Use the May Members' programs 
coupon on page 3 to regi 



Members' Adult-Child Workshop 

Native American Bead Weaving 



Sunday, May 21 

Parents and children can 
learn a traditional craft to- 
gether at a workshop on Na- 
tive American bead weaving. 
They'll find inspiration among 
the exhibits in the halls of 
Plains Indians and Eastern 
Woodlands Indians, where 
many of the displays include 
colorful beaded jewelry and 
other ornaments Then they II 
make a simple loom and 



learn weaving tei hniquCS. 
Participants will use seed 
beads to make earrings, 
bracelets, rings, and other 

jewelry 

The 90-minute workshop 
will be conducted by Carol 
Bowen, a museum educator 
at the Staten Island Children s 
Museum who has taught peo- 
ple of all ages for ten years at 

museums and public schools. 



The workshops, which are 
geared toward participants 
ages 8 and older, will take 
place at 11:00 a.m. and 1:30 
p m . Tickets are $26 per 
couple and available only to 
Participating and Higher 
Members Enrollment in this 
workshop is limited to 22 
couples. Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register; tickets are 
available only by mail. 



Collecting Fossils in the Sands of Mongolia 

F .IIo»l«|l ■" the Footsteps of Hoy Chapman Andrea,* 

Thursday, May 4 



Every year since 1990 

im the American 

Museum have worked ■ 
colleagues from the Mong 
lian Academy of Science 

exploring the Gobi's rich 
i hichare the 
source of many spectacular 
fossil finds Priscilla and Mal- 
,,,!,,, Mi Kenna will talk with 



Members about their experi- 
ences on a series of paleonto- 
logical expeditions in the 
Gobi Desert 

Malcolm McKenna. who is 
Frick Curator of Fossil Mam- 
mals in the Department of 
Vertebrate Paleontology, will 
discuss scientific aspects of 
the expedition, and Priscilla 



McKenna will talk about logis- 

navigation. camp life 
and the nomadic people of 

the Gobi. 

The program will take 
place at 7:00 pm. in the 
Kaufmann Theater. Tickets 
are $6 for Members and $9 
for non-Members. Use the 
coupon on page 3. 



Members 9 Walking Tour 
of a Manhattan Mosque 

Saturday, May 20 



Mi -ii i\> 1 5 < an take a guided 
tout of a Manhattan mosq 

i ["he mosque, 
which was completed in 
1991, was built by the Islamic 
Cultural Centei Foundation. 
hited Mustafa Abadan. 
, was the building's senior 
designer, will lead the tour 



of the mosques interior and 
offer an overview of its exte 

He'll begin with an intro- 
duction to Islamic architecture 
and describe the attempts to 
interpret traditional motifs 
within a modem-day urban 
( i mtext. 

The tour will take place 



from 11-.00 a.m. to 12:30 
p.m. Tickets are $20 and 
available only to Participating 
and Higher Members ages 16 
and older. Women should be 
sure to wear a head covering 
Use the coupon on page 5 to 
register; tickets are available 
only by mail. 



Spring Cruise on Long Island Sound 



Sunday, May 7 

Spend a spring afternoon 
speeding along Long Island 

nd on this Members 
cruise Participants will travel 
from the foot of Wall Street 
up the East River, through 
Hell Gate, and beneath the 
1 1 nogs Neck Bridge into the 
sound They'll view both the 
New York and Connecticut 



shorelines on the way to New 
Haven Harbor and back 

Sidney Horenstein, the 
Museum's coordinator of 
public programs, will host the 
cruise and point out land- 
marks along the way. He'll 
discuss the origins of the 
sound, the geology of the 
shorelines, and the history of 



some of the shoreline towns. 

The cruise will take place 
from noon to 4:00 p.m. Tick- 
ets are $55 for Members and 
$65 for non-Members. Bring 
a bag lunch; refreshments are 
available on board. Use the 
coupon on page 5 to register, 
and please note that tickets 
are available only by mail 



Last chance to see Images of Power 




The Gallery 77 exhibition 
Images of Power: Balinese 
Paintings Made for Gregory 
Bateson and Margaret Mead 
features 100 items collected 
by rhe anthropologists dur- 
ing their fieldwork in Bali 
during the 1930s. These 
paintings are strikingly 
different from traditional 
Balinese art forms and re- 
veal much about Bali that 
was previously unknown to 
Westerners. The exhibition is 
on display through May 3. 



Sexual Legacies 

How Ancient Gender Differences 

Influence Our Lives 

in the Office and the Home 



Thursday, May 1 1 




Why can't a man be more 
like a woman? Why can't a 
woman be more like a man? 
At the Members' program 
Sexual Legacies anthropolo- 
gist Helen Fisher will explore 
gender differences in behav- 
ior and the brain. 

Fisher will use slides to 
trace the evolution of 
male/female variations back 
to their origins among our 
hunting and gathering ances- 
tors on the grasslands of 
Africa some 4 million years 
ago. She'll explain how our 
modem Western myths 
about the genders emerged 
with the agricultural revolu- 
tion. Using these data on 
gender legacies. Fisher will 
offer an anthropological 
perspective on contemporary 
issues, including intimacy, 
sexuality, romantic love and 
infidelity, flirting and sexual 
harassment, communication 
styles, and gender tactics in 



business and family life SI 
conclude with several predic- 
tions about women, men, 
sex, and power in the coming 
decades. 

A research associate in the 
Department of Anthropology 
at Rutgers University. Fisher 
has written numerous schol- 
arly and popular articles and 
books. Her most recent book. 
Anatomy of Love. A Natural 
History of Mating. Marriage, 
and Why We Stray, was cho 
sen as a notable book of 1994 
by the New York Times and 
has been published in 16 
countries. She is host of the 
1995 four-part television se- 
ries. Anatomy of Love, which 
is based on this book. 

The program will take 
place at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Main Auditorium. Tickets are 
$7 for Members and $10 for 
non-Members. Use the May 
Members' programs coupon 
on page 3 to register 




ISSN 0194-6110 

Vol. 20, No. 5 
May 1995 

Donna Bell — Editor 

Sheila Greenberg — Manager of Membership Services 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Traci Buckner — Assistant Manager 

Robert Jahn — Program Coordinator 

Peter Zelaya — Special Projects Coordinator 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and Higher 
Members of the American Museum of Natural History is 
published monthly September through June, bimonthly July an 
August. Publication offices are at Natural History magazine 
American Museum of Natural History. Central Park West at 
Street. New York. NY 10024-5192. Telephone: (212) 76* 
5606. Subscriptions: $50 a year for Participating Membersn.p. 
$100 a year for Contributor Membership. 
© 1995 Amencan Museum of Natural History ^ cond . c ' a ^ ress 
postage paid at New York. NY Postmaster Please send add e 
changes to: Rotunda. Membership Office. Amencan Museum 
Natural History. Central Park West at 79th Street. New York. 
NY 10024-5192. 

in 
Printed by Waldon Press. Inc.. New York 



Seeing New 
York: History 
Walks for 
Armchair and 
Footloose 
Travelers 

Tuesday, June 27 
7:00 p.m. 
Kaufrnann Theater 
$5 for Members, 
$8 for non-Members 



Members can hear a fasci- 
nating account of New York's 
social history, architecture, 
and culture at the program 
Seeing New York: History 
Walks for Armchair and 
Footloose Travelers. Histo- 
rian Hope Cooke believes 
that many of us live like exiles 
in our own surroundings; to 
remedy this, shell take listen- 
ers off the beaten path to 
discover how social change 
has reworked New York's 
terrain. 

The program will be based 
on Cooke's book. Seeing 



New York, which is available 
from Temple Universi 
Press As if taking us by tin 
hand and conducting us from 
street to street."' remarked 
architectural writer Brendan 
Gill. Cooke evokes the 
sights and smells and sounds 
of all those earlier New 
Yorks Wherever 

leads us. we are happy to 
follow ." The book will be 
available for purchase at the 
program, and Cooke will sign 
copies after the show 

Use the coupon at right to 
register for the program. 




Carlota 

Santana 

Spanish 

Dance 

Company 

)j Thursday, June 8 
8:00 p.m. 
Main Auditorium 
$15 for Members, 
$20 for non-Members 



Carlota Santana 
and Manolo Rivera 



The passionate flamenco is 
the root of Spanish dance 
and the focus of a perfor- 
mance by the Carlota San- 
tana Spanish Dance 
Company. The company, 
which was founded in 1983 
with the mission of preserving 
traditional dance, combines 
5 flamenco with original chore- 
ography influenced by salsa 
and jazz. Spanish dance for 



this company is educational 
as well as entertaining, it's a 
way to break down cultural 
barriers with deep plies, open 
arms, expressive movements, 
and new rhythms. 

Their repertoire will em- 
brace the varied styles of 
Spanish dance from classical 
to folkloric to flamenco. From 
the sounds of the classical 
music of Albeniz to the gypsy 
chants of the cante jondo 
(deep song), the company 
portrays the roots of Spanish 
music and dance, which have 
had a great influence on the 
music of the Americas 

Touring with six to eight 
dancers and musicians, the 
ensemble has appeared to 
great critical acclaim on major 
dance stages throughout the 
United States, including the 
Joyce Theater in New York 
City, Albany's Empire State 
Performing Arts Center, the 
Schubert Theater in Con- 
necticut, and many others. 
Use the May Members' pro- 
grams coupon at right to 
register. 



Pueblo Myths 

For adults 

Friday, June 16 

7:00 p.m. 

Under Theater 

$8 for Members, $12 for non-Members 

For children, ages 7-12 

Saturday, June 17 

11:00 a.m. 

Edith C. Blum Lecture Room 

$10, and open only to Participating and 

Higher Members' children (no adults) 






Many years ago in a small 
Indian community in New 
Mexico, a grandmother and a 
girl would pass the time of 
day in the trading post where 
the girl worked. On cold 
mornings they would have a 
cup of tea in front of the 
store's potbellied stove, and 
the grandmother would talk 

It is important to list* 
she told the girl. "You find 
the time to listen 1 am old. 
few listen to old people 
These stories are important, 
so someone should listen and 
remember so all is not lost 
The girl listened, and the 
grandmother shared the oral 
legacy of generations of story- 
tellers. Today Teresa Pijoan 
tells others the stories she first 
heard in San Juan Pueblos 
trading post — tales of magic 



and faith, creation and regen- 
eration The storytelle"r/au- 
thor will come to the Museum 
next month to present two 
Members programs, an 
evening show for adults and 
a morning program for chil- 
dren, in which she'll relate 
some of the enchanting 
myths of New Mexico's native 
Tewa people 

At the program for adults, 
Pijoan will perform the cre- 
ation myth of Awonawilona 
with her face painted in two 
shades -half in black (repre- 
senting Father Sky), and half 
In white (for Mother Earth). 
She'll also tell a Tewa story 
(from Taos and Picuris 
Pueblo). "Nah-chu-ru-chu 
Keeps Moon Woman, and 
a Spanish Pueblo tale called 
EI Angel del Alcalde, the 



humorous story of a young 
woman who marries an older 

man. 

At the children's program. 
Pijoan will tell the Iroquois 
tale "The Hying Head"; a 
creation myth. 'The Shot i 
Story Ever Told"; and "Ah- 
ha-a uu-Tah and the Cloud 
Eater " The program will 
include movemei ise, 

and total group participation. 
Children will learn to speak 
some Tewa words, use Indian 
Sign Language, greet in the 
traditional Pueblo way, and 
learn to be a "storyholder." 

Each program is appi 
mately one hour long. Use 
the coupon at right to re 
for the adults' program Tick- 
ets for the children's program 
are available only by mail; use 
the coupon on page 5. 



May Members' 
Programs Coupon 



Name; 



Address: 



■ 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category:. 



Total amount enclosed:. 



State 



.Zip:. 



Please make check dt applicable) payable to the American 
Museum of Natural H ind mall with a pell- 

addressed, stamped envelope to: May Memb 
grams, Membership Office, American Museum of NaturaJ 
History. Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 
10024 5192 Telephone reservations are not accep- 
ted. No refunds or exchanges. 

Unless otherwise indicated, no more than eight 
tickets may he ordered for a program. Partici- 
pating Members are entitled to four tickets per 
program at the Members' price. Higher Members 
are entitled to six tickets, and Associate Members 
are entitled to one ticket. 

Collecting Fossils In the Sands of Mongolia 

Thursday, May 4, 7 00 p.m 

Numbei ol Members' tickets at $6: — 

Number of additional lii kets at $9: — 

Total amount enclosed for program: — 

Sexual Legacies. Thursday May 11. 7 00pm 

Number of Memb ts at $7-. 

Numberofaddition.il Hi kets al $10: — 
Total amount i ucloscd for program: — 

Seismosaurus: The Earth Shaker 

Wednesday. May 24 7:00 p.m 
Number ol Members ti< kets at $8-. — 
Number of additional ti< I '12.: — 

i.il amount etu li isei I lor program: — 

The Jews of Yemen. Tuesday, May 30 1 00 p.m. 

Number ol Members* tickets at $7: — 

Number of additional Hi kets al &10 _ 

i.il amount enclosed for program: — 

Dinosaurs Today. Thursday lune 1 /00 p.m. 
Number of Members' tickets at $6: — 
Number of addition, >l il $0: — 

Total amount enclosed for program: — 

Dino Rock. Saturday. June 3 Please indicate a flrsl and 

second choice. 

11:30 am _l:30p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $6: — 
nber of additional Hcki ' — 

Total amount enclosed for program: — 

Spanish Dance. Thursday. June 8. 8:00 p.m 
Numbei ol Members Hi kets al $15: — 
Number of addition.il ft kets al $20: — 
Total amount enclosed for program: — 

Pueblo Mythe (for adults) Friday June 16, 7:00 p.m 
Number of Members' I — 

Number of addition.il Hi kets at $12: — 
Total amount enclosed for program: — 

Prison Tattoos. Tuesi la v June 20 7:00 p.m. 
Number of Membei Hcketsal &8: — 
Number of additional tick 12 _ 

1 1 ital amount enclosed for program _ 

Seeing New York. Tuesday, June 27, 7:00 p.m. 
Number tsat $5: — 

Number of additi. ■ — 

Total amount enclosed for program — 

NOTE Orders received less than ten days before 
show dates will be held for pick-up at the door on 
the day of the program if tickets are still available; 
If an event is sold out, you will be advised in writing 
or by phone and your check will be returned. 



Education Department Programs 



Evening and Afternoon Lecture Series 




Birds of the Wetlands 



The Double- 
Edged Helix: 
Implications 
of the DNA 
Mystique 

Dorothy Nelkin will de- 
scribe the revival of genetic 
essentialism. drawing exam- 
ples from hundreds of stories, 
reports, metaphors, and im- 
ages collected for her book 
The DNA Mystique: The 
Gene as a Cultural Icon, 
which was co-written with 
historian Susan Lindee. 
Nelkin will show how ideas 
from science are used to 
serve social ideologies and 
institutional agendas, and 
she'll examine whether ge- 
netic research portends a new 
eugenics. Tuesday, May 2, , 
7 00-8:30 pm $11 for 
Members, $12 for non 
Members. 

Wonders of New York 
Fossils 

This two-part series is pre- 
sented by Sidney Horenstein, 
coordinator of environmental 
public programs. 

May 2: Metro Fossils. The 
Greater New York area has 
yielded some fascinating fos- 
sils. This lecture examines the 
Museum's "expeditions" and 
other efforts that unearthed 
local fossils. 

May 9- Building Stone 
Fossils Manhattan has a 
treasure trove of naturalized 
fossils entombed in the gleam 
ing lobbies of office buildings. 
the facades of high-rise tow- 
ers, table tops, and restroom 
partitions. This lecture ex- 
plores where to find them and 
how to interpret them 
7:00-8:30 p.m. $18 for 
Members, $20 for non-Mem- 
bers ($12 for one lecture). 

Spider Webs 

May 3. The Evolution of 
Spider Webs. William A. 
Shear, Biology Department, 
Hampden-Sydney College. 

May 10: How Sticky Are 
Spider Webs and Why? 
Brent Opell. Department of 
Bi< ili >qv, Viiqiniti I >'. Iiuical 
University. 7.00-8:30 p.m. 
$18 for Members. $20 for 
i ion Members ($12 for one 
lecture). 

The Day Before 
America 

In his newly published book 
The Day Before America: 
Changing the Nature of a 



Continent William H. Mac- 
Leish contends that many 
Americans have no sense of 
how their landscapes have 
been formed and transformed 
over time. At this lecture he'll 
place these transformations in 
full context, from their begin- 
nings to their probable future. 

The author of Oil and 
Water: The Struggle for 
George Band and The Gulf 
Stream, which was adapted 
foi the PBS program Nova, 
MacLeish is a contributing 
editor of ECO and former 
editor of Oceanus. Monday, 
May 8. 7.00-8.30 p.m. $11 
for Members, $12 for non- 
Members. 

Workshops, 
Field Trips, 
and Walking 
Tours 

Spring Flowers and 
Trees in Central Park 

A two-hour morning walk 
in Central Park observes 
botanical signs of spring. 
Participants will explore 
Strawberry Fields, Herns- 
head, and the Shakespeare 
Garden and learn about plant 
identification and ecology 
from William Schiller, lecturer 
in botany in the Education 
Department. 

Please note. Walks will start 
from the park entrance at 
72nd Street and Central Park 
West. Please register at least 
one week in advance. Satur- 
day, May 6, 9.00-1 1:00 
a m SOLD OUT. 

Spring Bird Walks in 
Central Park 

Observe the spring arrival 
of birds in Central Park and 
learn how to identify birds by 
field marks, habitat, behavior, 
and song. Pre-registration is 
required. Tuesdays, May 2- 
30. 7:00-900 a.m.. and 
Thursdays, May 4-June 1, 
9.00-1L00 a.m. $7 per 
walk (no discount for Mem 
bers). Limited to 25 people. 



Field Trip to Sterling 
HiU Mine 

Visit the last operating zinc 
mine in New Jersey, tour 
underground tunnels, and 



leam about mining history 
and technology. Joseph J. 
Peters, senior scientific assis- 
tant in the Department of 
Mineral Sciences, leads this 
exciting tour. Bring your own 
box lunch. Saturday, June 3. 
930 a.m.-5 00 p m. $50 
(no discount for Members). 
Limited to 36 people 

Bird Identification for 
the Beginner 

This workshop is designed 
to help the novice birder leam 
techniques of bird identifica- 
tion, including charting, 
recording, and observation. 
View mounted Museum speci- 
mens that represent the vari- 
ety of birds in the New York 
area and move to Central 
Park for practical experience. 
This trip is led by Joseph 
DiCostanzo, research assis- 
tant on the Great Gull Island 
Project and past president of 
the Linnaean Society. Satur- 
day, May 13, 10.30 a.m.- 
3.00 p.m. $40 (includes a 
sandwich lunch, no discount 
for Members). Limited to 25 
people. 

Birds of the Wetlands: 
A Day Trip to 
Jamaica Bay 

An all-day bus excursion to 
the marshlands and estuaries 
of Jamaica Bay Wildlife 
Refuge observes the spring 
migration of marsh and water 
birds, including herons and 
egrets. Naturalist Stephen C. 
Quinn leads the trip. Bring 
your own box lunch. Satur- 
day. May 6, 8.00 a.m- 
5.00 p.m. Limited to 36 
people. $50 (no discount for 
Members). 

Geology 
Boat Cruises 

A Geology Cruise 
Around Manhattan 

A three-hour boat trip 
around Manhattan surveys 
regional geology. Sidney S. 
Horenstein, coordinator of 
the Museum's environmental 
programs, will discuss the 
origins of the Palisades, plant 
and animal environments, 
and local history. Bring your 
own box supper. Tuesday, 
June 6, 6:00-900 p.m. $22 
for Members. $25 for non- 
Members. 

The Nooks and 
Crannies of Western 
New York Harbor 

A three-hour boat tour 
travels south through the bay 
for unusual views of the 
Statue of Liberty and Ellis 
Island. Sidney S. Horenstein, 
coordinator of the Museum's 
environmental programs, will 
discuss the formation of the 
bays and other New York 
waterways. Bring your own 
box supper. Tuesday, June 
13, 6:00-9:00 p.m. $22 
for Members, $25 for non- 
Members. 



Exploring the 
Brooklyn Shore Line 

A five-hour boat trip cruises 
along the Brooklyn shore to 
view forts dating back to the 
War of 1812. Passengers will 
sail under the Verrazano Nar- 
rows Bridge, pass Gravesend 
Bay, and travel around Coney 
Island toward the Rockaway 
outlet. Sidney S. Horenstein, 
coordinator of the Museum's 
environmental public pro- 
grams, will comment on local 
history and ecology. Bring 
your own box lunch; snacks 
are available on board. Satur- 
day, June 10, 1100 
a.m.~4:00 pm. $32 for 
Members, $35 for non- 
Members. 

Cape Cod Whale 
Watch Weekend 

This nature weekend offers 
insights into Cape Cod's nat- 
ural and cultural history with 
three four-hour whale watch 
cruises by private charter, a 
guided birding walk along the 



trails of Wellfleet Bay Wildlife 
Sanctuary, and a stop at Mys- 
tic Aquarium. Fee includes 
transportation, two nights' 
lodging, meals, boat cruises, 
lectures, and admission to the 
bird sanctuary and aquarium 
Friday-Sunday. May 19-21. 
$400 (double occupancy, no 
discount for Members). Lim- 
ited to 45 people. Call (212) 
769-5310 for itinerary. 

Fall Cape May Birding 
Weekend 

Join Museum naturalists for 
a weekend of birding at Cape 
May, New Jersey, one of the 
world's bird-watching hot 
spots. The trip will include 
naturalist-led walks, informal 
lectures, a stop at Brigantine 
National Wildlife Refuge, and 
two boat trips. Fee includes 
accommodations, food, and 
transportation. Friday-Sun- 
day, October 20-22, $350 
(double occupancy). Limited 
to 45 people. Call (212) 
769-5310 for itinerary. 




Cape Cod Whale Watch Weekend 

1995 REGISTRATION COUPON 

Please make check payable to the American Museum of 
Natural History and mail with a self-addressed, stamped 

envelope to: Lecture Series, Education Dept., American 
Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, 
New York, NY 10024-5192 

Please note that credit-card payment is now available and 
that registration will be delayed if daytime phone number or 
stamped, self-addressed envelope is not included. For further 
information call (212) 769-5310. 



Name:. 



Address: 
City: 



.State: 



:. p: . 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: 



Course 


Day 


Hour 


No. tickets 


Price (each) 


Total 


Course 


Day 


Hour 


No. rirkpK 


Pricp (parh) 


Total 



Total amount enclosed: 



Method of payment: Check MC Visa 

Account no.: 



Expiration date:. 



Month/Year 



The Jews of 
Yemen 

Tuesday, May 30 
7:00 p.m. 
Main Auditorium 
$7 for Members, 
$10 for non-Members 

For centuries the Jews of 
Yemen enjoyed freedom and 
prosperity But with the sui- 
cide of the last Jewish king — 
according to legend he rode 
his horse into the sea — and 
the increasing power of Islam, 
Yemenite Jews were stripped 



of their land, forbidden to 
farm, and confined within 
small areas of villages and of 
the capital of Sanaa. In the 
crowded ghetto of Sanaa. 
Yemenite Jews created a 
style of architecture known 
nowhere else in the Middle 
East They did the only work 
allowed them — that of arti- 
sans — becoming skilled 
silversmiths, coppersmiths, 
weavers, woodworkers, and 
masons. 

Between 1948 and 1950 
large numbers of Yemenite 
Jews emigrated to Israel. 
Little was known about those 
who remained behind. In 
Jews of Yemen. A Vanish- 



ing Culture, filmmaker 
Johanna Spector takes the 
viewer to Yemen and the few 
Jews remaining in Haidan. in 
north Yemen, however, all 
customs and ceremonies are 
filmed in modern Israel where 
Yemenite Jews continue to 
practice their old traditions 
The film includes footage 
of traditional Yemenite cele- 
brations, rituals dances, and 
music. Spector's camera 
enters the homes of several 
Yemenite families as they 
celebrate the Passover Seder 
in ways that are unique to 
Yemenite Jews but differ 
from region to region in 
Yemen. 






Seismosaurus: The Earth Shaker 



Wednesday, May 24 
7:00 p.m. 
Kaufmann Theater 
$8 for Members, 
Si 2 for non-Members 



The newest and largest 
dinosaur to be added to the 
ranks of the Mesozoic giants 
is Seismosaurus hallorum 
from the Morrison Formation 
(Upper Jurassic) of New Mex- 
ico. Paleontologist David 
Gillette will talk with Members 
about this prehistoric behe- 
moth, which is the longest 
dinosaur ever discovered (an 
estimated 150 feet) and per- 



haps the largest, too — it's 
thought to have weighed 100 
tons, or the weight of 20 
average elephants. 

Seisomosaurus represents 
the pinnacle of success of the 
massive sauropods, which 
reached their greatest diver- 
sity in the Jurassic and then 
suffered near-extinction at the 
Jurassic-Cretaceous bound- 
ary, the Sauropod Crisis. Its 
excavation involved the use of 
high-tech instruments to look 
for the bones underground. 
More than 240 stomach 
stones (gastroliths) were exca- 
vated with the skeleton, indi- 
cating that sauropods had 
both crop and gizzard as spe- 
cialized chambers of the di- 



gestive tract. 

Gillette became state pale- 
ontologist of Utah in 1988 
after serving for five years as 
the curator of paleontology at 
Albuquerque's New Mexico 
Museum of Natural History, 
where he initiated the Sel 
mosaurus Project. He is also 
the chief scientist for the 
Southwest Paleontology 
Foundation. Inc., which spon- 
sored the Seismosaurus Pro- 
ject, and consultant scientist 
at Los Alamos National Labo- 
ratory, where much of his 
research in technological 
applications was conducted. 

Use the May Members 
programs coupon on page 3 
to register. 



Dinosaur Days Are Here Again 



It's been a mighty long time 
since Tyrannosaurus rex 
has had any visitors. The 
Museum's dinosaur halls have 
been closed since 1991 so 
that an extensive renovation 
and restoration program 
could be undertaken. Since 
then T. rex has been com- 
pletely disassembled, cleaned, 
conserved, and repositioned 
— as have the other famous 
dinosaurs They'll be ready 
for company next month, 
when Members can celebrate 
their return. 

Members' Preview 

On Thursday. June 1, from 
4:00 to 9:00 p.m. Participat- 
ing and Higher Members can 
attend a preview of the new 
halls. Volunteer Highlights 
Tour guides will be on hand 
to talk about the exhibits and 
answer questions No tickets 
are necessary for this free 
preview, your valid member- 
ship card is your ticket of 
admission. 

Dinosaurs Today 

On the evening of the pre- 
view paleontologist Mark 
Norell will talk about the de- 
sign of the two new dinosaur 
halls and the ways in which 
they reflect the latest 
advances in scientific under- 
standing of dinosaur life 
Norell, who is a curator in the 
Department of Vertebrate 




Yemenites praying before departure to Israel 

The Jews of Yemen pre- 



il the Museum In 
1986. Filmmaker Joh. u 
Spector, who is an au 
on Yemenite music, will Intro- 
duce the 78-minute film and 
answer questions after its 



screening This program is 
two hours long and the fourth 
in a series of Spector ethno 
graphic films. 

Use Hi*' May Members 
programs coupon on pag< I 

reglstei 




Apatosaurus (formerly 

Paleontology, was instrumen- 
tal in the preparation of the 
new halls, and hell explain 
how their design traces evolu- 
tionary history and the inter- 
relationships among 
vertebrates. 

Dinosaurs Today will take 
place at 7.00 p.m. in the 
Kaufmann Theater Tickets 
are $6 for Members and $9 
for non-Members Use the 
coupon on page 3 to register 

Dinoday 

Young Members can wel- 
come back the dinosaurs on 
Saturday. June 3. at Dmo- 
day. Musician Chris Rowland 
will present Dino Rock a 
fast-paced and fun-filled pro- 
gram of song and dance. 
Before or after Dino Rock 



called BrontosaurusJ 

kids can participate in a crafts 
workshop, at which they'll 
make a dinosaur memento to 
take home, and they can play 
Dinosaur Bingo. 

Tickets for Dinoday are 
$15 and available only to 
Participating and Higher 
Members ages 4 and older. 
Dino Rock will take plao 
the Kaufmann Theater at 
1 i JO a.m. and 1:30 p m 
(Members wishing to register 
for Dino Rock only can do 
so; tickets are $6 each ) The 
crafts workshop and Dinosaur 
Bingo will be held at 10: 30 
an. and 1230 and 2.30 
p.m Use the coupon on tl 
page to register for Dinoday 
and the coupon on page 3 to 
register for Dino Rock only. 



Members' Birthday Parties 
at the Museum 



A new theme party offers 
young Members a chance to 
celebrate their birthdays 
within the arachnid world 
The Spiders! parties feature a 
guided tour of the Gallery 3 
exhibition and related games 
and craft activities — a unique 
way for young Members and 
their friends to celebrate. 

Other theme parties for 
Members between the ages of 
5 and 10 focus on fossil 
mammals, dinosaur Afrii an 
man ii i ials reptiles and am- 
phibians ocean dwt 11 
Native American-, and mln 
erals and gems. In addition to 
Spiders', another new theme 
party offers | 
look., i oneol the Naturemax 



films. 

rhe group should be no 
fewer than 10 and no more 
th.ui 20. The fee is $300 plus 
$15 per child and cov. in all 
materials and the services of a 
Mm ..inn party i oordinatoi 
The coordinator will help you 
plan a party that suits youi 
child's ta I will handle 

everything from candles bo 
part '' '" 

do is bring t). 
c-s.orl the guests rhe pai 
which .ire two hours k rnfl 
available only to Members at 

the Contribute l$10i» „,.i 

highei levels 
For more Information 

about lb.-. hJfdren ■■ bin* 

parties call (21 2) 7" 



The Membership) iffta would like to than* lha follov 
Men.' thelrblrthd 

Molly immyMatheu I i '1 « 

i Schaffer. Beni.in 






Tours. Day Trips, and Workshops. Us, this COU] 

to register for Nu u i ri Bead Weaulng (Indli 

first and second choice of times) the Walking Your o) a 
Manhattan Mosqu. i. Dino day. the children im 

Pueblo Myths, and the Members' Cruise on Long I 
Sound. 



Name(s) of program(s): 



Number of tickets and price (please indicate which pro- 
gram if more than one): _ ■ 



Total amount enclosed:. 



Name: 



Address: 
City: 



-State 






Daytime telephone:. 



Membership category: - 

Please make check payable to the American Museum of 
Natural History and mail with a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to Yours and Workshops 
Membership Office. American Museum of Natural 
j Park West at 79th Street. New York. NY 
10024-5192 



Unity through Diversity 

World Myths and Religions 



The Depart ment of Educa- 
te in s year-long series Unity 
through Diversity contr.. 
the cultures of the New York 
City area In recognition of 
the United Nations" Year of 
[tolerance the scries World 
Myths and Religions cxam- 
,,„.. belle! systems ol the 
world through music, dance, 
and films. 

For further information 
about these programs, call 
the! ducatlon Department at 
(212)769-5315. Monday 
through I rlday, 9:00 a.m. to 
p.m. The programs will 
take place in the Charles A 
Dana Educa I Ion Wing, on the 
lust and second floor 



Russian Village Folk 
Celebration 
Saturday, May 6 

Arts International, Institute 



ol International Education, 
and producer David Eden 
present an ensemble of 27 
dancers, singers, and musi- 
, | a ns in ■) rich and spirited 
performance of Russian folk 
traditions representing three 
different regions and span- 
ning three generations. 

Russian religion is marked 
by a nation of Chi 

tianity with worship of the 
ancestors, the sun. and the 
earth. These elements of 
religious folk culture are re- 
flected in the performances 
The Grandmothers of Cher- 

, o sing soulful courtship 
and wedding songs from the 
northern Arkhangelsk region 
The Old Believers, who were 
exiled to Siberia in the seven- 
teenth century for refusing to 
accept Russian Orthodoxy s 
reforms will perform songs. 
t.nry tales, and legends. A 
group from the Voronezh 



region will depict the living 
traditions of their ancestors 
through mime and dance 

The performance, which 
will be accompanied by En- 
glish narration, will take place 
at 6:30 p.m. in the Hall of 
Ocean Life. It will be followed 
by a discussion, Russian Reli- 
gious and Community Tra- 
ditions, at 8:00 p.m. in the 
Kaufmann Theater. Panelists 
include Elizabeth Valkenier 
resident scholar at the Harn- 
man Institute at Columbia 
University: Elvira Kunina. 
director of the All-Russian 
Folk Arts Division of the Min- 
istry of Culture;, and Irina 
Asadchik, director of the Folk 
Center of the Arkhangelsk 
Region. They will discuss 
regional cultural and spiritual 
beliefs, and their explanations 
will feature short demonstra- 
tions by the performing 
artists. 



From the 

Volunteer 

Department 

Volunteers Needed 

Expedition Treasures 
from 1 25 Years of Discov- 
ery is well under way and Is a 
great success for both the 
Expedition volunteers and 



the visiting public. There are 
si ill spaces left for volunteers. 
Call Donna Sethi at (212) 
769-5523 for additional in- 
formation. 



A Global Expedition: 
World Tour 3 

On Saturday, May 13, the 
Volunteer Office's third an- 
nual World Tour will focus 
on the Museum's exciting 
heritage of world exploration. 



Over the past 125 years this 
institution has sent represen- 
tatives to every comer of the 
globe, and the World Tour 
will retrace the steps of some 
of these explorers and scien- 
tists to look at exhibits that 
reflect the achievements of 
these expeditions. 

The free tour begins at 
6:30 p.m. in the second-floor 
Roosevelt Rotunda. Registra- 
tion is required, and the tour 
is limited to 35 people. Call 
(212) 769-5566 to register. 



Expedition Cruise to Iceland, Greenland, 
and Hudson Bay 



This summer, from August 
9 to 25. a team of lecturers 
from the American Museum 
will lead a voyage of discovery 
from Iceland, one of the 
youngest and most geologi- 
cally active places in the 
world, to the geologically 
.mi hiii island of Greenland 
and to Hudson Bay. one of 
the mosl Importai • in 

th( I nstory of exploration. 
The expedition ship Alia 
Tarasovo will lollow routes 
once sailed by Vikings and 
Arctu explori ike par- 

ik [pants i" an< lent Norse and 
I hule villages built on flower- 
ing tundra amid inaiestk 
mountain landscapes 

During the summer months 
the frigid seas of northern 
Canada and Greenland i 
plode with life as resident and 
migratory wildlife enjoy a 
brief respite Polar bears 
emerge from theft dens 
and walruses l< lunge on ice 
floes, caribou and musk oxen 
graze on fresh summer 
grasses, and a host of whales, 
seablrds h id other wildlife 
gorge themselves in prepara- 



tion for the long winter. 

The region's history of 
human habitation includes 
that of Inuit peoples who 
migrated across the Ice Age 
land bridge from A 
adapted themselves to life in 
the frigid is well as 

thai of the Vikings who set 
out in open boats from Scan- 
dinavia, and later explorers 
who risked everything in 
search oi the Northwi il Pas 
sage. 

During the course of the 



voyage a complete program 
of lectures and videos will 
cover such topics as polar 
exploration, arctic flora and 
fauna, and the art forms of 
the Hudson Bay region. 

Price (per person, double 
occupancy: airfare additional). 
$6.990-$7.990. For further 
information, call Discovery 
Caiises/Tours at (800) 462- 
8687. or in New York State 
ci (212)769-5700. Monday 
through Friday, from 9:00 
a in until 5 00 p in 




The Old Believers perform on May 6 



Support lor Eduction Department programs 
u made possible bv gtftl •»•' 9'-"> l * , """ a,as * 

i., i, Bank. Ctiemk-al Hirik ( 
Citibank. Henrv Nias Foundation. Inc.. Jack and 
Susan Rudin Educational and Scholarship I und Um 
Ula AcJicson Wallace Fund at the New York 



i.itv Trust, Samuel and May Rudin 

■lion, 

|| ,n. ill.- Vid.l.i 
foundation, Willum Randolph Heanl Found* 
ind tlw family ol Frederick H Leonhardi 



Discovery Room Parent-ChUd Workshop 

Insects 

Saturday, May 6 
10:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. 
$35 per couple 




Discovery Room exhibitor 
Ian Stark (age 12) and his 
father Julian, a Museum ento- 
mologist, will lead an insect 
collecting trip to Central 
Park The morning field trip 
will be followed by a session 
in the Museum that will 
demonstrate how to prepare 
insects for a collection. 

Ian is a junior naturalist at 
the Discovery Room, the 
Museum's hands-on room for 
children and their parents. 
Participants in this workshop 



will meet at the Roosevelt 
statue on the Central Park 
West steps and should bring a 
picnic lunch to eat in the 
park. 

The workshop is limited to 
10 couples: one child (ages 7 
and older) plus one adult Pre 
registration is required; fill out 
a registration form in the 
Discovery Room or send the 
coupon on page 4 to the 
Education Department. Call 
(212) 769-5310 with any 
questions. 



^SPRING^IS^HERK^ 

Celebrate 




Mother's Day 

Sunday, May 14th 

Holiday Buffet 

I I, nn I pm 

Vdulu 116 95 < ini.tr. .. under 10,18.95 

KniTi nii»'i> uiggetted 

« all the Garden I af< it 212 769 ■•"■'• i 

1,111 ill" .1 .." ill" I >•«> i I fv«*l 




; *r^ 



Naturemax 




Africa: The Serengeti 



The IMAX film Africa The 
Serengeti explores the rela- 
tionships between predator 
and prey by following the 
great migration of wilde- 
beests, zebras, and other 
animals. Showtimes are 
10:30 and 11:30 a.m. and 
1.30 and 3:30 p.m. daily. 

Yellowstone takes viewers 
on a journey to the national 
park to discover its history, 
geology, and wildlife. Show- 
times are 12:30. 230. and 
4.30 p.m. 



On Friday and Saturday at 
6:00 and 7:30 p.m.. Africa: 
The Serengeti is shown on a 
double bill with Yellowstone. 
Schedules and prices are 
subject to change without 
notice. Call (212) 769-5650 
for further information. 

Admission (Participating and 
Higher Members) 

Adults: $4.75 single fea- 
ture; $6 double feature 

Children: $2.25 single 
feature; $3.25 double feature 



Spiders! 



The facts of spider life are as fantastic as fiction. The current 
Gallery 3 exhibition Spiders! explores the incredible diversity of 
spiders, which are found everywhere, in almost all habitats. 
Very few spiders are deadly or dangerous; most spiders help 
humans because they eat insects and maintain ecosystem bal- 
ance. The exhibition is on display through June 4. 




Museum Notes 



Hours 

Exhibition Halls 

Mon.-Thurs. & Sun 10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

Fri. &Sat 10:00 a.m.-8:45 p.m. 

The Museum Shop 

Mon.-Thurs. & Sun 10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

Fri. & Sat 10:00 a.m. -7:45 p.m. 

The Junior Shop 

Mon -Fri 10:00 a.m.-4:45 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun 10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

The Museum Library 

Tues.-Fri 11:00 a.m. -4:00 p m 

The Natural Science Center 

For children of all ages and their families. 
Closed on Mondays and holidays. 

Tues.-Fri 2:00-4:30 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun 100-4:30 p.m. 



The Discovery Room 

Passes are distributed at the first-floor informa- 
tion desk beginning at 11:45 a.m. Ages 5-15 
Children must be accompanied by an adult. 
Closed on holidays and weekdays. 

Sat. & Sun. Noon-4:30 p.m. 

Museum Dining 

Diner Saurus Fast Service Eatery 

Daily 1 1 00 a.m.-4:45 p.m. 

Garden Cafe 

Reservations: (212) 769-5865 

Lunch: Mon. -Fn 1 130 a.m. -3:30 p m 

Dinner. -Fri. & Sat. 5:00-7:30 p.m 

Brunch: Sat. & Sun 11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

Whales Lair 

Fri 3:00-8:00 p.m. 



Sat Noon 8 00 p m 

Sun. & most holidays Noon-5 00 p m 
Snack Carts 

Sat. & Sun I 1 00a.m.-4:00pm 



Happenings at the Hayden 



Lectures 

Frontiers in Astronomy and 
Astrophysics 

On Monday. May 8, at 7:30 p.m.. Alex 
Rlippenko. professor of astronomy at the University 
of California at Berkeley, will present an illustrated 
talk. "Exploding Stars — Celestial Fireworks " 

This lecture is part of the Frontiers in 
Astronomy and Astrophysics senes. Tickets are 
$6 for Participating and Higher Members and $8 
for non-Members. For information about ticket 
availability and upcoming lectures, call (212) 769- 
5900 



Sky Show 

The Ten Most-Asked 
Questions about the 
Universe 

What is a black hole? Is there life elsewhere in the 
universe? How will the universe end 9 This Sky 
Show answers these and other frequently asked 
questions about space. 

Showtimes: 

Mon -Fn 1 30 and 3:30 p.m. 

Sat 1 1 00 a m lexcept for May 6 

and June 3). 100. 2:00. 3:00. 4 00 

and 5:00 p m 

Sun 1:00. 2 00. 3 00. 400. and 500 p.m 



Admission (Participating and Higher Members) 
Adults: $4 
Children (2-12): $2 

Call (212) 769-5100 for additional information 
and non-Members' prices. Please note that pnces 
are subject to change without prior notice. 

Exhibition 

The Universe Revealed: Recent Images 
from the Hubble Space Telescope 

This exhibition features photographs of recent 
discoveries made by the Hubble Space Telescope, 
including the M87 galaxy (which proves the exis- 
tence of black holes) and images of the Shoemaker- 
Levy 9 comet strikes on Jupiter. A 1 1 5 scale 
model of the Space Shuttle Obiter deploying the 
Hubble is on display, along with a scale model of 
the Optical Telescope Assembly of the Hubble 
Space Telescope and a video of the repair mission 
of December 1993 

Children's Shows 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers. Children sing along with images of 
their favorite Sesame Street Muppets as they learn 
about rainbows, the phases of the moon, s 
and stars. Sat.. May 6. at 10:30 am , and Sat.. 
June 3. at 10:30 and 1 1 45 a.m. Adi 
Participating and Higher Members is $4 for ad' 
and $2 for children Members can purchase up to 
four tickets at the Members' price. 



Entrances 

During MusruNi hours visitors can enti i the 
l>i aiding through the 77th Stt\ > thi 

parking lot entrance (81st Street) oi the Roo 
ieuelt A/, morlal I (all entran md 

Central Park West) Visitors attending pro- 
grams after hours can enter the building 
at 79th Street and Central Park West 



Shows usually sell out in advance; reservations, by 
mail only, are necessary. Order-, musl be rei elved 
two weeks prior to show date Make your cl 
payable to the Hayden Planetarium (attn Wonderful 
Sky. Central Pari d Blsl Street, New York, 

NY 10024-5192) Indicate membership category 
and a first and second choice of showtimes. Be sure 
to include a self addressed, stamped envelope and 
your daytime telephone number For additx >iiril 
information call (212) 769 »900. 

Robots in Space features Lucasfilm 3 R2D2 and 
C-3PO- and has been created espei lally foi i Ml 
dren ages 7 to 12. Together with a live hosl tl 
famous space robots take children on a tour of the 
universe See how satellites and probes — the real 
space robots — help us learn about worlds near 
and far Journey from the earth to other planets 
and distant black holes Sal May 6. at Ll:45a.m 
Admission for Parti. Ipating and I ligher Memlx i 
$4 for adults and $2 for children I 01 Informatli in 
call (212) 769-5900 



Laser Light Shows 

Joumey into anothei lunension where la 
als and rock music combine to create a dazzling I 1 1 
experien* ht and sound ^nted 

onFri id Seturdaysal 7 00.8:30 and 10:00 

p.m I e$ and show schedule telephone 

(212)769-51ii'/ 

It's always a good idea to call before vis 
ing the Planetarium, since prices, programs, 
and showtimes are subject to change without 
notice. For general Planetarium information, 
call (212) 769-5100. 



»wr» 




The Apatosaurus. originally 
called Brontosaurus. was the first 
larae dinosaur In the world to be 
put on public display when it was 
mounted in 1905. Paleontology 
has come a long way in the last 
90 years, and the new exhibit 
reflects improved understanding 
of dinosaur anatomy with a new 
skull and a tail that's 20 feet 

longer. 



Two New Dinosaur Halls Open on June 2 



The second phase of the American 
Museum's major restoration project 
will take place with the opening of 
two new dinosaur halls — the Hal I ot 
Saurischian Dinosaurs and the Hall ot 
Omithischian Dinosaurs. The halls 
have been closed since 1991. when 
the Museum began their renovation 
and restoration (See page 2 for de- 
tails about a Members' preview and 
other special events.) 

The Museum is widely acknowl- 
edged to possess the largest and most 
scientifically important collection ot 
dinosaur fossils in the world and has 
been a leader in the study of these 
creatures for nearly 100 years Di- 
nosaurs have been among the Mu- 
seum's most popular exhibitions since 
thev were first put on display at the 
turn of the century. The new halls 
present the most comprehensive exhi- 
bition of real fossil dinosaur material 
anywhere and the latest scientific 
information regarding these fascinat- 
ing animals 

Approximately 100 specimens are 
featured in the new dinosaur halls 
representing roughly 5 percent ot the 
Museum's collection of 2.000 fossil 
dinosaur specimens An estimated »b 



percent of the specimens .n the new 
halls are real (rather than casts). Inter- 
active computer stations combine 
film, animation, illustrations, and 
video interviews with the Museum s 
scientists to examine both the evolu- 
tionary relationships of dinosaurs and 
their habitats in different time penods. 

Some of the Museum s most ta- 
mous dinosaurs have been remounted 
to reflect changes in the scientific 
understanding of what these animals 
were like. The T^rannosaurus rex 
was completely disassembled, cleaned, 
conserved, and repositioned. Instead 
of standing upright it s now 
positioned in a stalking posture with 
its head looming just above that of the 
viewer Apatosaurus (previously re- 
Co to £ Brontosaurus) has a new 
skull, additional neck bones, and a tail 
that has been lengthened by ove 20 
feet Other highlights include ad - 
rSaur 'mummy ' that shows detailed 
impressions of skin and other soft 
Sues of a duck-billed dinosaur; an 
extremely rare fossil skeleton showing 

skin impressions of a horned 
dinosaur, one of the world s few Ve- 
To™r%tor specimens; and numerous 
dinosaur fossils that have never before 



been on public view. 

These halls represent an innovative 
examination of the history of life. 
Most museums organize their fossil 
exhibits in a chronological progres- 
sion from oldest to youngest; these 
are arranged in the form of a giant 
family tree. This approach explores 
evolutionary history and interrelation- 
ships among vertebrates and presents 
visitors with fresh insights and many 

SU Theopening of the dinosaur hall 
represents the second phase of the 
Museums spectacular restructuring of 
its fossil halls. The entire renovati. m 
project, which will be completed in 
1996 will consist of six new halls that 
tell the story of vertebrate evolution 
with the world's largest and most 
scientifically important array off" 

Production of exhibition dements 
for the fossil halls began in 1989 in 
the Museums workshops and other 
facilit.es The Lila Acheson Wallace 
Wing of Mammals and Their Extinc t 
Relatives opened last year, the 
dinosaur halls open this month, and 
an orientation center and primitive 
vertebrate hall will open next year. 
As part of this ambitious project. 



the Museum is i. -.toting 'I" fourth 
floor halls to their onginal architec- 
tural grandeur. The n< P ' opens 
Ibition spaces and reveals architec- 
tural details that were hidden for 
decades and gives visitor, .m imm. '!■ 

iense of the Museum's currenl 
scientific res. sari h 

Major support for the fossil halls 
has come from the Trustees. >< 'I" 
American Museum of Natural History 
and the City of New York The Lila 
Acheson Wallace Wing of Mammals 
and Their Extuut Relatives, which 
opened In L994 was named In recog- 
nition of the Important su pi »«.ri ih. 
Museum has received from the I il<i 
Acheson Wallace/American Museum 

Natural History Fund, which was 
established in 1980 at the New York 

ConM,...niiv Trust by the col :!.-. 

f the Reader's Digest A^ >•>""" 

ndPaulMilsteinlUI 
of Advanced Mammals was named in 
recognition of the MUstelns* major 
gift Exxon Corporation, the Kresge 
Foundation, and the Miriam and Ira 
D. Wallach Foundation have 
provided generous support The 
Miriam and Ira D Wallach Orientation 
Center will open in 1996. 






1 






Prison 
Tattoos 

Tuesday, June 20 



i >rding to the Book of 
Genesis, God placed a mark 
the world's tosl murderer 
befor. sending him into exile. 
The mark of Cain proclaimed 
its bearer as a criminal and 
social outcast and for cen- 
turies prisoners and othei 
criminals were fan Ibly tat- 

■ ill, numb 
othei marks that made them 
easy to identify, locate, label. 

and isolate. 

Today the vast majon 

men behind bars in the 
United States are tattooed. 



most of them voluntarily 
Chris Brady of the Idaho 

State Historical Society will 
dig uss ihe distinctive style 
and symbolism of prison tat- 
toos, which are significantly 
different in looks and mean- 
ing from other tattoos. 

For instance, prison tattoos 
aren't colorful. The desig. 
are all black, and the wearers 
tend not to add color to them 
when they have the opportu- 
nity The single i ech- 
nique. which features 

S and shading, sets prison 
.part from oul 
work — although the style 
Imitated In the mid-1970s 

ide tattoo arti 
Inmates are skilled at read- 
ing each other's tattoos, 
which can tell them who to 
be friends with and who to 




An angel of mercy on the arm of a lifer 



stay away from or reveal the 
wearer's crime or the length 
of his sentence. (Only 5 per- 
cent of US convicts are fe- 
male; tattooing is not a 
common prison activity 
among them ) 

Like prisoners, gang mem- 
bers and enlisted men often 
sport tattoos. These three 
groups share certain charac- 
teristics, their senses of indi- 
vidual identity arc taken away 
or lessened, and they are 
deprived of the usual forms of 

ion. Clothing, 
activities, possession^ and 
relationships are controlled by 
gang, prison, or military pol- 
icy. What the individual puts 
on his skin is a form of non- 
verbal communication for all 
to see. Within the prison 
culture, inmates say that tat 
toos are a visual record i if 
their lives that offer a sense of 
belonging and show that the 
recipient can handle pain 

Chris Brady is historic sites 
administrator at the Idaho 
State Historical Society, 
which is located at Old Idaho 
Penitentiary. This program is 
presented in conjunction with 
a permanent exhibition on 
tattooing at the historical 
society Brady, whose training 
is in textiles and clothing his- 
tory, is working on a traveling 
exhibition. 

The program will take 
place at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Kaufmann Theater. Tickets 
are $8 for Members and $12 
for non-Members. Use the 
June Members" programs 
coupon on page 3 to register. 



Celebrate the 
Return of the 
Dinosaurs 



Seeing New 
York: History 
Walks for 
Armchair and 

Footloose 
Travelers 

Tuesday, June 27 



Members can hear a fasci- 
nating account of New York's 
social history, architecture, 
and culture at the program 
mg New York. History 
Walks for Armchair and 
Footloose Travelers. Histo- 
rian Hope Cooke believes 
that many of us live like exiles 
in our own surroundings; to 
remedy this, she'll take listen- 
ers off the beaten path to 
discover how social change 
has reworked New York's 
terrain. 

The program will be based 
on Cooke's book, Seeing 
New York, which is available 
from Temple University 
Press. "As if taking us by the 



hand and conducting us 
from street to street," re- 
marked architectural writer 
Brendan Gill, "Cooke 
evokes the sights and 
smells and sounds of all 
those earlier New Yorks. . . 
Wherever she leads us. we 
are happy to follow." The 
book will be available for 
purchase at the program, 
and Cooke will sign copies 
after the show. 

The program will take 
place at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Kaufmann Theater. Tickets 
are $5 for Members and 
$8 for non-Members. Use 
the coupon on page 3 to 
register. 



Pueblo Myths 

For adults 
Friday, June 16 



For children, ages 7-12 
Saturday, June 17 



Teresa Pijoan will tell tali 
,,i magi< and faith i reation 
and regeneration when she 
conu this 

mi nth She'll present two 
Members programs, an 

i ling show for adults and 
B morning program for chil 
dren, in which she n relate 
s,.ine of the eru banting 
myths of New Mexico's native 
wa peopl*' 



At the program for adults, 
Pijoan will perform the cre- 
ation myth of Awonawilona 
with her face painted in two 
shades — half in black (repre- 
senting Father Sky), and half 
in white (for Mother Earth) 
SI ie 11 also tell a Tewa story 
(from Taos and Picuris 
Pueblo). "Nah-chu-ru-chu 

eps Moon Woman," and 
a Spanish Pueblo tale called 
"El Angel del Alcalde, the 
humorous story of a young 
woman who marries an older 

man. 

At the children's program 
Pijoan will tell the Iroquois 
tale "The Hying Head", a 

ation myth. The Shortest 
Story Ever Told ; and Ah 
ha-a uu-Tah and the Cloud 
Eatei I he program will 
include movement, exercise, 
and total group participation 



Children will leam to speak 
some Tewa words, use Indian 
Sign Language, greet in the 
traditional Pueblo way, and 
leam to be a "storyholder" 
The adults' program will 
take place on Friday, June 
16, at 7.00 p.m. in the Un- 
der Theater. Tickets are $8 
for Members and $12 for 
non-Members. Use the June 
Members' programs coupon 
on page 3 to register The 
children's program will take 
place on Saturday, June 17. 
at HOOa.m in the Edith C 
Blum Lecture Room Tickets 
are $10 and available only by 
mail to Participating and 
I ligher Members Use the 
coupon on page 5 to order 
tickets, and please note that 
this program is for children 
only. Both programs are ap- 
proximately one hour long. 



Be among the first to take 
a look at the new dinosaur 
l,.,lis at the Members' pre- 
view, and bring the kids to a 
ive Saturday of dinosaur- 
theme activities. 

Members' Preview of 
the New Dinosaur 
Halls 

On Thursday. June 1. 
from 4:00 to 9:00 p.m. 
Participating and Higher 
Members can attend a pre- 
view of the new halls. Volun- 
teer Highlights Tour guides 
will be on hand to talk about 
the exhibits and answer ques- 
tions. No tickets are neces- 
sary for this free preview, 
your valid membership card 
is your ticket of admission. 

Dinosaurs Today 



On the evening of the 
preview paleontologist Mark 
Norell will talk about the 
design of the two new di- 
nosaur halls and the ways in 
which they reflect the latest 
advances in scientific under- 
standing of dinosaur life. 
Norell. who is an associate 
curator in the Department of 
Vertebrate Paleontology, was 
instrumental in the prepara- 
tion of the new halls, and 
he'll explain how their design 
traces evolutionary history 
and the interrelationships 
among vertebrates. 

Norell's new book, Discov- 



ering Dinosaurs at the 
American Museum of Natu- 
ral History, will be available 
for purchase at the program 
After the show. Norell will 
sign copies of the book, 
which was co-written with 
curator Eugene Gaffney and 
research associate Lowell 
Dingus. 

Dinosaurs Today will take 
place at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Kaufmann Theater Tickets 
are $6 for Members and $9 
for non-Members Call the 
Membership Office at (212) 
769-5606 for information 
about ticket availability. 



Dinoday 

Young Members can wel- 
come back the dinosaurs on 
Saturday, June 3. at Dino- 
day. Musician Chris Rowland 
will present Dino Rock, a 
fast-paced and fun-filled pro- 
gram of song and dance. The 
latest theories and fossil facts 
are featured in a program 
that will appeal to both 
novices and die-hard dinosaur 
enthusiasts. 

Before or after Dino Rock 
kids can participate in a crafts 
workshop, at which June 
Myles will help them make a 
dinosaur memento to take 
home. They can also play 
Dinosaur Bingo in the Linder 
Theater. 

Tickets for Dinoday axe 
$15 and available only to 
Participating and Higher 
Members ages 4 and older. 
Dino Rock will take place in 
the Kaufmann Theater at 
11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. 
(Members wishing to register 
for Dino Rock only can do 
so; tickets are $6 each.) Di- 
nosaur Bingo and the crafts 
workshop will take place at 
10:30 a.m. and 12:30 and 
230 p.m. Call (212) 769- 
5547 for information about 
ticket availability for Dinoday 
Those wishing to attend Dino 
Rock only can call (212) 769- 
5606 for ticket availability. 




ISSN 0194-6110 

Vol. 20, No. 6 
June 1995 

Donna Bell — Editor 

Sheila Greenberg — Manager of Membership Services 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Traci Buckner — Assistant Manager 

Robert Jahn — Program Coordinator 

Peter Zelaya — Special Projects Coordinator 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and Higher 
Members of the American Museum of Natural History is 
published monthly September through June, bimonthly July an 
August Publication offices are at Natural History magazine 
American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at / 
Street. New York, NY 10024-5192. Telephone: (212) 769- 
5606 Subscriptions: $50 a year for Participating Membership. 
$100 a year for Contributor Membership 
© 1995 American Museum of Natural History. Se cond J»2 
postage paid at New York. NY. Postmaster: Please send addre 
changes to: Rotunda. Membership Office. American Museum 
Natural History. Central Park West at 79th Street. New York. 
NY 10024-5192. 



Printed by Waldon Press. Inc., New York 



. HI 



Carlota 

Santana 

Spanish 

Dance 

Company 

Thursday, June 8 



The passionate flamenco 
is the root of Spanish dance 
and the focus of a perfor- 
mance by the Carlota 
Santana Spanish Dance 
Company. The company, 
which was founded in 1983 
with the mission of preserving 
traditional dance, combines 
flamenco with original 
choreography influenced by 
salsa and jazz. Spanish dance 
for this company is educa- 
tional as well as entertaining; 
it's a way to break down cul- 
tural barriers with deep plies, 
open arms, expressive move- 



ments, and new rhythms 

Their repertoire will 
embrace the varied styles of 
Spanish dance from classical 
to folkloric to flamenco. From 
the sounds of the classical 
music of Albeniz to the gypsy 
chants of the cante jondo 
(deep song), the company 
portrays the roots of Spanish 
music and dance, which have 
had a great influence on the 
music of the Americas 

Touring with six to eight 
dancers and musicians, the 
ensemble has appeared to 
great critical acclaim on major 
dance stages throughout the 
United States, including the 
Joyce Theater in New York 
City, Albany's Empire State 
Performing Arts Center, the 
Schubert Theater in Con- 
necticut, and many others. 

The program will take 
place at 8:00 p.m. in the 
Main Auditorium. Tickets are 
$15 for Members and $20 
for non-Members. Use the 
June Members' programs 
coupon at right to register. 



HMm 




Members' Fossil 
Casting Workshop 

Dinosaurs 
in Relief 

Saturday, July 22 

10:00 a.m.-l :00 p.m. 

$50, and open only to 

Participating 

and Higher Members 

Ages 12 and older 



Members will use teeth and 
tails, claws or jaws, chevrons, 
skin patches, and other dino- 
saurian parts to create their 
own professional-quality fossil 
collage. Participants will 
leam the techniques used by 
Museum artisans at this work- 
shop, where they'll design 
their own low-relief dinosaur 
sculptures. 

Participants will make a 
mold and pour casts to create 
a 3-D montage of dinosaur 



parts. They'll work under the 
tutelage of Pamela Popeson, 
who has been working with 
artifacts and fine art objects 
for more than 16 years. She 
is currently a master crafts- 
man at the Museum, where 
she makes molds and casts of 
specimens for the reproduc- 
tion studio. 

Use the coupon on page 5 
to register for the workshops, 
and please note that tickets 
are available only by mail. 




An Allosaurus feeds on Apatosaurus in the newly re-opened dinosaur halts 



Summer 
Workshops 
for Children 

August 7-1 1 
10:30 a.m.-noon 
$18, and open only to 
Participating and 
Higher Members 
Ages 6-9 



Young Members can spend 
a summer morning at the 
Museum, where naturalist 
June Myles will show them 
some exhibits, introduce 
them to some fun facts, and 
help them make an arts-and- 
crafts item to take home. Use 
the Summer Workshops for 
Children coupon on this 
page to register, and please 
note thai ire available 

only by mail. 

Long in the Tooth. Mon- 
day. August 7. We'll take 



adequate precautions to avoid 
the swish of the tail and the 
gnashing of teeth when we 
visit the camosaurs ("flesh 
lizards") in their new home. 
They were massive, but were 
they quick? Are birds their 
living relatives? If so. why are 
birds so small? These are 
some of the puzzles we'll 
tackle. Then we'll make a 
tooth that will keep the tooth 
fairy jumping! 

Frills and Bills. Horns and 
Plates Tuesday. August 8 
We're safe to wander through 
this neighborhood since the 
ornithischians were plant 
eaters We'll examine the 
necessity of their add-ons — 
the frills and bills — and we'll 
try to understand what all 
these odd-looking creatures 
had in common Then we'll 
construct one to take home 
— a well-known extii 
species or perhaps a new 
discovery 

But Bel- re Were 

Dinosaurs. Wednesday, Au- 



gust 9. There were BUGS! Big 
bugs! And they just keep com- 
ing. There are more of these 
little animals than any other 
creatures — probably more 
than 200,000 insects for 
every one of us — and many 
of them haven't even been 
identified yet. We'll look at 
fossil insects, enlarged insects, 
and everyday insects, and we'll 
make a bug pet to take home. 

What's the Point? Thurs- 
day. August 10. Survival is 
usually the point, and we'll 
search the museum for all 
sorts of organisms that "got 
the point." Then we'll try to 
figure out how their adapta- 
tions helped in their survival, 
and we'll use some of these 
points to create a print 

Snakes Alive' Friday. Au- 
gust 11 We'll take a look at 

snakes in the Hall ( .1 
tiles and Am] and 

then we'll fashion some ser- 
pents of our own to take 

me — garden variety or 
exoi: 



June Members' 
Programs Coupon 



Name:. 



Address: 
City: 



S|.,|,' 



.Zip: . 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category. 



Total amount enclosed: • 

Please make check (if applicable) payable to the American 
eum ol Natural History and mail with b self- 
addressed, stamped envelope to; June Members' Pro- 
grams. Membership Office, American Museum ol Natural 
History, Ccnli.il Park Wi >th Street. N. I NY 

1 1 in.' I 3192 Telephone reservations arc not accep- 
ted. No refunds or exchanges. 

Unless otherwise indicated, no more than eight 
tickets may be ordered for a program. Partu I 
pating Members are entitled to four tickets per 
program at the Members' price. Higher Members 
are entitled to six tickets, and Associate Members 
are entitled to one ticket. 

Spanish Dance. Thursda' lunr S. S 00 |. m 

Number of Members' tickets at $15: 

Number of additional tickets at $20: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Pueblo Myths (for adults). Friday, June 16, 7:00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $8: 

Number of additional tickets at $12: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Prison Tattoos. Tuesday, June 20. 7:00 p.m 

Number of Members' tickets at $8: 

Number of additional tickets at $12-_ ta _ 
Total amount enclosed for program 

Seeing New York. Tuesday, June 27. 700 p.m 

Number of Members' tickets at $5: 

Number of additional tickets at $8: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

The Fossil Trail. Thursday July 6, 7:00 p.m. 

Number of Mci nbers tickets at $6: 

Number of additti 'n.<l tickets at $9: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Spell of the Tiger. Thursday, July 13, 7:00 p m 

Number of Members' tickets at $8: 

Number of additional tickets at $12: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

NOTE: Orders received less than ten days before 
show dates will be held for pick-up at the door on 
the day of the program if tickets are still available. 
If an event is sold out, you will be advised in writing 
or by phone and your check will be returned. 



p -i 

Summer Workshops for Children. Please Indli ate num- 
ber of tickets for each workshop. Tli kets are $18 ea< h 

Long In the Tooth, Aug. 7: 

Frills and Bills. Aug. 8: 

But Before Dinosaurs. Aug. 9: 

What's the Point?. Aug. 10: 

Snakes Alive. Aug. 11: 

Total amount enclosed: 

Name: 



Address 
City: 



.State: 



.Zip: 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category:. 



Please make check payable I 

ry and mail with a self-addressed, stamped 

envelope I 

,\, u , . Park West at 

79th Stre rk, NY 1002- 



' 



I 






Spell of the Tiger 



Thursday, July 13 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$8 for Members, $12 for non-Members 



Spell of the Tiger offers a 
look at the deadliest tigers on 
earth, the people who 
among them, and a tropical 
world rich with myths, magic, 
and mystery Author Sy 
Montgomery will tell the true 
h iry of a unique population 
of wild tigers that thrives be- 



cause their human neighbors 
regard them as magical rulers 
of an enchanted land. 

Sundarbans (pronounced 
SHUN-der-buns). the world's 
largest mangrove swamp, 
stretches between India and 
Bangladesh along the Bay 
of Bengal. Its tigers are 




Illustration of an oviraptor 
and okI by artist Gjry Slaab 
for the iune 1995 issue of 
Natural History magazine. 




Set Aside a 
Nest Egg 4 

for ^ 

Science 
and 

Conservation.. 



With a Planned Gift to the 
American Museum of Natural History. 

Help us promote prese 1 1 ation and extend understanding of" the natural world for generations 
to come I 'I- ise call toll Free 1 (800) 453-5734 or complete and return this confidential reply 
form to Jane C. Palmer, Director of Planned Giving, Office of Development, American 
Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192. 



Please send me information on: 

D Including die Museum in my Will; 

DA gift plan that provides lifetime income, offers an immediate income tax deduction 

and avoids capital gains tax when appreciated assets are sold to reinvest for higher 

income; 

□ Ways to support the Museum that assist in passing assets to heirs while sigruficandy 
reducing — or even eliminating — estate tax. 

□ I have already included a bequest to the Museum in my Will. 

Comments 



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Address 



Phone: Home 



Offi 



cc 



Your reply is confidential and implies no obligation. 






Sy Montgomery with Siberian tiger cub 



formidable hunters that swim 
after boats, hunt by day as 
well as by night, and kill 
scores of people each year. 
The maneaters seem to re- 
spect their prey, avoiding eye 
contact and declining to at- 
tack when their victims are 
facing them. For a while the 
tigers were deterred when 
people who ventured into the 
forest wore masks on the 
backs of their heads. But 
mostly, the people of Sundar- 
bans protect themselves by 
prayer. For if the tiger re- 



spects its victim, the feeling is 
mutual. The people of Sun- 
darbans fear the tiger but do 
not hate or hunt it; instead, 
Hindus and Moslems worship 
it side by side. The maneater 
is known by the name of 
Daksin Ray, the warrior tiger 
god and lord of the region. 
Montgomery's lecture is 
based on her new book Spell 
of the Tiger (Houghton Mif- 
flin Co.), praised in a New 
York Times book review as 
"fascinating" and "moving." 
Her research involved three 



trips to India and Bangladesh, 
where she lived among the 
natives of Sundarbans and 
tracked tigers in the forest 
Montgomery is also the au- 
thor of Walking with the 
Great Apes. Jane Goodoll, 
Dian Fossey. and Birute 
Galdikas. Copies of Spell of 
the Tiger will be available for 
purchase at the program, and 
there will be a book-signing 
after the show. Use the June 
Members' programs coupon 
on page 3 to register for the 
program. 



Take a Free 
Ride at the 
American 
Museum 



The 63-foot Haida war 
canoe was carved from a 

|le piece of wood in 1878 
by natives of the Queen 
Charlotte Islands,. 1 1 British 
Columbia ["he >:anoe is 
among the 50 treasures high 
lighted in the self-guided tours 
Expedition Treasures from 
125 Years of Discoiv 
Visitors can come to the base 
camp in the Hall of Asian 
Mammals on the second floor 
for an orientation session 
that sends them on a treasure 
hunt around the Museum 




in the manner of a grand 
expedition They can rent a 
CD-ROM handheld player 
that provides detailed infor- 
mation about each of the 



treasures. 

Expedition: Treasures 
from 125 Years of Discov- 
ery has been generously 
sponsored by a grant from 



Lincoln Continental. Lincoln 
is helping the Museum 
celebrate Parents and Grand- 
parents Day by offering com- 
plimentary rickets for the 



Expedition program that will 
be valid on June 24 and 25 
The rickets are available at 
any New York area Lincoln- 
Mercury dealership 



The Fossil Trail 

Thursday, July 6 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$6 for Members, $9 for non-Members 

In one of the Hall of 
Human Biology and Evolu- 
tion's dioramas a 3-million- 
vear-old pair of our ancestors 
walk side by side through a 
snowy landscape of volcanic 
ash. They're hairy and ape- 
like but they're unmistakably 
human. 

The diorama was based on 
a 1974 discovery of fossil 
footprints in Laetoli. Tanza- 
nia. How did the diorama's 
creators know what these 
early humans looked like, and 
how have scientists recon- 
structed the eons-long journey 
from these first ancient steps 
to where we stand today? In 
short, how do we know what 
we think we know about 
human evolution? 

Anthropologist Ian Tatter- 
sall will explain at The Fossil 
Trail, an examination of the 
study of human evolution that 
will feature highlights from 
the colorful history of fossil 
discoveries and an insider's 
look at how these finds have 
been interpreted — and mis- 
interpreted — through time. 

Chairman and curator in 
the Department of Anthro- 
pology, Ian Tattersall was in 
charge of the design and 




Diorama of earliest human relatives in the Hall of 
Human Biology and Evolution 



execution of the Hall of 
Human Biology and Evolu- 
tion, which opened in 1993 
The Fossil Trail is presented 
in conjunction with the publi- 
cation by Oxford University 
Press of his book of the same 



name. The book will be avail- 
able for purchase at the 
show, and Tattersall will sign 
copies afterward. 

Use the June Members' 
programs coupon on page 3 
to register. 



Members' Day Trip 

How Water Works 

New York City's Water Supply and Pollution Control Systems 

Thursday, July 20 

8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 

$50, and open only to Participating and Higher Members 



Members can observe a 
paragon of modern-day engi- 
neering on a tour of the New 
York City water supply sys- 
tem, which provides the best- 
quality municipal water in the 
world. Participants can learn 
about the current system as 
well as the city's planned 
improvements for the future. 
How the city treats its waste 
water and storm flow will also 
be shown. 

The trip will begin with an ( 
extensive tour of the Ward's 
Island Pollution Control Plant. 
From there Members will 



travel to the Bronx for a tour 
of the Jerome Park Reservoir 
and Pilot Filtration Plant. 

The tours will view part of 
the Third Water Tunnel in the 
Bronx, and Members will 
descend more than 200 feet 
below Van Cortlandt Park to 
observe the internal water 
works. The trip will conclude 
at Hillview Reservoir. 

Representatives from the 
Department of Environmental 
Protection will be on hand at 
all of the sites to explain as- 
pects of the system, and 
Sidney Horenstein, the Mu- 



seum's coordinator of envi- 
ronmental public programs, 
will lead the tours from start 
to finish. 

Tickets are $50 each. The 
fees for this program are for 
transportation and educa- 
tional presentations only; 
there is no admission cbarge 
for tours of the sites. No food 
will be available on the tours, 
so be sure to bring a bag 
lunch and beverages. Partici- 
pants must be 16 and older. 
Use the coupon on this page 
to register; tickets are avail- 
able only by mail. 



Members 9 Guided Tours 



Fiction, folklore, and fact 
are interwoven in a fascinat- 
ing series of Museum tours. 
The following special tours 
will be conducted by Volun- 
teer Highlights Tour guide 
Robert Campanile. All tours 
will begin at 6:30 p.m. Call 
(212) 769-5547 to register. 

A Midsummer Night. Fri- 
day, June 23. Supernatural 
beings were thought to roam 
on midsummer night, and 
participants will cautiously 
explore some of the more 
remote comers of the Mu- 
seum for signs of the super- 
natural. The tour will 
conclude in North American 



Forests with a dramatic read- 
ing from Shakespeare's A 
Midsummer Night's Dream 

Journey to the Center of 
the Earth Fnday. July 14 A 
journey once made in science 
fiction can now be made in 
science fact when participants 
retrace the steps of Jules 
Verne's novel through Mu- 
seum exhibits. Readings from 
the novel are combined with 
the reality of science to show 
how facts can be as exciting 
as the most imaginative work 
of fiction 

The Equator. Friday. Au- 
gust 18. Participants will cir- 
cle the equator on a journey 



of nearly 25,000 miles The 
weather: hot, wet to chilly, 
dry, and even snowy The 
wildlife: 500-pound turtles to 
inflatable birds. The land: flat 
grasslands and volcanic is- 
lands. The people: Asians. 
Africans. South Americans, 
and Pacific Islanders 

King of the Wild Frontier 
Friday, September 15. Ex- 
plore the life and times of 
an American folk hero — 
Davy Crockett, King of the 
Wild Frontier. Strange and 
interesting folklore about the 
wildlife of Davy's times will be 
related in an exciting mosaic 
of frontier life. 



Members' Walking Tour 




The Genius and Elegance of 


Gramercy Park 




Saturday, July 15 




11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. 




$25, and open only to 




Participating and Higher Members 


This landmark district 


writers, painters, losing and 


started out as marshland and 


winning presidential candi- 


wound up as home to some 


dates, and a wit< h 


of America's greatest inven- 


e Gold i' New 


tors, architects, and actors, 


York history at New York 


Members can explore the 


Univei situ and the New 


Gramercy Park area with 


School for Social Re «arch. 


historian Joyce Gold, who'll 


I ".nil. Ipants will meet in fronl 


point out the nineteenth 


of the ( iramen y Park I li itel 


century homes of Peter 


on 1 exington Avenue and 


Cooper. Edwin Booth, and 


21st Streel 1 Ise the < i up in 


Stanford White She'll also 


on this page to registei and 


discuss other past residents — 


please note thai Ik k< ts .ire 


doctors, diarists, publishers, 


available only by in.nl 






; 



Members' Day Trip to a 

Pennsylvania Coal Mine 



Tuesday, July 25 
7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. 
$65, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 
Ages 16 and older 



Members can explore some 
of the Northeast's major geo- 
logical provinces with Sidney 
Horenstein, the Museum's 
coordinator of environmental 
public programs. 

They'll board a bus at the 
Museum and travel across 
New Jersey to the spectacular 
Delaware Water Gap. The 
journey continues across 
Pennsylvania's Appalachians, 



where III.' i(ioiip will In '.ml 

coal trains and ent.'i both 
subsurface and open-pit 
mines. Retired coal nun. 
will he on hand to dl CUSS 
their experiences. The final 
slop i . foi .' short walk along 
a wooded path to coil I 
plani fi iSSllfi 

Use the coupon below to 
register; tickets are available 
only by mail. 






Tours, Day Trips, and Workshops. Use this coupon to 
register for the children's program Pueblo Myths. Dinosaurs 
in Relief, How Water Work-., the Coal Mm.- trip and the 
Walking Tour of Gramercy Park. 



Name(s) of program(s): 



Number of tickets and price (please indicate which program 
if more than one): 



Total amount enclosed:. 
Name: 



Address: 
City: 



State 



J*p: 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category:. 



Please make check payable to the American Museum of 
Natural History and mail with a self-addressed, stamped 
envelope to: Tours and Workshops, Membership Office 
American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 
79th Street, New York. NY 10024-5192 



Undiscovered Greek Islands 




'X~ *** 



Su X. 



Join American Museum 
provosl of science Michael 
Novacek this fall, from 
September 23 through Octo- 
bei 7, as he hosts the Discov- 
ery Cruise Undiscovered 
Greek Islands and lectures 
on the region's geology and 
natural history. American 
Museum participants will be 
joined by members of the 
Royal Ontario Museum and 
classicist Alexander McKay, 
who will share his expertise in 
Greek art and architecture. 

Scattered throughout the 
Aegean Sea are hundreds of 



The Parthenon, Athens 

islands, many of which are 
associated with Greek legends 
and history. Many of these 
small, out-of-the-way islands 
are seldom visited by tourists; 
for centuries only fishermen, 
pilgrims, and yachtsmen have 
known about their manifold 
charms and treasures — en- 
chanting towns, fruit groves, 
Greek and Roman ruins, and 
Byzantine churches. 

This cruise will visit more 
than ten of these isolated 
isles, including Amorgos, with 
its whitewashed monastery 
clinging to a sheer cliff; 



Naxos, where a giant marble 
kouros of Apollo was carved 
more than 2,500 years ago 
but never finished and lies 
abandoned above the sea; 
Siphnos, site of many Byzan- 
tine monasteries; and 
Samothraki, with its ancient 
temple ruins. 

Price (per person, double 
occupancy; airfare additional): 
$6,507-$6,857. For further 
information, call (800) 462- 
8687, or in New York State 
at (212) 769-5700, Monday 
through Friday, from 9:00 
a.m. until 5:00 p.m. 



Education Department Field Trips 
and Geology Boat Cruises 



The following programs are 
sponsored by the Department 
of Education. To register, 
send your check payable to 
the American Museum of 
Natural History and mail with 
a self-addressed, stamped 
envelope to. Field Trips and 
Cruises, Education Depart- 
ment, American Museum of 
Natural History, Central Park 
West at 79th Street. New 
York, NY 10024-5192. Be 
sure to indicate the title of the 
program and number of tick- 
ets. If you wish to charge to a 
Mastercard or Visa account, 
include the account number 
and expiration date. 

Call (212) 769-5310 for 
further information. 



Field Trip to Sterling 
Hill Mine 

Visit the last operating zinc 
mine In New Jersey, tour 
undergo »und tunnels and 
learn aboui mining history 
and te< hnologj loseph J 
Peters senii ••■ s< ientif 
i.ini in the Departinriii i >j 

Mineral St li ids this 

toui Bring your own 

9:30 o m 5 00p.m $50 
mbers) 
Lim 16 people. 



A Geology Cruise 
Around Manhattan 

A three-hour boat trip 
around Manhattan surveys 
regional geology. Sidney S. 
Horenstein, coordinator of 
the Museums environmental 
programs, will discuss the 
origins of the Palisades, plant 
and animal environments, 
and local history. Bring your 
own box supper. Tuesday. 
June 6. 600-9.00 p.m. $22 
for Members, $25 for non- 
Members. 



The Nooks and 
Crannies of Western 
New York Harbor 

A three-hour boat tour 
travels south through the bay 
for unusual views of the 
Statue of Liberty and Ellis 
Island. Sidney S Horensi 
coordinator of the Museum's 
environmental programs, will 
discuss the formation of the 

ii M I other New York 
wai' ig your own 

box sup] 

13.6:00 9:00p.m $22 
for Members. $25 for non- 
rubers. 



Exploring the 
Brooklyn Shore Line 

A five-hour boat trip cruises 
along the Brooklyn shore to 
view forts dating back to the 
War of 1812. Passengers will 
sail under the Verrazano Nar- 
rows Bridge, pass Gravesend 
Bay, and travel around Coney 
Island toward the Rockaway 
outlet. Sidney S. Horenstein, 
coordinator of the Museum's 
environmental public pro- 
grams, will comment on local 
history and ecology. Bring 
your own box lunch; snacks 
are available on board Satur- 
day. June 10. 11:00 
a.m-4.00 p.m. $32 for 
Members. $35 for non- 
Members. 

Fall Cape May Birding 
Weekend 

Join Museum naturalists for 
a weekend of birding at Cape 
May, New Jersey, one of the 
world's bird-watching hot 
spots The trip will include 
naturalist-led walks, informal 
lectures, a stop at Brigantine 
National Wildlife Refuge, and 
two boat trips. Fee includes 
ai i ommodations. food, and 
transportation. Friday-Sun 
day, October 20-22. $350 
(double occupancy). Limited 

3 people. Call (212) 
769-5310 for itinerary 



Naturemax 



The IMAX film Africa: The 
Serengeti explores the rela- 
tionships between predator 
and prey by following the 
great migration of wilde- 
beests, zebras, and other 
animals. Showtimes are 
10:30 and 11-30 a.m. and 
1:30 and 3:30 p.m. daily. 

Yellowstone takes viewers 
on a journey to the national 
park to discover its history, 
geology, and wildlife. Show- 
times are 12:30, 2:30, and 
4 30 p.m. 

On Friday and Saturday at 
6:00 and 7:30 p.m., Africa. 
The Serengeti is shown on a 
double bill with Yellowstone. 
Schedules and prices are 
subject to change without 
notice. Call (212) 769-5650 
for further information. 

On July 1 two new movies 
will premiere in the Nature- 



max Theater: Destiny in 
Space and Titanica. The 
newest feature in the astro- 
trilogy that includes The 
Dream Is Alive and Blue 
Planet. Destiny in Space is 
narrated by Leonard Nimoy 
and focuses on the intricate 
partnership of humans and 
robots in the future of space 
exploration Titanica, which 
was shot during an interna- 
tional scientific expedition, 
takes audiences 12,500 feet 
beneath the murky North 
Atlantic to the haunting site 
of the wreck of the Titanic. 



Admission (Participating and 
Higher Members) 

Adults: $4.75 single fea- 
ture; $6 double feature 

Children. $2.25 single 
feature; $3.25 double feature 



Members 9 Birthday Parties 
at the Museum 



Your child can play pin the 
tail on the Stegosaurus, 
make a "fossil'' to take home, 
and enjoy the happiest of 
birthdays among the world's 
biggest and best dinosaurs. 
The dinosaur party, like all 
the Museum birthday parties, 
combines a tour of the exhibi- 
tion halls with games and 
crafts activities. 

Other theme parties for 
Members between the ages 
of 5 and 10 focus on fossil 
mammals, African mammals, 
reptiles and amphibians, 
ocean dwellers. Native Ameri- 
cans, and minerals and gems. 

The group should be no 



fewer than 10 and no more 
than 20. The fee is $300 plus 
$15 per child and covers all 
materials and the services of 
a Museum party coordinator. 
The coordinator will help you 
plan a party that suits your 
child's tastes and will handle 
everything from candles to 
party favors. All you need to 
do is bring the cake and help 
escort the guests. The parties, 
which are two hours long, are 
available only to Members at 
the Contributor ($100) and 
higher levels. 

For more information 
about the children's birthday 
parties call (212) 769-5542. 



The Membership Office would like to thank the following young 
Members who celebrated their birthdays here recently: David Fouhey, 
Alexander Doyle, Brendan Segales, and Billy Holm 



From the Volunteer 
Department 



A Planet-Walk 
through the Solar 
System: The Earth as 
a Peppercorn 

It's difficult to picture the 
dimensions of the solar sys- 
tem — the planets are rela- 
tively small and distances 
between them almost 
absurdly great. For a model 
whose scale is true to size and 
distance, it's necessary to step 
outside. 

A 1,000-yard model of the 
solar system, the planet-walk 
was devised in 1969 by as- 
tronomer and teacher Guy 
Ortewell. The walk begins on 
the Planetarium's front steps 
at 81st Street, where volun- 
teer tour leader Robert Cam- 
panile will take participants 
on a journey of discovery that 
covers the universe. 

The walks will take place at 
1 00 p m on Sunday June 



18, and Sunday, July 16. For 
reservations and further infor- 
mation about the free tours, 
call the Volunteer Office at 
(212) 769-5566. 

Artists and Explorers 
of the AMNH: Time 
Well Spent 

Come hear about dinosaur 
hunters of the past and pres- 
ent and the hardships they 
endured in the field. Learn 
what happens to fossils after 
they're discovered, see the 
results of the complex prepa- 
ration process, and hear 
about the vast invisible sup- 
port network behind the 
scenes 

These tours will take place 
on Saturday. June 3, at 5 30 
p.m . and Friday. June 16. at 
6 00 p. m The tours are free 
bul reservations are required; 
caJI (212) 769-5566. 



Happenings at the Hayden 




Lecture 

Frontiers in Astronomy and 
Astrophysics 

On Thursday, June 15. at 7:30 p.m., Jerry 
Nelson will present an illustrated talk, "The Keck 
Super Telescopes." Nelson, who is an astronomer 
at the University of California and project director 
i the W M Keck Observatory, will talk about the 
unique design aspects of Keck 1 , review some of 
the significant scientific findings for which it is re- 
sponsible, and offer a progress report on Keck 2. 
This lecture is part of the Frontiers in Astron- 
omy and Astrophysics series. Tickets are $6 for 
Participating and Higher Members and $8 for non- 
Members. For information about ticket availability 
and upcoming lectures, call (212) 769-5900. Use 
the coupon below to order tickets. 



Sky Show 



The Ten Most-Asked Questions about 
the Universe 

What is a black hole? Is there life elsewhere in 
the universe? How will the universe end? This Sky 
Show answers these and other frequently asked 
questions about space. 

Showtimes: 

Mon.-Fri.: 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. 

Sat 11:00 a.m. (except for June 3 

and July 8) TOO, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00, 

and 5:00 p.m. 

Sun . 1:00, 2:00, 3:00, 4:00. and 5:00 p.m. 

Admission (Participating and Higher Members) 
Adults: $4 
Children (2-12): $2 

Call (212) 769-5100 for additional information 
and non-Members' prices. Please note that prices 
are subject to change without prior notice. 

Exhibition 

The Universe Revealed: Recent Images 
from the Hubble Space Telescope 

This exhibition features photographs of recent 
discoveries made by the Hubble Space Telescope, 
including the M87 galaxy (which proves the exis- 
tence of black holes) and images of the Shoemaker- 
Levy 9 comet strikes on Jupiter. A 1:15 scale 
model of the Space Shuttle Orbiter deploying the 
Hubble is on display, along with a scale model of 
the Optical Telescope Assembly of the Hubble 
Space Telescope and a video of the repair mission 
of December 1993. 

Children's Shows 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers. Children sing along with images of 
their favorite Sesame Street Muppets as they learn 
about rainbows, the phases of the moon, sunsets, 
and stars. Sat., June 3, at 10:30 and 1 1 45 a.m. 



The current Sky 
Show, The Ten Most- 
Asked Questions about 
the Universe, offers tips 
on using a telescope 



and Sat . July 8, at 10:30 a.m. Admission for Par- 
ticipating and Higher Members is $4 for adults and 
$2 for children. Members can purchase up to four 
tickets at the Members price 

Shows usually sell out in advance; reservations, by 
mail only, are necessary. Orders must be received 
two weeks prior to show date. Make your check 
payable to the Hayden Planetarium (attn Wonderful 
Sky, Central Park West at 81st Street. New York. 
NY 10024-5192); indicate membership category 
and a first and second choice of showtimes. Be sure 
to include a self-addressed, stamped envelope and 
your daytime telephone number. For additional 
information call (212) 769-5900. 

Robots in Space features Lucasfilms R2D2 and 
C-3PO"= and has been created especially for chil- 
dren ages 7 to 12. Together with a live host, these 
famous space robots take children on a tour of the 
universe. See how satellites and probes — the real 
space robots — help us learn about worlds near 
and far. Journey from the earth to other planets 
and distant black holes. Sat., July 8, and Sat., Sept. 
9, at 11:45 a.m. Admission for Participating and 
Higher Members is $4 for adults and $2 for chil- 
dren. For information, call (212) 769-5900. 

Laser Light Shows 

Journey into another dimension where laser visu- 
als and rock music combine to create a dazzling 3-D 
experience of sight and sound. Shows are presented 
on Fridays and Saturdays at 7:00, 8:30, and 10:00 
p.m. For prices and show schedule, telephone 
(212)769-5100. 

It's always a good idea to call before visit- 
ing the Planetarium, since prices, programs, 
and showtimes are subject to change without 
notice. For general Planetarium information, 
call (212) 769-5100. 

r -, 

! Lecture: "The Keck Super Telescopes" 

I Thursday, June 15, 7:30 p.m. 
i 

1 Number of Members' tickets at $6 

(no more than 4, please): 

! Number of non-Members' tickets at $8: 

! Total amount enclosed for program: 



Name:. 



Address: 
City: 



.State: 



.Zip:- 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: 



Please make check payable to the Hayden 
Planetarium and mail with a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to Lecture, Hayden 
Planetarium. Central Park West at 81st Street. 
New York. NY 10024-5192. 

Please note that ticket orders are subj. 
availability and cannot be processed without 
telephone number and stamped, self-addressed 
envelope Do not include ticket requests or 
checks for American Museum programs. 



Museum Notes 

Hours 

I vluhilion Halls 
Mon.-Thurs. & Sun in mi > •< m 

Fri. & Sal 10:00 a.m.-8:45p m 

The Museum Shop 
Mon linns. & Sun 10:00 a.m.-^:45 p.m 

Fri & Sal lo mi., m 1 45 p m 

luilH.I Sin >|' 

Mom Fri 10:00 a.m. -4 45 p.m 

Sat.&Sun. 1000. ,i p m 

The Museum I Ibi 

rues Fri LI oo a.m. -4:00 p m 

The Natural Sciem e Cent 

Fori hlldren <•/ all ages and theli families, 

iSed on Mori.l.u s ,im./ lic/i I n 

rues i rl 2:00 I 10 

Sat.& Sun I o<> I '•" n >n 

f*he IV. overy K, » mi 

Passes are distributed at the lust //.n)( iiiliiiiini 

tlon desk beginning at I ' •/.•> 
Children must he accompanied by an adult 
Closed on holidays and weenie < 
Sat. & Sun N. .. 

Museum Dining 

I Mi u 'i Si mi us R ist Service Eatery 
Daily I I 00a m 1:45] 

Garden Cafe 

Reservations (212)709 5865 
Lunch. Mon. -hi I I 30a m I 10 p.m 

Dlnnei Fri & Sal i 00 < 10 p.m 

Brunch: Sat. & Sun, 1 1 00 a.m.-4:00 p.m 

Whale's Lair 
I ri ! no s oo |i in 

Sat N..on-8:00|' m 

Sun. & mosl holidays Noon-5 00 p.m 

Snack Carts 

Sat. & Sun I l()()a.m.-4 oo p.m 



Entrances 

During Museum hours visitors can enter the 
building thnniqh the 7 , I train ■ . the 

parking lot entrance (81s\ Street), 01 the R< m i 
sevelt Memorial Hall entrance (79th Street ami 
Central Park West). Visitors attending pro- 
grams after hours can enter the building 
at 79th Street and Central Park West. 

Phone Numbers 

Museum information (212)769 'I' 111 

Membership information (for questions about 

Museum events) (212)769-5< 

Participating Members' Customer Servi. e 

(for questions and problems related to Rotunda 

and Natural History maga/.ine — missed Issues, 

address changes, and other 

information) . (800) 283-AMNH 

Planetarium information (212) 76 l ) 5900 

Education Department .(212) 769 >310 

Discovery Tours (212) 769-5700 

loll free outside NY State: (800) 462 8687 
Naruremax (212)769-5650 

Development/Public Affairs . . (2 1 2) 769 5270 

Volunteer Office (212) 769-5566 

Museum Shop (212)76*6150 

Library Services.. ,.(212)769-5400 

Natural History magazine (212) 769-5500 



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ME) 







For Participating and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



Vol. 20, No. 7 July/August 1995 




The purchase of Manhattan Island is 
among the subjects of a series of 
Members' walking tours that will take 
a new look at some familiar places and 
venture off the beaten path to explore 
several lesser-known resources. 

Use the coupon on page 5 to order 
tickets, which are available only by 
mail to Participating and Higher Mem- 
bers ages 16 and older. Details of 
other tours and day trips appear 
on pages 3 and 5. 

Members' Walking Tour 

Brooklyn and the 
Heights 

Tuesday, July 18 

Inspiring views of the Manhattan 
skyline await Members as they stroll 
the pedestrian promenade of Brooklyn 
Heights. BrookJynites have been look- 
ing across the East River since 
the area's original inhabitants, the 
Canarsee Indians, were displaced by 
Dutch settlers. The Dutch organized 
Breukelen into small towns — in- 
cluding Boswijck (Bushwick) and 
Vlackebos (Flatbush) — and the area 
became a popular suburban enclave 
during the early nineteenth century, 
when wealthy merchants and bankers 
took up residence and traveled by ferry 
to their work in Manhattan. 

James P. Shenton, professor of 
history at Columbia University, will 
lead this walking tour of the Brooklyn 
Heights area He'll point out numer- 
ous landmark buildings and describe 
the neighborhood's colorful history, 
from its sleepy seventeenth-century 
days as a rural sprawl of fishing and 
farming villages to the turbulent times 
of the Revolutionary War, when 
British troops forced Washington 



and his army to retreat to Manhattan. 
Shenton will also discuss Brooklyn's 
growth into the nation's third-largest 
industrial city by the mid-nineteenth 
century and the continuing appeal of 
its tree-lined streets and restored 
brownstones. 

The tours will take place from noon 
to 2:30 p.m. and from 4:00 to 6:30 
p.m. Tickets are $20. 

Members' Tour of the 

Brooklyn Botanic 
Garden 

Thursday, August 3 

One of America's foremost public 
gardens, the Brooklyn Botanic Garden 
contains a magnificent array of plant 
life and natural features, including a 
world-famous rose garden and conifer 
collection, a Japanese hill-and- 
pond garden and bonsai museum, and 
spectacular conservatories and lily 
ponds. Other highlights are a local 
flora section, featuring plants native 
within a 100-mile radius of New York 
City, and a dramatic terminal moraine 
with erratic boulders left over from the 
last Ice Age. 

Participants will meet at 1 100 a.m. 
in the garden, where they'll begin with 
Seasonal Highlights, a 90-minute 
guided tour. Afterward they can pur- 
chase lunch at the Terrace Cafe or 
eat their own bag lunches in nearby 
Prospect Park. 

After lunch Members will be treated 
to A History of Gardens and Garden- 
ing in New York, a slide-lecture by 
horticulturist Victoria Jahn. the gar- 
den's associate director of Information 
Services. The lecture will conclude at 
2:00 p.m.. and participants will be 
free to explore on their own until the 



garden closes at 6:00 p.m. Tickets are 
$25. 

Members' Walking Tour 

Before and After 
1624: The Dutch in 
New York 

Tuesday, August 15 

The first European settlers of New 
York, the seventeenth-century Dutch, 
constituted one of the great commer- 
cial powers of history. Although they 
left the area 300 years ago, the Dutch 
greatly influenced the architecture of 
lower Manhattan, and their worldview 
is an indelible part of the city. 

Participants in the walking tour , 
which will be led by historian Peter 
Laskowich. will trace the resources 
that assured New York's eventual 
greatness, and they'll learn how the 
Dutch treatment of those resources 
affects actions of the present. 

Tours will take place from 4:00 to 
5:30 p.m. and from 6:00 to 7:30 
p.m. Tickets are $20. 

Members' Day Trip to the 

Jacques Marchais 
Museum of Tibetan Art 

and the 

Richmondtown 
Restoration 
Historical Village 

Thursday, August 17 

A day trip to Staten Island will ex- 
plore a pair of local treasures: the 
Jacques Marchais Museum of Tibetan 



Art and ili-' Hi. hmondtown Restora- 
tion Historical Village. Participants will 
see a variety of Tibetan artforms (In- 
cluding metal figures of deities and 
lamas, thangka paintings, jewelry, and 
dance masks), and they'll learn about 
the history, agriculture, commerce, 
and maritime life of Staten Island from 
the seventeenth century onward. 

The Jacques Marchais Museum of 
Tibetan Art (also known as the Tibetan 
Museum) is designed like a small Ti- 
betan mountain temple tucked away 
from the world. Terraced sculpture 
gardens, a lily and fish pond, and a 
distant view of the Lower Bay con- 
tribute toward an atmosphere of 
serenity and beauty. The collections 
on display are Tibetan, Tibeto- 
Chinese, Nepalese, and Mongolian in 
origin and date primarily from the 
seventeenth to nineteenth centuries 
and earlier. Exhibits include jewel- 
encrusted Nepalese metalwork, a set 
of ■silver < .'lemonial implements used 
by a previous Pane hen Lama 
(1883-1937), and other items that 
have never before been on display. 

After a guided tour at the Tibetan 
Museum, participants will travel the 
short di' i the Richmondtown 

Restoration. They'll be greeted by 
costumed guides, who will talk to them 
about the restoration's re-creation of a 
rural Staten Island community. 
Twenty-seven historic buildings, many 
of which have been restored and flu 
nished, illustrate the evolution of Rich- 
mond from its beginnings in 1 1 
1 600s as a rural crossroads through its 
development as a county seat and its 
incorporation as a borough of New 
York City 

The day trip will take place from 
8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., transporta- 
tion is by bus from the Museum. Tick- 
ets are $50. 












Spell of the Tiger 

Thursday, July 13 



Spell of the Tiger offers a 
look at the deadliest tigers on 
earth, the people who live 
among them, and a tropical 
world rich with myths, magic. 




and mystery. Author Sy Mont- 
gomery will tell the true story 
of a unique population of wild 
tigers that thrives because 
their human neighbors regard 
them as magical rulers of an 
enchanted land. 

Sundarbans (pronounced 
SHUN-der-buns), the world's 
largest mangrove swamp, 
stretches between India and 
Bangladesh along the Bay 
of Bengal. Its tigers are 
formidable hunters that swim 
after boats, hunt by day as 
well as by night, and kill 
scores of people each year 
The maneaters seem to re- 
spect their prey, avoiding eye 
contact and declining to attack 
when their victims are facing 
them. For a while the tigers 
were deterred when people 
who ventured into the forest 
wore masks on the backs of 
their heads. But mostly, the 
people of Sundarbans protect 
themselves by prayer For if 
the tiger respects its victim, 
the feeling is mutual. The 
people of Sundarbans fear the 
tiger but do not hate or hunt 
it; instead, Hindus and 



Moslems worship it side by 
side. The maneater is known 
by the name of Daksin Ray, 
the warrior tiger god and lord 
of the region. 

Montgomery's lecture is 
based on her new book Spell 
of the Tiger (Houghton Mif- 
flin Co.). praised in a New 
York Times book review as 
"fascinating" and "moving.'' 
Her research involved three 
trips to India and Bangladesh, 
where she lived among the 
natives of Sundarbans and 
tracked tigers in the forest. 
Montgomery is also the au- 
thor of Walking with the 
Great Apes Jane Goodall. 
Dian Fossey. and Birute 
Galdikas Copies of Spell of 
the Tiger will be available for 
purchase at the program, and 
there will be a book-signing 
after the show. 

The program will take 
place at 7:00 p.m. in the 
Kaufmann Theater. Tickets 
are $8 for Members and $12 
for non-Members. Use the 
July/August Members' pro- 
grams coupon on page 3 to 
register. 



Summer Workshops for Children 

August 7-1 1 



ung Members can spend 
., summei morning al the 
Museum where naturalist 
Inn. Myles will show them 
some exhibits introduce 
them i" some fun facts, and 
h,.| r , them make an arts-and- 
. mil, item to take home 
l | M ' workshops, which are 
id toward i hlldren be- 
tween the iqes of 6 and 9, 
will take place from 10:30 
a.m to noon Tickets are $18 
each and available only by 
m, nl to Participating and 
I holier Members. Use the 
Workshops coupon on page 
3 to regisw i 

Long in the Tooth. Mon- 
day, August 7 We'll take ade 
quate precautions to avoid the 

I, , ,| 1 1 iv l. ill and the 
gnashing of teeth when we 
Isll the caniosaurs ("flesh 
lizards") in theil new home. 
They were massive bul were 
they quick? Are birds their 



living relatives? If so, why are 
birds so small 9 These are 
some of the puzzles we'll 
tackle Then we'll make a 
tooth that will keep the tooth 
fairy jumping! 

Frills and Bills, Horns and 
Plates. Tuesday, August 8. 
We're safe to wander through 
this neighborhood since the 
i imithischians were plant 
eaters We II examine the 
necessity of their add-ons — 
frills and bills — and we'll 
try to understand what all 
these odd-looking creatures 
had in common. Then we'll 
construct one to take home — 
a well-known extinct species 
or perhaps a new discovery. 
But Before There Were 
Dinosaurs. Wednesday. Au- 
gust 9. There were BUGS! 
Big bugs! And they just keep 
coming. There are more of 
these little animals than any 
other creatures — probably 



more than 200,000 insects 
for every one of us — and 
many of them haven't even 
been identified yet. We'll 
look at fossil insects, en- 
larged insects, and everyday 
insects, and we'll make a 
bug pet to take home. 

What's the Point? 
Thursday, August 10. Sur- 
vival is usually the point, 
and we'll search the mu- 
seum for all sorts of organ- 
Isms that "got the point 
Then we*ll try to figure out 
how their adaptations 
helped in their survival, and 
we'll use some of these 
points to create a print. 

Snakes Alive! Friday, 
August 11 We'll take a 
look at the snakes in the 
Hall of Reptiles and Am- 
phibians, and then we'll 
fashion some serpents of 
our own to take home — 
garden variety or exotics. 



The Fossil Trail 

Thursday, July 6 



In one of the Hall of 
I I n man Biology and Evolu- 
tion's dioramas a 3 million- 
year-old pair of our ancest< n S 
... ,,||, side by side I hiough a 

snowy landscape of volcanic 

ash They're hairy and ape- 
hi., bni they re unmistakably 
human. 

Thedioram ised on 

a 19' I dls overy of f < 
footprints hi Laetoli. I an 
nia I |i iv. did the diorama's 
itors know whal these 
mi, ins, looked like and 
hov lists re< i 

sink t< d - long ji ii 

in steps 



to where we stand today? In 
short, how do we know what 
we think we know about 
human evolution? 

Anthropologist Ian Tatter- 
sall will explain at The Fossil 
Trail, an examination of the 
study of human evolution that 
will feature highlights from 
the i olorful history of fossil 
discoveries and an insider's 
look at how these finds have 
been interpreted — and mis 
ted ihrough tin 

Chairman and curatoi in 

opol- 
I.iii Tattersall wa 
charge of the design and 



cution of the Hall of Human 
Biology and Evolution, which 
opened in 1993. The Fossil 
Trail is presented in conjunc- 
tion with the publication by 
Oxford University Press of his 
book of the same name. The 
book will be available for 
purchase at the show, and 
Tattersall will sign copies 
afterward. 

The program will take 
place at 7 00 p.m In the 
Kaufmann Theater Tick* 
are $6 for Members and $9 
for non-Membc he 

Members' programs coupon 
on page 3 to reg: 



Members' Fossil Casting Workshop 

Dinosaurs in Relief 

Saturday, July 22 



Members will use teeth and 
tails, claws or jaws, chevrons, 
skin patches, and other dino- 
saurian parts to create their 
own professional-quality fossil 
collage. Participants will 
leam the techniques used by 
Museum artisans at this work- 
shop, where they'll design 
their own low-relief dinosaur 
sculptures 

Participants will make a 
mold and pour casts to create 
a 3-D montage of dinosaur 
parts. They'll work under the 
tutelage of Pamela Popeson, 



who has been working with 
artifacts and fine art objects 
for more than 16 years She 
is currently a master crafts- 
man at the Museum, where 
she makes molds and casts of 
specimens for the reproduc- 
tion studio. 

The workshop will take 
place from 10:00 a.m. to 
1:00 p.m. Tickets are $50 
and available only by mail to 
Participating and Higher 
Members ages 12 and older. 
Use the coupon on page 5 to 
register. 



Members 9 Guided Tours 



Fiction, folklore, and fact 
are interwoven in a fascinating 
series of Museum tours. The 
following special tours will be 
conducted by Volunteer High- 
lights Tour guide Robert Cam- 
panile. All tours will begin at 
630 p.m. Call (212) 769- 
5547 to register 

Journey to the Center of 




The Equator: 
A Galapagos scene 



the Earth. Friday, July 14 
A journey once made in 
science fiction can now be 
made in science fact when 
participants retrace the steps 
of a Jules Verne novel 
through Museum exhibits. 
Readings from Journey to the 
Center of the Earth are com- 
bined with the reality of sci- 
ence to show how facts can 
be as exciting as fiction. 

The Equator. Friday, Au- 
gust 18. Participants will circle 
the equator on a journey of 
nearly 25,000 miles. The 
weather: hot, wet to chilly, 
dry, and even snowy. The 
wildlife: 500-pound turtles to 
inflatable birds. The land: flat 
grasslands and volcanic is- 
lands. The people: Asians, 
Africans, South Americans, 
and Pacific Islanders. 

King of the Wild Frontier. 
Friday, September 15. Ex- 
plore the life and times of 
an American folk hero — 
Davy Crockett. King of the 
Wild Frontier. Strange and 
interesting folklore about the 
wildlife of Davy's times will be 
related in an exciting mosaic 
of frontier life. 




ISSN 0194-6110 

Vol. 20, No. 7 
July/ August 1995 

Donna Bell — Editor 

Sheila Greenberg — Associate Director of Membership Services 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Traci Buckner — Assistant Manager 

Robert Jahn — Program Coordinator 

Peter Zelaya — Special Projects Coordinator 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and Higher 
Members of the American Museum of Natural History, is 
published monthly September through June, bimonthly July an 
August. Publication offices are at Natural History magazine. 
American Museum of Natural History. Central Park West at n 
Street, New York, NY 10024-5192. Telephone: (212) 769- 
5606 Subscriptions: $50 a year for Participating Membership. 
$100 a year for Contributor Membership. 
© 1995 American Museum of Natural History. Second-class 
postage paid at New York. NY Postmaster Please send addre» 
changes to: Rotunda. Membership Office, American Mu- 
Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street. New > 
NY 10024-5192 



.ed by Waldon Press. Inc.. New York 






Trekking the Urban Wilds 



Geologist Sidney Horen- 
stein will take Members for a 
look at three places that are 
not only geographically dis- 
tant but also offer the widest 
representation of the city's 
landscapes. 

Horenstein, who is the 
Museum's coordinator of en- 
vironmental public programs, 
will lead the two-hour tours. 
They'll take place at 4:00 and 
6:00 p.m. Use the coupon 
on page 5, and be sure to 
indicate the name of the tour, 
the date, and a preferred 
time. Tickets are $20 for 
each tour or $50 for all three 
tours and available only by 
mail to Participating and 
Higher Members. 

Foley Square: An 
Urban Center. Tuesday, 
August 22. Once the site of a 
pond, Foley Square has few 
indications of its heritage. 
This trip explores the geo- 
logic history of the area and 
its vestiges of nature. 

Northern Central 
Park: An Altered Land- 
scape. Wednesday, August 
23. Even though its surface 
has been altered, Central 
Park retains some of New 
York's original landscape 
features. The park's northern 
end holds many surprises. 



Inwood Hill Park: Park Participants on this 

Nature at Its Best. Thurs- walking tour will see Indian 

day, August 24. The last of shell middens and vistas of 

Manhattan Island's remaining northern Manhattan, the 

woodland is within Inwood Bronx, and the Hudson. 




I 



Clearwater Sail 



Wednesday, August 30 

1:00-4:00 p.m. 

$50, and open only to Participating and Higher Members 




Come aboard for a Hudson River cruise 



Help hoist the sales on a 
replica of a vessel that linked 
the communities on the Hud- 
son River during the eigh- 
teenth and nineteenth 
centuries. Members can spend 
a summer afternoon aboard a 
Clearwater vessel, where the 
crew will discuss the Hudson's 
ecology and the problems 
arising when ecological rela- 



tionships are ignored. They'll 
show how the environment 
might be made cleaner, 
healthier, and more produc- 
tive, and they'll illustrate life 
within the river with the ves- 
sel's nets and other equip- 
ment. 

Sailors must be at least a 
years old: children under that 
age will not be permitted 



aboard. Be sure your clothes 
are warm and casual (soft- 
soled, flat-heeled shoes are 
advised). This cruise is an 
environmental excursion, not 
a learn-how-to-sail trip: partic- 
ipants are confined to four 
tickets per request. Tickets are 
available only by mail order; 
use the coupon on page 5 to 
register. 



July/August 
Members' 
Programs Coupon 



Name.. 



Address: 
City: 



_State: 



-Zip: 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: 



Total amount enclosed: 



Please make check (if applicable) payable to the American 
Museum of Natural History and mail With .> self- 
addressed, stamped envelope to July/August 
Members' Programs. Membership Office, A 
Museum of Natural Hist utral Park West at 70th 

Street, New York, NY 10024-5192 Telephone 
reservations are not accepted. No refunds or 
exchanges. 

Unless otherwise Indicated, no more than eight 
tickets may be ordered for a program. Participating 
Members are entitled to four tickets per program at 
the Members' price. Higher Members are entitled 
to six tickets, and Associate Members are entitled 
to one ticket. 

The Fossil Trail. Thursday, July 6. 7:00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $6: 

Number of additional tickets at $9: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Spell of the Tiger. Thursday, July 13. 7 00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $8: 

Number of additional tickets at $12: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Ancestral Passions: The Leakey Family. Thui A> 

September 7. 7:00 p.m. 

Number of Members" tickets at $5- 

Number of additional tickets at $8: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

NOTE: Orders received less than ten days before 
show dates will be held for pick-up at the door on 
the day of the program if tickets are still available. 
If an event is sold out, you will be advised in writing 
or by phone and your check will be returned. 









• 



I 






Summer Workshops for Children. Please indicate 
number of tickets for each workshop Tickets are $18 
each. 



Long in the Tooth, Aug. 7: 

Fri//s and Bills, Aug. 8: 

But Before Dinosaurs. Aug. 9: 

What's the Point?, Aug. 10: 

Snakes Alive. Aug. 11: 

Total amount enclosed: 



Name:. 



Addi> 





State 



^ip:. 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: 



Please make check payable to the American Museum of 
Natural History and in.nl with a self -addressed, stamped 
envelope to: Summer Workshops, Membership Office, 
American Museum of Natural History, Cenir„l Park West at 
79th Street. New York, NY 10024 f.192. 






Admission 
Price Changes 

1 1 iese price changes will be 
effective Saturday, July 1 As 
always. Members will be ad- 
mitted to the Museum free. 

Inf( irmatii »n on combina- 
tion tii kel pri< es will be avail 
able soon 





Mil 


Members (adults) 


Free 


Members (children) 


Free 


Non-Members (adults) 


$7 


Non-Members (children) 


$4 


Seniors/Students 


$5 




IMAX 


Planetarium 


$5 


$5 


$3 


$3 


$7 


$7 


$4 


$4 


$5 


$5 



Flora 
Portrayed 



One hundred and 
thirty-six botanical illus- 
trations from Carnegie- 
Mellon University's 
Hunt Institute will be on 
display in Gallery 77 
from Friday, July 14, 
through the end of De- 
cember. Flora Portrayed 
features works ranging 
from the development of 
modern botany in the 
Renaissance to the 
twentieth century. 



Fall Education Department Field Trips 



1 1 ie following programs are 
sponsored by the Department 
of Education. To register, send 
vi hi i hei I. | Livable to the 
American Museum of Nairn. 1 1 
I listi iry .md mail with a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope 
1. 1 l'\eld Trips, Education 
1 1. | mi in i.i ii American Mu- 
seum of Natural History, Cen- 
tral Park Wesl al 79th Street. 
New York, NY 10024-5192 
urc i' i indicate the title of 
the dp igram and number of 
tickets II you wish to charge 
to a Mastercard or Visa ac- 
i • >uni in. lu. i«- the ai counl 
number and expiration date 

Call (212) 769-5310 for 
lurther information. 

Fall Bird Walks in 
Central Park 

Observe the autumn migra- 
tion of birds through Central 
Park with naturalists Stephen 
C. Quinn (Tuesdays) and 
Harold Feinberg (Thursd<>> 
Leam how to use field marks, 
habitat, behavior, and song as 
aids in bird identification. Par- 
ticipants meet on the north- 
east comer of Central Park 
West and 77th Street Nine 
I uesdays, Sepl 5-Oct. 31. 
7:00-9:00 a in . $50 Etghl 
Thursdays. Sept 7 -Oct 26. 
9:00-11:00 a.m.. $44 For 
availability of individual 
walks, please call (212) 769 
5310 one week in advance to 
make reservations Limited 
to 25 people. 

Fall Botany Walking Tours 
in Central Park 

Participants will observe 
is i 'I autumn In the flov 

and I iees dunng a two-hour 
in- >i i nng walk in Central Park. 
They'll leam about plant iden- 
ul nation and ecology from 




Hudson River Lighthouse Explorations 



William Schiller, lecturer in 
botany in the Department of 
Education. Saturdays. Sept. 
23 or Oct 7. or Wed.. Oct 
11, 9 00-1 1:00 a.m. $9 per 
walk, indicate date when 
ordering tickets Limited to 
25 people. 

Fall Cape May Birding 
Weekend 

Join Museum naturalists for 
a weekend of birding at Cape 
May, New Jersey, one of the 
world's bird-watching hot 
spots. The trip includes natu- 
ralist-led walks, informal lec- 
tures, a stop at the famed 
Brigantine National Wildlife 
Refuge, and two boat excur- 
sions to observe seabirds and 
possibly whales and dolphins 

Fee includes accommoda- 
tions, food, and transport. i 
tion Trip leaders are Brad 
Bumham. a natural science 
instructor in the Educatu n I 
Department, and Stephen C 
Quinn. naturalist and expen- 
enced birder Fri.Sun .. Oct 



20-22. $350 per person 
(double occupancy). 
Limited to 45 adults. Call 
(212) 769-5310 for itinerary 
and application. 

Hudson River Lighthouse 
Explorations 

Visit the Tarrytown Light- 
house with educator Christo- 
pher Letts of the Hudson 
River Foundation. Explore the 
lighthouse and leam about 
past and present river naviga- 
tion, the lives of lighthouse 
families, and the natural his- 
tory of estuarine systems. 

After the lighthouse visit, 
participants will investigate 
problems of river ecology 
through simulated oil spills, 
water pollution clean-up activi- 
ties, and study of riverine or- 
ganisms. Uta Gore, senior 
instructor in the Department 
of Education, leads this explo- 
ration in ecology Bring a box 
lunch. Saturday, Oct. 14. 
8 30 a m -500 p.m. $50 
Limited to 25 participants 



Is New York 
City's Water 
Safe to Drink? 

Wednesday, September 27 

6:30 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$5 for Members, $8 for non-Members 



Because of numerous ques- 
tions about the quality of New 
York City s drinking water, the 
City Club of New York invited 
a panel of independent ex- 
perts to compile a status re- 
port on the safety of tap 
water. After months of re- 
search, review of reports, and 
dozens of interviews, the 
panel will present its final 
report. 

The panel also evaluated 
the safety of substitute sources 
of water (e.g., bottled water 
and soft drinks) and of home 
filters and purifiers as well as 
the threat of the parasite 
Cryptosporidium to immune- 
suppressed individuals. 'After 
the presentation of the report 
the meeting will be open to 
questions and discussion from 
the audience. 



The panelists are Edward 
Gershey, the New York 
Academy of Medicine; David 
Locke, the New York 
Academy of Science; and 
Sidney Horenstein, Amencan 
Museum of Natural History 

To order tickets send your 
check payable to the Ameri- 
can Museum of Natural His- 
tory and a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to: Water. 
Environmental Programs. 
American Museum of Natural 
History. Central Park West 
at 79th Street, New York, NY 
10024-5192. Be sure to in- 
clude a separate sheet of 
paper on which you've indi- 
cated your name, address 
daytime telephone number, 
number of tickets, and amount 
of the check. Call (212) 769- 
5750 for further information. 



Ancestral Passions 

The Leakey Family and the 

Quest for Humankind's Beginnings 

Thursday, September 7 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$5 for Members, $8 for non-Members 



Because their discoveries 
laid the foundations for much 
of what we know about human 
origins, the Leakeys — Louis. 
Mary, and Richard — are 
renowned as the first family of 
anthropology. Each of the 
family made key fossil discover- 
ies; Louis, in particular, laid the 
theoretical groundwork for the 
science of paleoanthropology 
by arguing that human life did 
not originate on the Eurasian 
continent tens of thousands of 
years ago but likely evolved in 
Africa millions of years ago. 

Members can hear about 
this fascinating family and their 
work at a presentation by Vir- 
ginia Morell. who has written 
the family's first full biography, 
Ancestral Passions (Simon 
and Schuster, 1995). She'll 
discuss the Leakeys many 
significant finds as they pushed 



back the scope of human an- 
cestry and articulated our rela- 
tionship to the other primates, 
especially early hominids. 
Morell will talk about the jeal- 
ousies between these three 
forceful figures as well as their 
rivalries with other scientists. 
She'll also describe how the 
Leakeys fostered the work of 
other researchers, including 
the pioneering studies of 
Louis's most famous 
protegees, Jane Goodall. 
Birute Galdikas, and Dian 
Fossey. 

A science writer whose work 
has appeared in Discover, 
Science. The New York 
Times Magazine, and other 
publications, Morell will sign 
copies of her new book after 
the program. Use the pro- 
grams coupon on page 3 to 
register. 



Two New Movies at the IMAX Theater 



On July 1 two new movies 
will premiere in the IMAX 
Theater: Destiny in Space 
Titanica. Narrated by 
Leonard Nimoy. Destiny in 
Space focuses on the intricate 
partnership of humans and 
robots in the future of space 
exploration. It is the newest 
feature in the trilogy that 
includes The Dream Is Alive 
and Blue Planet. Titanica. 
which was shot during an 
international scientific expedi- 
takes audiences 12,500 
feet beneath the murky North 
Atlantic to the haunting site 
of the wreck of the Titanic. 

Showtimes for Destiny in 
Space are 10:30 and 11 30 
a in and 1:30 and 3 30 p.m. 
daily. Titanica is shown at 
12:30, 2.30. and 430 p.m. 
On Friday and Saturday at 
6 00 and 7:30 p.m the films 
are shown on a double-fea- 
ture bill. Double-feature tick- 
ets are also available during 
the day. Each film is 40 min- 
utes long. 

Admission for Participating 
and Higher Members is $5 
tor adults and $3 for children. 
Schedules and prices are sub- 
ject to change without notice. 
Call (212) 769-5650 for fur- 
ther information, including 
double-feature prices 




Members' Walking Tour 

The Genius and Elegance 
of Gramercy Park 

Saturday, July 15 
11:00 a.m.-2:00 p.m. 
$25, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 



This landmark district 
started out as marshland and 
wound up as home to some of 
America's greatest inventors, 
architects, and actors. Mem- 
bers can explore the 
Gramercy Park area with 
historian Joyce Gold, who'll 
point out the nineteenth-cen- 



tury homes of Peter Cooper. 
Edwin Booth, and Stanford 
White. She'll also discuss 
other past residents — doc- 
tors, diarists, publishers, writ- 
ers, painters, losing and 
winning presidential candi- 
dates, and a witch. 

Joyce Gold teaches history 



at New York University and 
the New School for Social 
Research Participants will 
meet in front of the Gramercy 
Park Hotel on Lexington Av 
enue and 21st Street. Use the 
coupon on this page to n 
ter; tickets are available only 
by mail. 



Members' Day Trip to a 

Pennsylvania Coal Mine 

Tuesday, July 25 
7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. 
$65, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 
Ages 16 and older 



Members can explore some 
of the Northeast's major geo- 
logical provinces with Sidney 
Horenstein, the Museum's 
coordinator of environmental 
public programs 

They'll board a bus at the 
Museum and travel across 



New Jersey to the spectacular 
Delaware Water Gap. The 
journey continues across 
Pennsylvania's Appalachians, 
where the group will board 
coal trains and enter both 
subsurface and open-pit 
mines. Retired coal miners will 



be on hand to discuss their 
experiences The final stop is 
for a short walk along a 
wooded path to collect plant 
fossils. 

Use the coupon on i 
page to register; tickets are 
available only by mail 



Members' Day Trip 

How Water Works 

New York City's Water Supply 
and Pollution Control Systems 

Thursday, July 20 
8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 
$50, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 



Members can observ. i 
paragon of modem-cii 
neering on a tour of the N> 
York City water suppt] 
which provides the besl qu 
municipal water In the world 
Participants can learn about 
the current system .is well as 
the city's planned improve- 
ments for the future I low the 
city treats its waste water ai id 
storm flow will also be si v 

The trip will begin w ill i .hi 
extensive tour of the Ward 
d Pollution Control PI 
From there Members 
to the Bronx for a toui ol the 
Jerome Park Reservoir and 
Pilot Filtration Plant. 

The tours will view pari "1 
the Third Water Tunnel in the 
Bronx, and Members will de 
scend more than •' ,, i ' '<'« , i 
below Van Cortlandt Park to 
observe the internal water 



works. The trip will com lud 
Millview Reservotl 

Represeni.it: the 

.i i rw Ironmental 
be onl 
at all plain 

ind 
Sidney I lorensteln the Mu 

. ordlnati n ol envin in 
mental publli programs will 

the tours from tort to 
finish. 

nek .0 each. I Ik' 

fO] this |>" "ti.im ."' I' 'i 

transport.it i« n 
presenter! ins • inly there I 
admission i h 

the sites N<> focxi will be j 

able on the tours, so be sure to 

briny .» I mo Iuil I. 
age--. Partii ipants mu tbe L6 
and oldei Usethi i "Upon on 
this page to regtstei •md 

please note thai H< I ets ire 

available only by mall 



1 



<f ' 



Tours. Day Trips, and Workshops. 

to register for Dinosaur In RelU I How WaU i Works 
the Coal Mine trip. Trekking the Urban Wilds (Indli ate 
name of tour and preferred time). C/. ■<■,.■. ill the trip 

to the Tibetan Museum and Richmondtown, the tour of 
the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, and the walking toll] 
Brooklyn and the Heights. The Dutch in New York and 
Gramercy Park 



Name(s) of program(s): 



Number of tickets and price (please indicate which pro- 
gram if more than one): 



Total amount enclosed:. 



Name: 



Address: 
City: 



State: 



.Zip: 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: 

Please make check payable to the American Museum of 
Natural History and mail with a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to Tours and Work§ho\ 

Membership Office. American Museum of Natural 
History. Central Park West at 79th Street. New York, 
NY 10024-5192. 



J 






Christmas in the Caribbean 




This holiday season a team 
of lee hirers from the American 
Museum will lead a voyage of 
dlso rvery aboard the elegant 
four-masted tall ship Star Clip- 
per. They'll cruise among the 
Lesser Antilles of the 
Caribbean from December 23 
to 30 in a leisurely exploration 
of some of the worlds most 
beautiful watet ["he ^hip. 
which will one hoi In secluded 
coves and <mi ■ >l the- way mari- 
nas, was built in 1991 in the 
tradition of the graceful ( 0] i 
per* of the nineteenth century 
Most of the time at sea will be 
spent under sail, with 36.000 



The tall ship Star Clipper 



square feet of canvas billowing 
overhead as the predominant 
northeast trade winds of the 
region propel the vessel. 

Traveling by ship is the per- 
fect way to experience the 
natural wonders of the 
Caribbean. Some of the high- 
lights include the rain forests of 
Grenada, the volcanic peaks of 
St. Lucia, and the spectacular 
coral reefs of the Grenadines. 
Participants will snorkel from 
an uninhabited island and 
swim in the crystalline shallow 
pools below the Falls of 
Baleine on St. Vincent. 

This cruise has been attrac- 



tively priced so that the whole 
family can explore the Carib- 
bean together However, 
space is extremely limited, so 
please call immediately if you 
are interested. Prices are 
$2,150-$3,250peradult. 
double occupancy; $1,895 per 
child under 18 sharing with an 
adult; and $855 for a third 
person sharing a cabin; airfare 
is additional. 

For more information about 
this cruise, call Discovery 
Tours at (800) 462-8687 or in 
New York State at (212) 769- 
5700, Monday-Friday, 9;00 
a.m. -5:00 p.m. 



Art in the Service of Science 

A New Exhibition in the Library Gallery 



When Sir Stamford Raff I.- 
founder of Singa] >• 
returned to Englai wl in 1X24. 
he soughl to i ontlnui his 
activities as an amateur natu- 
ralist but found no suitable 
venue or collection in whit h 
to pursue his Interests He 
tiu'iefore organized the Zoo- 

at Sociei> i 
the purp irmlng a gen- 

eral zoological coll. . Hon <ind 
to Introduce and dom- 
neu .tnd varieties of 

animals. 

I lu Zoological Society of 
London was i lettered in 
1826 with Sii Stamford as 
president and mam i utstand 

ientists as members. 
Regular i u ported the 

latest zoologinl findings, dis 
coveries, and acquisitions, and 
the SOI letj inaugurated two 
periodicals the / 

833 and the Transactions 
in L835 In order to provide 
mon d( tailed d( » riptii in 
the soi u iv began publish! 
accompanying hand-colored 
lithograph!! lllustratioi 
1848. 




An 1890 hand-colored lithograph of 
Euchoreutes naso, a long-eared jerboa, by Joseph Sin it 



I his i KhibiUon offers a brief 
history ol the founding and 
organization of the Zoological 
Society and biographical 
sketches and portraits of the 
scientific and .nt isiu luminar- 

: ited with ii Such 
emlnenl a Ientists as Sir 
Humphry Davy. Thomas 
Horsfield. and Sii Richard 
Owen presented reports at 



the society's scientific meet- 
Ings A selection of zoological 
illustrations by Mich notable 
artists as Joseph Wolf, John 
Gould. Joseph Smit, and Ed- 
ward Lear will be on v. i 

The Library Gallery is lo- 
cated on the fourth floor and 
is open during Monday 
through Friday, from Id do 
a.m. until 5 00 p m 



A Call 

to 

Teach 



Each year thousands of 
schoolchildren visit the Mu- 
seum. We need you as a 
teaching volunteer to answer 
children's questions and add 
to their sense of wonder about 
the world. Teaching volun- 
teers work with classes on 



schoolday mornings. Previous 
teaching experience is not 
required; we will train you. 
The next teaching volunteer 
training program starts this 
fall. 

Call (212) 769-5566 for an 
application. 



From the Volunteer 
Department 



A Planet-Walk through 
the Solar System: The 
Earth as a Peppercorn 

It s difficult to picture the 
dimensions of the solar system 
— the planets are relatively 
small and distances between 
them almost absurdly great. 
For a model whose scale is true 
to size and distance, it's neces- 
sary to step outside. 

A 1.000-yard model of the 
solar system, the planet-walk 
was devised in 1969 by as- 
tronomer and teacher Guy 
Ottewell. The walk begins on 
the Planetarium's front steps at 
81st Street, where volunteer 
tour leader Robert Campanile 
will take participants on a jour- 
ney of discovery that covers 
the universe. 

The walk will take place at 
100 p.m. on Sunday, July 16. 
For reservations and further 



information about this free 
tour, call the Volunteer Office 
at (212) 769-5566. 

White Days, 
White Nights 

Remote, desolate, forbidding 
— the poles were one of 
earth's last frontiers. Today 
they still exert a powerful hold 
on the imagination. These 
guided tours at the Museum 
will examine the regions' land 
and the animals as well as the 
people who explored, con- 
quered, and banded together 
to protect the polar regions 

Tours will take place on 
Saturday. July 29, and Satur- 
day, August 5, at 400 p.m. 
Tour guides are Robert Cam- 
panile and Phil Sollecito. No 
registration is necessary; meet 
at the information desk in the 
second-floor Rotunda 



Members 9 Birthday Parties 
at the Museum 



Your child can play pin the 
tail on the Stegosaurus. make 
a "fossil" to take home, and 
enjoy the happiest of birth- 
days among the world's big- 
gest and best dinosaurs. The 
dinosaur party, like all the 
Museum birthday parties, 
combines a tour of the exhibi- 
tion halls with games and 
crafts aciiviiH 

Other theme parties for 
Members between the ages 
of 5 and 10 focus on fossil 
mammals, African mammals, 
reptiles and amphibians, 
ocean dwellers, and Native 
Americans 

The group should be no 



fewer than 10 and no more 
than 20 The fee is $300 plus 
$15 per child and covers all 
materials and the services of 
a Museum party coordinator 
The coordinator will help you 
plan a party that suits your 
child's tastes and will handle 
everything from candles to 
party favors All you need to 
do is bring the cake and help 
escort the guests. The parties, 
which are two hours long, are 
available only to Members at 
the Contributor ($100) and 
higher levels 

For more information 
about the children's birthday 
parties call (212) 769-5542. 



The Membership Off.ce would like to thank the followtng young Members 
.rthdavs Hon recently Sarah Taub. Alexander KaU. 
Willie Herbsi Alexandra Mo* Tyler Gould, and Peler Ash 



Museum Notes 



Hours 

Exhibition Halls 

Mon.-Thurs. & Sun 10:00 a.m. -5:45 p.m. 

Fri.&Sat 10:00 a.m.-845 p.m. 

The Museum Shop 

Mon.-Thurs. & Sun 10:00 a.m. -5:45 p.m. 

Fri & Sat 10:00 a.m. -7:45 p.m. 

The Junior Shop 

Mon -Fri 10:00 a.m. -4:45 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun 10:00 a m -545 p.m 

The Museum Library 

Tues-Fn 11:00 a.m. -4:00 p.m. 

The Natural Science Center 

For children of all ages and their families 
Closed on Mondays and holidays. The following 
hours are in effect July 10-August 26. The 
Natural Science Center will be closed for the 
month of September. 

Tues-Fri 10:30a.m.-12:30p.m. 

& 2:00^1:30 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun. 1 00^1:30 p.m. 

The Discovery Room 

Passes are distributed at the first-floor informa- 
tion desk beginning at 11.45 a.m. Ages 5-15. 
Children must be accompanied by an adult 
Closed on holidays and weekdays. 

Sat. & Sun Noon-4.30 p.m. 




Museum Dining 

Diner Saurus Fast Service Eatery 

Daily 11:00 a.m.-445 p.m. 

Garden Cafe 

Reservations: (212) 769-5865 

Lunch: Mon.-Fn ...11:30 a.m. -3. 30 p.m. 

Dinner: Fri. & Sat. 5:00-7:30 p.m. 

Brunch. Sat. & Sun 11 00 a.m.-4-.OO p.m. 

Whale's Lair 

Fri 3.00-8:00 p.m. 

Sat Noon-8:00 p.m. 

Sun. & most holidays Noon-5:00 p.m 

Snack Carts 

Sat. & Sun 11:00 a.m.-400 p.m. 

itffffllll 




The world's largest collection 
of dinosaurs in on display in 
the Museum's two new halls. 
Among the spectacular exhibits 
are a modified Tyrannosarus rex 
(left) and an Allosaurus feeding 
on an Apatosaurus (below). 



Entrances 

During Museum hours visitors can enter the 

building thn>ugh the 77th Street entrance, the 
parking lot entrance (81st Street oi tin- !<>»> 
sevelt Memorial Hall entrance (79th Street and 
Central Park West) Visitors attending pro- 
grams after hours can enter the building at 
79th Street and Central Park West. 

Phone Numbers 

Museum Information (212)769-5100 

Membership information (for questions about 

Museum events) (212) 7<>9 5606 

Participating Members' Customer Sen 

(for questions and problems related to K< >tund.i 

and Natm.il I hstory magazine — missed Issn 

address changes, and Othe\ 

information) . (800) 283 AMNI 1 

Planetarium information (212) 769 5900 

Education Department (212) /<>'» 5310 

Discovery Tours (212)769-5700 

toll-free outside NY State: (8<)< n 1< .:* 
Naturemax (212) "'>5650 

Development/Public Affairs (2 1 2) 769-52 1 1 

Volunteei I Ifflce (212)769 5566 

MuseumShop (212) 769 150 

I ,l>rary Services 

Natural History magazine (212)769 »500 

Members Book Program ... -00 

Members' Birthday Parties [2 1 2) 7( ■ 



Happenings at the Hayden 



Sky Show 



The Ten Most-Asked Questions about 
the Universe 

What is a black hole? Is there life elsewhere in 
the universe? How will the universe end? This Sky 
Show answers these and other frequently asked 
questions about space. 



Showtimes: 
Mon. -Fri. . . 
Sat. and Sun. 



1.30 and 3:30 p.m. 

1:00,2:00.3:00 

and 400 p.m 



Admission (Participating and Higher Members) 
Adults: $5 
Children (2-12): $3 

Call (212) 769-5100 for additional information 
and non-Members' prices. Please note that prices 
are subject to change without prior notice 

Exhibition 

The Universe Revealed: Recent Images 
from the Hubble Space Telescope 

This exhibition features photographs of recent 
discoveries made by the Hubble Space Telescope. 
ini luding the M87 galaxy (which proves the exis- 
tence of black holes) and images of the Shoemaker- 
Levy 9 comet strikes on Jupiter. A 1 : 15 scale model 
of the Space Shuttle Orbiter deploying the Hubble is 
on display, along with a scale model of the Optical 
-ope Assembly of the Hubble Space Telescope 
and a video of the rep ion of December 1993. 

On display through September 4 



Children's Shows 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers. Children sing along with images of 
their favorite Sesame Street Muppets as they learn 
about rainbows, the phases of the moon, sunsets, 
and stars. Sat., July 8. at 10:30 a.m.; Sat.. Aug. 5, 
at 1030 and 1145 a.m.; and Sat.. Sept. 9. at 
10:30 a.m. Admission for Participating and Higher 
Members is $5 for adults and $3 for children. 
Members can purchase up to four tickets at the 
Members' price. 

Shows usually sell out in advance; reservations, by 
mail only, are necessary. Orders must be received 
two weeks prior to show date. Make your check 
payable to the Hayden Planetarium (attn: Wonderful 
Sky. Central Park West at 81st Street. New York, 
NY 10024-5192). indicate membership category 
and a first and second choice of showtimes. Be sure 
to include a self-addressed, stamped envelope and 
your daytime telephone number. For additional 
information call (212) 769-5900. 

Robots in Space features Lucasfilm s R2D2 and 
C-3PO- and has been created especially for children 
ages 7 to 12 Together with a live host, these fa- 
mous space robots take children on a tour of the 
universe See how satellites and probes — the real 
space robots — help us leam about worlds near 
and far Journey from the earth to other planets and 
distant black holes. Sat , July 8. and Sat . Sept. 9. at 
1 145 am Admission for Participating and Higher 
Members is $5 for adults and $3 for children. I 
information, call (212) 769-5900. 

Laser Light Shows 

Journey into another dimension where laser • 
als and rock music combine to create a dazzling 
experience of sight and sound Shows are presented 



on Fridays and Saturdays at 7:00, d 

p.m For prices and show schedule telephone 
(212)769-5100. 



It's always a good idea to call before visit- 
ing the Planetarium, since prices, programs, 
and showtimes are subject to change without 
notice. For general Planetarium information, 
call (212) 769-5100. 



Celebrate Summer 
at the Garden Cafe. 



5? 



With our Special Offer 

/,,,.,, Spm ialit) Drink and Deuerti 

I I . . With I'll! > III ' "I 

One Xiluli Ei 



Out Frown 9pw ■•«'•«■• 

DrillL <<r I » • 

ihr Gardi " I ifi 







Sun 



Mon 



Tues 



Wed 



Thur Fri 



Sat 



July 1995 

American Museum of Natural History 



4 Independence Day. 
The Museum is open. 



67:00 p.m. The Fossil 
Trail Members 
evening program Kauf- 
mann Theater $6 (or 
Members, $9 for non- 
Members. Page 2. 





_^f 






■« *J7:00 p.m. Spell 
lOof the Tiger 
Members' evening pro- 
gram Kaufmann Theater 
$8 (or Members. $12 (or 
non-Members Page 2 



%/% 6:30 P- m - Jour 
MrWney to the Center 

of the Earth Members' 
guided Museum tour Free, 
but reservations are re- 
quired Page 2 

Flora Portrayed opens in 
Gallery 77 Page 4 



■f C 11=00 a.m.- 

1.3' 00 p.m. The 
Genius and Elegance o/ 
Gramercy Park Members' 
walking tour. $25, and 
open only to Participating 
and Higher Members 
Tickets required Page 5 



-f JT1=00 p.m. A 

MMjPlanel Walk 

h (fit Solar Sv.s 

i, mi / )i, I -mil 

Ptppercorn Fret bul 
Uons • squln d 



17 



-fl QNoon-2:30 p.m. 

I.O..1..I 4:00-6:30 
p.m. Brooklyn and the 
i f ( ights Members' walking 
tour Ticket: required 
Page 1 

7:30 p.m. Ijnnaean 
Society Leonhardt People 
Center Fn 



19 



OZ\ 8 30 a m -" 
4fc"s.l0 p.m. How 

Water Works. Members' 

day trip $50. and open 

only to Participating and 

Higher Members. Tickets 

required Page 5 



21 



AQ10:00a.m.- 

AAI:0O|>,-,i. 

Dinosaurs in Relief 
Members' fossil casting 
workshop. $50, and open 
only to Participating and 
Higher Members. Ti« 
required Page 2 



23 



24 



30 



31 



ftP7:30a,m,- 
X#37:30 p.m. Mem- 
bers' Day Trip too Pi 
syluanla Coal Mine $65, 
and open only to Partiu 
■ pating and High' 

Page 5 




AQ4:00 p.m. While 
Mtt^Days. White 
Nights. Guided Museum 
tour Free Page 6 



Sun 



Mon 



Tues 



Wed 



Thur Fri 



Sat 



• 



August 1995 



311:00 a.m.- 
2:00 p.m. Members' 
Tour of the Brooklyn 
Botanic Garden $25. and 
open only to Participating 
and Higher Members. 
Tickets required. Page 1 



54:00 p.m. While 
Days, White Nights 
Guided Museum tour 
Free. Page 6. 



710:30 a.m. -noon. 
Long In the Tooth. 
Summer workshop (or 
young Members $18, and 
open only to Participating 
and Higher Members 
Tickets required Page 2 



810:30 a.m.-noon. 
Frl//s and Bills, Horns 
and Plates Summer 
workshop (or young Mem- 
bers $18, and open only 
to Participating and Higher 
Members Tickets required 
Page 2 



910:30 a.m.-noon. 
But Before There 
Were Dinosaurs Summer 
workshop for young Mem- 
bers. $18, and open only 
to Participating and Higher 
Members Tickets required. 
Page 2. 



■*g\ 10:30 a.m.- 
J. U noon. What s the 
Point? Summer workshop 
for young Members $18, 
and open only to Partici- 
pating and Higher Mem- 
bers Tickets required 
Page 2 



U 10:30 a.m.- 
noon. Snakes 
Aliue! Summer workshop 
for young Members. $18, 
and open only to Partici- 
pating and Higher Mem- 
bers Tickets required. 
Page 2. 



12 






13 



14 






New Parking 
Policy 

'I July 1, parking will 
no longer be complimentary 
for people attending evening 
programs. For information 
about parking rates, call (212) 
769-5238 

The parking lot is open 
every day from 7:00 a.m. till 
11:30 p.m The parking lot 
has a capacity of 100 vehicles 
and is opened on a first -come. 
I ii si served basis 

ill the Membership Ofl 
at (212) 769-5606 for 
inlormation about alternative 
parking. 



"1 C4:0O-5:30 P m 
lOand 6:00-7:30 
p.m. Before and After 
1624: The Dutch In New 
York. Members' walking 
tour Tickets required. 
Pagel 

7:30 p.m. Lmnaean 
Society Leonhardt People 
Center Free 



16 



-|^8:30a.m.-5:00 
M. m p.m. The Jacques 
Marchais Museum of 
Tibetan Art and the 
Richmondtown Restora- 
tion Historical Village 
Members' day trip. $50, 
and open only to Participat- 
ing and Higher Members. 
Tickets required Page 1 



1 fi 6:30 pm - The 

M.^3Equator. Members' 

guided Museum tour Free, 
but reservations are re- 
quired. Page 2. 



19 



22 



4:00 and 6:00 
p.m. Foley 



Square An Urban Cen- 
ter Members' walking 
tour $20, and open only 
lo Participating and Highei 
Members Tickets required 
Page 3 



«*«>4:00 and 6:00 

Mvp,m, Northern 
Central Park An Altered 
Landscape Members 
walking tour $20. and 
open only to Participating 
and Higher Members 
Tickets required. Page 3 



O/fl ' °" and 6:00 
Mt^K p.m. In wood Hill 
Park Nature at Its Best 
Members' walking tour 
$20, and open only to 
Participating and Higher 
Members. Tickets required 
Page 3. 



29 



0|\ 1:00-4 :00 p.m. 

^9\J Clearwater Sail. 
Members' environmental 
excursion. $50. and open 
only to Participating and 
Higher Members Tickets 
required Po 



31 



Printed on recycled paper 









I , 



For Participating and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



Vol. 20, No. 8 SopU-mU'i i 




Tyrannosaurus rex amid construction last year 



Hrn Hlin V*<\\ Craig Chrovk ./Dunk I Innin CAMNII 



Renovating the Dinosaur Halls 



Friday, September 29 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$6 for Members, $9 for non-Members 



How do you take a T. rex apart and 
put it back together? Very, very care- 
fully! Phil Fraley of the Department of 
Vertebrate Paleontology will talk with 
Members about the awesome task of 
disassembling the dinosaur king and 
other exhibits and putting the ancient 
bones back together. 



It's been 100 years since the Mu- 
seum opened the first of its fossil halls 
The first hall devoted exclusively to 
dinosaurs opened in 1927, an addi- 
tional hall premiered in 1939, and 
both halls were updated and remod- 
eled during the 1950s. These halls 
have been among the most popular 



and famous of the institution's attrac- 
tions for generations, and in June of 
Ihis year the Museum unveiled the new 
dinosaur halls, which have been com- 
pletely reorganized, reinstalled, and 
spectacularly renovated. 

Fraley, who is a coordinator of 
mounting and specimen restoration. 



will use slides to illustrate the rebuild 
ing (or disarticulation) and remounting 
of the dinosaur specimens He'll dis- 
cuss how fittings were reproduced to 
maintain the integrity of the original 
mounts and how the new armature for 
7 rex was fabricated. Use the coupon 
on page 3 to register. 




Mead Festival 
1995 



Complaints of a Dutiful Daughter 
is among the features of the 1995 
Margaret Mead Film and Video Festi- 
val. The festival will take place Octo- 
ber 18-23; a complete schedule of 
films appears on pages 7-9. 




Lecture 
Series 



I Ins watercolor on vellum illu 
tion of a yellow lady slipper is on di 
play in the current Gallery 77 

in Orchids. The exhibition Is 
the focus of the lecture sen. ' )n hlds: 
A Botanical History. Description 
these lectures and others appear on 
pages 10-12. 



The Wolf: Real or Imagined? 

Thursday, October 12 

Children (ages 6 and older): 4:00 p.m. 

$6 for Members, $9 for non-Members 

Adults: 7:00 p.m. 

$9 for Members, $15 for non-Members 

Kaufmann Theater 




Meet a living representative 
oi North Amerii a s most 
i.i n inating predatory species 
ii .i Members' program that 
combiM'"-. fai i and fli tion. 



Wildlife biologist Patricia 
Tucker will offer a glimpse 
Into the secret lives of wolves, 
and documentary filmmaker 
Bruce Weide will tell stories of 



wolves from myth and foil 
lore. Then the real stars of the 
show will take center 
Koani. a 100-pound gray 
from Montana, and Indy, her 
dog companion. 

Koani was born in I ' *' ' 1 to 
captive parents at a private 
wolf refuge. She was raised 
and trained by Tucker and 
Weide as an ambassador wolf, 
an animal teacher that edu- 
cates the public about wolves 
As an ambassador wolf Koani 
represents Wild Sentry, a 
nonprofit organization that 
blends science and the hu- 
manities to entertain and in- 
form. Wild Sentry's programs 
emphasize the wolf as a sj 
bol of wildness and stress the 
inappropriateness of wolves 
as pets. Wild Sentry and 
Koani present about 150 
programs each year to over 
20,000 people. 

Koani and friends will ap- 
pear at two programs, a 4:00 
p.m. program for children 
and a 7:00 p.m. show for 
adults. The children's show is 
60 minutes long, and the 
adults' program is 90 min- 
utes. Use the September 
Members' programs coupon 
on page 3 to register. 



Ancestral 
Passions 

The Leakey Family 
and the Quest for 
Humankind's 
Beginnings 

Thursday, September 7 
7:00 p.m. 
Kaufmann Theater 
$5 for Members, 
$8 for non-Members 




Because their discoveries 
laid the foundations for much 
of what we know about hu- 
n i. H i origins, the Leakeys — 
Louis. Mary, and Richard — 
are renowned as the first fam- 
ily of anthropology Each of 
the family made key fossil 
discoveries, Louis, in par- 
lli ulai Laid the theoretii al 
groin kIwi irk for the science of 
paleoanthropology by arguing 
that human life did not origi- 
nate on the I uiasian conh 
nent tens of thousand 1 -, i if 
years ago but likely evolved in 
Alma millions of years ago 
Members can hear about 
this fascinating family and 
i hen work at a presentation 
by Virginia Morell. who h 
written the family's first full 
biography, \rn estral Pas- 
Stons (Simon and Schuster, 
1905) She'll discuss the 
Leakeys' many significant 
finds as they pushed back the 
scope of human ancestry and 



articulated our relationship to 
the other primates, especially 
early hominids Morell will talk 
about the jealousies between 
these three forceful figures as 
well as their rivalries with 
other scientists. She'll also 
describe how the Leakeys 
fostered the work of other 
researchers, including the 
pioneering studies of Louis s 
most famous protegees, Jane 
Goodall, Birute Galdikas, and 
Dian Fossey. 

A science writer whose 
work has appeared in Dis- 
cover. Science, The New 
York Times Magazine, and 
other publications, Morell has 
lived in Ethiopia and Kenya 
and joined the Leakeys on 
two of their expeditions to 
West Turkana. She'll sign 
copies of Ancestral Passions. 
which will be available for 
purchase after the program. 
Call (212) 769-5606 for ticket 
availability. 



Before 

Paleontology: 

A Natural 

History 

of the Griffin 

Thursday, October 26 
7:00 p.m. 
Kaufmann Theater 
$7 for Members, 
$10 for non-Members 







In the seventh century BC 
the ancient Greeks began to 
trade with the Scythian no- 
mads who prospected for 
gold in the vast deserts of 
( tentral Asia I he nomads 
regaled the Greeks with tales 
of griffins — fierce and agile 
four-legged predators with 
wicked beaks thai inhabited 
the remote wilderness of Far 
s thia. These monsters 
guarded gold, defended their 
hatchlings, and hunted in 
packs for large prey. The 
griffin became a favorite motif 
for wiii cis vase paini 
sculptors, and other artists of 
i lassical antiquity 

At the Members program 
Before Paleontology A Nat- 
urol History of the Griffin, 
folklorisl Ac Incline Mayoi will 
dis< uss thi possibility that the 
myth "i the griffin .nose from 
the earliest recorded attempts 

Imagine the appearance 



and habits of the dinosaur. 
Ancient descriptions and re- 
cent paleontological discover- 
ies suggest that stories of 
griffins were inspired by rich 
fossil remains of Protocer- 
atops and other beaked di- 
nosaurs found in Cretaceous 
sediments along the old cara- 
van routes. Remarkably, the 
ancient reconstruction'' of 
the griffin anticipated some of 
the most modem theories 
about dinosaur behavi. n 

Mayor is an expert on an- 
cient Greek and Roman leg- 
ends related to natural 
history, and she has written 
numerous articles that have 
appeared in Archaeology 
magazine. Journal of An 
can Folklore. Cryptozool- 

Journal of Folklore 
Research, and other publica- 
tions 

Use the coupon on page 3 
to register 



Members' Grandparents Day Workshop 

The Experimental Orchestra 

Sunday, September 17 
11:00 a.m., 1:00 and 2:30 p.m. 
$12 per child (grandparent is free), 
and open only to Participating and 
Higher Members, ages 5 and older 



Master trash-basher Mr. B. 
(alias John Bertles) will help 
Members celebrate Grandpar- 
ents Day at a workshop in 
which participants will make 
musical instruments from 
recycled junk. 

Participants will begin by 
sampling a variety of instru- 
ments that were handmade by 
Bertles, who will talk about 
how these instruments work. 
Then grandparents and chil- 



dren will work together to 
make African thumb pianos. 
They'll use wood, hairpins, 
and staples to fashion these 
pleasingly portable 
instruments and learn how to 
compose simple but fun musi- 
cal pieces to play on their new 
creations. 

Use the coupon on page 5 
to register, and please note 
that tickets are available only 
by mail. 



Dead Men Do Tell Tales 

Thursday, October 5 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$5 for Members, $8 for non-Members 



Forensic scientist William 
Maples has an unusual gift — 
from a single bone, he can 
reconstruct not only the pos- 
sessor's identity but also the 
manner of his or her death. 
Maples has solved many an- 
cient and modern mysteries 
surrounding the dead; some of 
his more famous cases include 
laying to rest claims that 
Zachary Taylor was murdered, 
incriminating the Bolshevik 
assassins of the Russian czar 
Nicholas II. and collecting 
evidence from the victims of a 
serial murderer who preyed 
on college students in 
Gainesville, Florida. 

Maples will talk with Mem- 
bers about the ways in which 
forensic anthropologists inter- 
pret what he calls the commu- 
nication of the dead. His 
postmortem examination 



considers the form of marks 
on bones, fractures, cuts, 
indicators of age and sex, and 
a vast array of other informa- 
tion. In an illustrated lecture, 
Maples will explain the role of 
the forensic anthropologic 
and discuss some of his more 
interesting and unusual cases, 
including the trauma analysis 
of the skeleton of Don Fran- 
cisco Pizarro, the conqueror 
of Peru, who was killed by 
sword-wielding assailants in 
1541. and the examination of 
Joseph Merrick (the Elephant 
Man). Medgar Evers, Con- 
gressman Mickey Leland, and 
others. 

Copies of Maples' book. 
Dead Men Do Tell Tales 
(Doubleday. 1994), will be 
available for purchase at the 
program. Use the coupon on 
page 3 to register. 




ISSN 0194-6110 

Vol. 20, No. 8 
September 1995 

Donna Bell — Editor 

Sheila Greenberg — Associate Director of Membership 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Peter Zelaya — Membership Coordinator 

Traci Buckner — Membership Associate 

Robert Jahn — Membership Associate 

Rotunda, a publication for Participating and Higher 
Members of the Amencan Museum of Natural History, is 
published monthly September through June, bimonthly July and 
August. Publication offices are at Natural History magazine. 
American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th 
Street. New York. NY 10024-5192. Telephone: (212) 769- 
5606 Subscriptions $50 a year for Participating Member 
$100 a year for Contributor Membership. 
© 1995 American Museum of Natural History Second-class 

iage paid at New York. NY Postmaster: Please send address 
changes to: Rotunda. Membership Office, American Mus 
Natural History. Centra) Park West at 79th Street New York, 
NY 10024-5192 



Printed by Waldon Pre- New York 



|4I 



Young Members' Build-and-Fly a Model Airplane Workshop 

pteranodon Squadron 



Thursday, September 14 
5:00-8:00 p.m. 
$20, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 
Ages 11-14 




Flying aces of the future 
can get together at the Mu- 
seum to build their own 
model airplanes and take 
them on a spin around the 
Hall of Ocean Life. 

Instructor Don Ross intro- 
duces kids to the imaginative 
fun of modeling with a 30- 
minute flying demonstration 
of models, followed by an 
hour of model building and 
test flights. For the final hour 
of the workshop, participants 
will form squads for a contest 
in which each pilot will try to 
make a perfect flight around 
the hall. 

Use the coupon on page 5 
to register, and please note 
that tickets are available only 
by mail. 



Whale of a Day! 



Saturday, September 23 

$18, and open only to Participating and Higher Members 

Ages 4 and older 



A wonderful day amid the 
whales is in store for Members 
this month, featuring a fast- 
paced, fun-filled program, a 
demonstration with slides and 
specimens, and a crafts work- 
shop. 

At 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 
p.m. Ozzie Tollefson will pre- 
sent Whales. Giants of the 
Ocean. The fun begins with a 
puppet show starring the 
sperm whale and the blue 
whale and introducing some 
new terms: flipper, flukes, 
baleen, and krill. The pup- 
pets explain all about whales' 
physiology, feeding, commu- 
nication, and their endan- 
gered status. 



Ozzie will use creative dra- 
matics to explore the history 
of whaling (nowadays, he 
explains, the practice of com- 
mercial whaling is 
condemned), and the show 
concludes with a giant-screen 
slide presentation that takes 
viewers to the New Bedford 
Whaling Museum, the Mystic 
Marinelife Aquarium, and 
Cape Cod for an afternoon of 
whale watching. 

Before and after showtimes 
for Whales, Giants of the 
Ocean, Members can learn 
fascinating facts about whales 
from Clare Fleming, a scien- 
tific assistant in the Depart- 
ment of Mammalogy, who 



will present a slide-lecture. 
She'll also display specimens 
from the Museum's collec- 
tions. In addition, participants 
can make a take -home sou- 
venir at a crafts program 
hosted by June Myles. The 
lecture and the workshop will 
take place at 10:30 a.m. and 
12:30 and 2:30 p.m. 

Use the coupon on page 5 
to register for Whale of a 
Day, and please note that 
tickets are available only by 
mail. Members wishing to 
attend only Whales. Giants 
of the Ocean can use the 
coupon at right; tickets are 
$6 for Members and $9 for 
non-Members. 



Art of the Diorama 




,„ this 1941 P^to from the Mus^msconecUon^ 

the background for the Alaskan ^° r «'3™ £° £, o/ he E^.bKion De- 
Mammals. On Tuesday. October '^'^/ a Z elo °ment and history of the 
partment will talk with Members about the aeve top 

Museums .imeless dioramas The prog ra mwdl £%£% J ich are 

,ne Kaufmann ^""^ «^^^ 9 %^o-^-.6.«. 



September Members' 
Programs Coupon 



Name-.. 



Address: 



City: 



State 



.Zip: 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: 



Total amount enclosed: ■ 

Please make check (if applicable) payable to the American 
Museum of Natural Flistory and mail with a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope to: Septemho Members' 
Programs. Membership Office, American Museum of 
Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street. New 
York, NY 10024 5192 Telephone reservations are not 
accepted. No refunds or exchanges. 

Unless otherwise indicated, no more than eight 
tickets may be ordered for a program. Participating 
Members are entitled to four tickets per program at 
the Members' price. Higher Members are entitled 
to six tickets, and Associate Members are entitled 
to one ticket. 

History of the NYC Water Supply 

Wednesday, September 13, 7:00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $6: 

Number of additional tickets at $9: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Harlem River through the Ages 

Wednesday, September 20. 7 00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $6: 

Number of additional tickets at $9: 

Total amount enclosed for program 

Whales, Giants of the Ocean 

Saturday, September 23. Please indicate a first and second 
choice. 

ll-.30a.rn. 1:30 p m 

Number of Members' tickets at $6: 

Number of additional tickets at $9: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Renovating the Dinosaur Halls 

Friday, September 29, 7:00 p.m 

Number of Members' tickets at $6: 

Number of additional tickets at $9: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Dead Men Do Tell Tales 

Thursday, October 5, 7 00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $5: 

Number of additional tickets at $8: 

Total amount enclosed for program: — 

The Wolf: Real or Imagined? Thursday, October 12 
Children's show: Number of Meml ieri Hckel at $6: — 

Number of additional tickets at $9: 

I »ial amount enclosed for program: — 
Adults' show: Number of Members tli kets al $9: — 

Number of additional tickets at $15: 

rotal i mount enclosed for program: — 

Art of the Diorama 

Tuesday, October 17. 7 00 [• 
Number of Members H< ki i 

Number of additional tickets at $9 

Total amount enclosed for program 

Before Paleontology: A Natural History of the Griffin 

Thursday, October 26. 7 00 p.m. 

Number of Membi ets at $7: 

Number of additional til kets al $10 

Total amounl enclosed for program: 

Ghost Stories. Friday, October 27. 

Children's show Number of M< — 
Number of additional lid 9 _ 
Total amon 

Adults' show: Number of Members' ti< 

Number of additional Uc kets al $ 1 2 
rotal u ml _ 

Mischief Night: Rocketahip X-M 

Monday. Octobei " 
iber of free Members' tick' 
more than 2. please): 

NOTE: Orders received less than ten days before 
show dates will be held for pick up at the door on 
the day of the program if tickets are still available. 
If an event is sold out, you will be advised in writing 
or by phone and your check will be returned. 




Set Aside a 

Nest Egg 

for 
Science 
and 
-_____, Conservation... 

Illustration ol an 

oviiaplor and nesl 
by artist Gary Staab 
lor the June 1995 
Issue ol Natural 
History Magazine 

And Provide for Your Own Retirement. 

Through a gifl to the American Museum of Natural History that provides lifetime 

in, promote preservation and extend understanding of the natural world 

., ,„ rations to come and, a1 the same time, provide for your own retirement 

With this type of gift, you can: 

• receive Income for life, for yourself and/or a loved one; 

• claim an immediate income tax deduction; 

• avoid capital gains tax when low-yield, highly appreciated stocks are sold 
to re-invesl lor higher income; 

• reduce the cost — through the combined benefits of an income stream and 
an immediate income tax deduction - of a gift important to the Museum's 

future 

i Ml m ore information, please call ton-free 1(800) 453-5734 or complete and 
return this confidential reply form to Jane C. Palmer, Director of Planned Giving, 
Office Ol I development, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West 
■ i 79th Street, New York, m 10024-5192. 



Please send me information on gifts that provide lifetime income: 

Name-: 

Vddress - 

I ^ _State: _Zip: 



Phone (home) 

( ommeni 



(offit < ) 



Yom reply is confidential ami implies no obligation 



9/95 



Members' Birthday Parties 
at the Museum 



-hi i lnlil i .in play pin the 

i. ul on the Stegosaurus make 
a "fos iil to take home and 
enjoy the happlesl i >l birth 
the u/i irid s bl 
; he 
in i . isaui i i all Mu- 

iii birthday i larties 1 1 >m- 
bines a tout ol the exhibit!' >n 
hall andcrafts 

at ti\ 
i )ii„-i theme parties foi 



Members between the ages 
ml 10 focus on fossil 
ni.imnviK Aim ,m mammals, 
oce in dwellers, and Native 
■ I- ans 
The group should be no 
fewet than L0 and no more 

20 The lee is & 100 plus 
$15 pet i hild and covers all 
materials and th< of 

a Museum party coordinal 
I'll.' coordinal. u will help you 



plan a party that suits your 
child and will handle 

everything from candles to 
part* All you need to 

do is bring the cake and help 
escort the guests The parties, 
which are two hours long, are 
available only to Members at 
the Contributor ($100) and 
higher levels 

For more information call 
(212)769-5542. 



rhcMvnb i hl| Office would like to thank th« following young Membt lebrated their birthdays here 

,,,,,,,!, i „. v\.ii. .I. inn W.ni Tong Alvin Edersheim I rlsUna de Zulueta, Arielle Dan*, and Sarah Karron 



Members' Guided Tours 



I it lion, folklore, and fact 
are interwoven in a fascinating 
series of Museum tout rhe 
following special tours will be 
conducted by Volunteer High- 
lights Tour guide Robert Cam 
panile Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register, and please 
note that tickets are limited to 
2 per request 

King of the Wild Frontier. 
Friday, September 15, 6:30 
p in Explore the life and times 
of an American folk hero — 



Davy Crockett. Strange and 
interesting folklore about the 
wildlife of Davy's times will 
also be related. (Sold out from 
previous lssu< 

Friday the 13th Tour 
Friday. October 13. 630 
p m Many superstitions have 

sen from attempts to ex- 
plain natural phenomena. 
What better night than Friday 
the 13th to seek the roots of 
supeistitions, and what better 
place than the Museum to find 



them? Don't forget your rab- 
bit's foot 1 

The Telltale Tour A Night 
of Edgar Allan Poe Friday, 
October 20. 600 p.m. Do 
you dare hear mysterious tales 
in the evening in our dimly lit 
halls 9 Do you dare to feel the 
wind suddenly chill you to the 
bone when there is no wind? 
Those who delight in sharing 
such tales can quench their 
thirst with a night of Edgar 
Allan Poe 



Seniors: 

September Is Your Month at 
the Museum 

Now is the time to take advantage of programs 

and discounts designed especially for you 

throughout the month of September 

Free Walking Tours 

Education Programs 

Discounted Admissions 

Ten percent off in Shops and Restaurants 

Group Tours 

For more information stop by any of the Museum's information 

desks or call (212) 769-5350. 

Valid ID is required. 



The Coelacanth Saga 

Wednesday, October 25 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$8 for Members, $10 for non-Members 



Join James W. Atz, curator 
emeritus in the Department of 
Ichthyology, to hear the story 
of the coelacanth, the most 
famous fish in the collections 
of the American Museum — 
the zoological discovery of the 
century and the darling of 
monster lovers. 

Caught in the Indian Ocean 
off South Africa in 1938. this 
five-foot-long, steel-blue snap- 
ping fish turned out to be a 
"living fossil' ' — a member of 
a group thought to have be- 
come extinct 70 million years 
ago 

For more than a decade 
scientists searched in vain 
until they finally caught an- 
other one — in the Comoro 
Islands between Madagascar 
and Mozambique Only about 
200 coelacanths have been 
caught since, and the Ameri- 
can Museum received the In si 



specimen in the New World. 
Atz will explain how one lucky 
circumstance after another led 
to the discovery of this re- 
markable creature and how 
the coelacanth became the 
center of an evolutionary con- 
troversy. 

To order tickets send your 
check payable to Friends of 
Fishes, AMNH, and a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope 
to: Coelacanth Saga, Depart 
ment of Ichthyology, Ameri- 
can Museum of Natural 
History, Central Park West at 
79th Street, New York, NY 
10024-5192. Be sure to in- 
clude a separate sheet of 
paper on which you've indi- 
cated your name, address, 
daytime telephone number, 
number of tickets, and 
amount of the check. Call 
(212) 289-3605 for additional 

information. 



Dino-Mite 
Senior Deal! 

September is Senior Citizen month! 

25% Off Food 

to all Senior Citizens throughout the month. 

Iloinx: Lunch, Won.- Fn: 11:30 - 3:30 

Saturday n nil Sunday Brunch: 11:00- 1:00 
Dinner seating, /■>(.- Sal: 5:00 - 7:30 
For Reservations call 212 -H7 13436 

gg fr 2.7/ Discount Off Food ^£ft 
^•^ for Senior Citizens ^kmW 

Coupon cannot be combined with any other offer. 
\i ailable in Garden Cafe only. 

I ./irr« Seplrmbrr 30. !'>'''• 




Ghost Stories 

Friday, October 27 

Kaufmann Theater 

Children (ages 5-12): 6:00 p.m. 

$6 for Members, $9 for non-Members 

Adults: 8:00 p.m. 

$8 for Members, $12 for non-Members 



Storyteller Laura Simms 
will usher in the Halloween 
season with ghost and spirit 
talcs from the visible and 



invisible worlds. Members of 
all ages will be enchanted by 
the traditional stories — full 
of classic wisdom, eerie sym- 




bolism, and humor — that 
Simms makes relevant to 
modem culture. She'll also 
tell of true-life adventures that 
reveal the magic and mystery 
of daily existence. 

At the children's program, 
listeners will hear of 
marvelous monsters, talking 
ghosts, and the story of the 
opening of a forbidden door. 
Simms will also offer special 
instructions on what to do if 
you wake up and discover 
that you have been turned 
into a witch. Adults will hear 
a true tale within a ghost tale, 
a modern myth of a journey 
to the land of the dead, and 
an extraordinary tale from 
Nepal. 

This year marks the four- 
teenth anniversary of Simms' 
Halloween shows at the 
Museum A leader in the re- 
vival of storytelling as an 
art form. Simms has traveled 
across three continents to 
hear and tell the world's 
stories, and her teachers have 
included Margaret Mead and 
Joseph Campbell. 

Use the coupon on page 3 
to register. 



Members' Walking Tour 

Bridging the Harlem River by Foot 

Saturday, September 30 

10:00 a.m. and noon 

$20, and open only to Participating and Higher Members 

Ages 16 and older 



There is no better way to 
learn about the Harlem River 
than to walk along its banks 
and cross some of its bridges. 
Join Sidney Horenstein, the 
Museum's coordinator of 



environmental public pro- 
grams, as he leads a walk 
through the areas of Spuyten 
Duyvil, Marble Hill, Kings- 
bridge, and Inwood. He'll 
discuss the river's history and 



point out items of geologic 
interest. 

Use the coupon on this 
page to register for the tour, 
and please note that tickets 
are available only by mail. 



The Geology and History 

of the Harlem River through the Ages 

Wednesday, September 20 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$6 for Members, $9 for non-Members 



Most of us think of the 
Harlem River as a waterway 
spanned by many bridges — 
which it is. But it's much 
more than that. The Harlem 
River has a colorful history 
that includes an altered 
course and a filled and 



straightened shoreline. 

Sidney Horenstein, the 
Museum's coordinator of 
environmental public 
programs, will use slides to 
illustrate his lecture. Horen- 
stein will discuss the river's 
geologic origins, its first 



bridges, and the development 
of numerous marinas. He'll 
also describe the effects of 
industrialization, including the 
river's railroad history and its 
current condition. 

Use the coupon on page 3 
to register. 



History of the New York City Water Supply 



Wednesday, September 13 

7:00 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$6 for Members, $9 for non-Members 



^ The state of New York 
City's water supply is a con- 
troversial issue these days 
Sidney Horenstein. the Mu- 
seum's coordinator of envi- 
ronmental public programs, 
will talk about how the system 
arrived at its present condi- 
tion. 
This slide-lecture will ex- 



plore the quest for water, 
starting with the area's earliest 
residents on the southern tip 
of Manhattan Island and cul- 
minating in the far-flung sys- 
tem that reaches 120 miles 
north of the city. The largest 
municipal water supply system 
in the United States. New 
York City's system boasts 



many innovations and delivers 
the best water in the country. 
Horenstein will discuss how 
the delivery system was ( I 
ated and built, related political 
intrigues, and current health 
issues. 

Use the September Mem 
bers' programs coupon on 
page 3 to register. 



Members' Mischief Night Private Screening 

Mystery Science Theater 3000: 
Rocketship X-M 

Monday, October 30 
5:00-7:00 p.m. 
Kaufmann Theater 
Free, and open only to 
Participating and Higher Members 



Science Fiction Film Series - III 

presents 




The TV wiseguys of Mys- 
tery Science Theater 3000 
are coming to the Museum 
for Mischief Night with a 
screening of the 1950 film 
Rocketship X-M. 

The sui a of the science 
fiction movie Destination 
Moon spawned a wav 
imitations, among them 
Rocketship X-M The plot of 
this gem concerns an expedi- 
tion to the moon that goes 
horribly wrong — an em u il I 
the fuel mixture shoots the 
crew to Mars, where radioac- 
tive survivors of a ruined civi- 
lization throw rocks at the 



astronauts and the film sud 
denly turns purple f?o< (eel 
ship X M Is / / mlnul 
and stars Lloyd Bridgi <md 
Hugh I ''Brian 

The My--; nee Th< 

atei cast will offei 
commentary during the 
movie. Brian Sullivan, produi 
tlon designer al the I layden 
Planetarium, will Intr 
thi film and (alk about ll 
special effe< I 

I !■ . | ifcmU'i Mem 

bers' programs coupon on 
page 1 1 rand pli 

note thai tii kel ■ -ire limited to 
2 per requesl 



Tours, Day Trips, and Workshops. Use this coupon to 
register for Pteranodon Squadron, The Experimental < h 
chestra, Whale of a Day!, and Bridging the I larlem River 
by Foot. This coupon can also be used to order tickets for 
the free tours Friday the 13th and The Telltale Tour; please 
note that only two tickets per tour are available for eai 1 1 



Name(s) of program(s): 



Number of rickets and price (please indicate which program 
if more than one):__ . 



Total amount enclosed:. 



Name: 



Add r 



City: 



.State: 



-Zip: 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: _ 

Please make check payable to the American Museum of 
Natural History and mail with a self-addressed, stamped 
envelope to: Tours and Workshops, Membership Office 
American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 
79th Street, New York, NY 10024 5192. 



W 







CRUISES 
Arabian Gulf Voyage 

Ihuanhvi '< 19. /W 

l-ivc thousand eai ol human 
history make (his one of the mosl 
i. is, inating places in me world 
\ | ii Kuwail Bahrain Saudi Ara- 
bia, Qatai i nited Vrab l mirates 
and ( 'man. From $6,950 

I lolidays ill the Caribbean 

Decembei 1995 , 



( oral reefs, volcani( islands, exotic 
wildlife .ind diverse cultures as we 

exploit Barbados. < iicnada. I" 

bago I arriai ou Si V im enl ind 
si Lucia, using e o< ■ tall ship as 
urn base From $ ! 

GalapagOS Islands & Quito 
January 12 24, 1996 and 
February 9 11, 1996 



Land tortoises, marine and land 
iguanas sea lions and a magnifi 
1 1 ,,i arraj oi birdlife • ontinue to 
make these extraordinarj volcank 

islands .i paradise, horn sj.'Mdi 

Antarctica 

fanuan 13 Feb I I" 1 '!' 



A joumej i" the toitan tic Penin- 
sula .in ii j realm ol massive 
i, , u rgs mountains and i< e floes 
unii seals, whalt s and p< nguins 
Also visit South I ieorgia, South 
, irkneyi and Falklands. From 

< Caribbean <>n the Sea Cloud 

r, hi mm- < Id. iwr> 

Tropical Flora and fauna -it^\ vol- 
i anii landscapes charai terize the 
lovelj islands ol \ntigua I arri- 
ai ou, I obago si l ucia I tominica 
and Isles des Saintes aboard the tall 
ship Seat loud From $3,990 

Papua New Guinea 
February 14 - March 12. 1996 



A journey to this isolated country 
foi a voyage along the Sepik Rivei 
and among the islands of the 
Solomon Sea, areas ol -run 
i - exotic wildlife, rain forests, 

lush islands and di\cisc CUltU 

i i, mm $ 990 from I os Vngeles 
Baja & the Great Whales 

I clonary 29- March 1 '. /'W> 

A cause during the winter months, 
when ( alifornia graj whales mi 
grate to Baja ( alifornia to breed in 
the ric h waters whi re sea birds and 
othei wildlifi i ongregatc I rom 
990 

Islands of the Indian Ocean 

Muiih 11-2" /'"*» 

From the legendai y island ol 
ibar, we < raise to Ihe islands ol the 
i omoros Madagas< ai and the 
Sey< bell< • whi n a remarkabli 
arraj ol rare and uniqui 
live From$6,500 



American 
Museum of 
Natural 
i ■*£•'■* History 

Discovery Tours 

Central Park West at 79th Street 

New York, NY 10024-5192 

Toll-tree (800) 462-8687 

(212)769-5700 




\ ] AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY [ 7 
: / \l Exploring the world with expert lecturers 




DISCOVERY TOURS 



the American 

Museum of Natural History hasspi 
thousands ol expeditions around the globe in an 
effort to understand the world around us. I Ins 
tradition ol exploration inspires Di 
[burs, the international and domestic stud) tour 
;ned to enhance your appreciation 
and understanding ol the natural world. 

i rom the am ienl i ivilizations ol Asia to the 
glorious African savannah, our programs offer 



a wonderful '1 destinations to choo 

from Rrsl study tout in 1953, w 

taken over 8,000 travelers to the world's 

mosi remote regions in thecompan) of 
distinguished - ientists and educators. For 126 

MNH has been exploring remote 
corners of the world For ovei 40 years we have 
been im iting members and friends to share 
unique adventures with Museum scientists. loin 
us tins year on an adventure of discove 



Patagonia to Peru 

March IV ■ April 4. /Wo 

A voyage from Puerto Mtontt, 
i hile i" Salaverry, Peru an 
exquisite coastline ol foothills, 
,i, sen volt anoes, lush valleys, 
colonial towns wildlife sanctuai 
ii national parks and archeologi- 
i al sites, From $6,470 

Costa Rica and Panama 

Manh 19-26. 1996 

Few places on earth can rival the 

resplendent beauty and rich biolog- 
i< al diversitj of Costa Rica and 
Panama We visit wildlife reserves 
and also transit the legendai \ 
Panama Canal From $2,390 

Amazon Expedition 

\,.nl II 21. /Wfi 

We sail upstream from Manaus to 
the Peruviani itj ol Iquitos, where 

Ihe Amazon narrows and ihe ram 
forest, Tilled with birds, reptiles and 
mammals, encroaches on the river. 
From $3,950 from Miami 

British Isles and Ireland 

June 7-21. 1996 

I he waters of Britain and Ireland 

are speckled with lush green is- 
lands We W Ml explore the rugged 
outlying islands and follow the 
verdant coastline tO historic cities. 

i rom $4,295 

The Turkish Coast 

June IS- July I. /Wo 

Ancient cities dot the rugged south- 
ern coast of Turkey. We explore a 
region ski ped in ihe history ol 
Alexander, the Greeks. Romans. 
Byzantines and others From 
$4,895 

Alaska's Coastal Wilderness 

June 23- M /W6 

A voyage among the pristine is- 
lands and "ink ate coastline oi 
Alaska's magical Inside Pass 

icnowned loi Hs massive glaciers 

rjords, dense fan sts mountains 
v. hal< s, sea hons. bears and birds 
i rom approx s\ k '00 

Bridging the Bering Strait 

July 14-30. 1996 

A remote and untamed i ornei ol 

iIk woild the I i aiul ihe 

islands scattered throughout il an a 
paradise foi us to sean h foi 

whales, t in seals and nnlhons ol 

lirds i rom $4,745 
Northwest Passage 

JuI\20-Aukum \ /wo 

\n expedition along the legendary 
ice pat k< d sea route through 
I in. 1. 1. 1 v pristine northern « 



where polar bears, whales, sea 
birds and historic sues associated 
v, nil exploration abound. $ TBA 

Expedition to Irian Jaya 
Se^tembei 28 -October l\ 1996 
An exploration of the cultures and 
natural history of the lush, moun- 
tainous Asmat area and the Banda 

of Irian Jaya. New Guinea 
western half. $TBA 

Ancient Egypt and the Nile 

October 14-30. 1996 

We explore the extraordinary sites 
along the Nile River, including the 

pyramids. Saqqara, Dendera, 

Luxor, Kamak. die Valley of the 
Kings. Abu Sunhel and more. 
From approx. $5,300 from N.Y. 

TRAIN JOURNEYS 

Copper Canyon 

March 2-10. 1996 

A journey by train from Chihua- 
hua to the Pacific, stopping at 
several places including Mexico's 
breathtaking Copper Canyon. Ap- 
prox. $2,300 

Beijing to Moscow 

June 13-28. /Wft 

The Trans-Siberian, one of the 
greatest railways in the world, 
takes us from Beijing, through the 
Gobi, the Mongolian steppe, the 
Siberian taiga and along Lake 
Baikal to Moscow. From $7,490 

Rocky Mountain Parks 

Mas 1 1 -I". IW6 

A journey in the tradition of the 
greai rail trips of die past focusing 
on western national parks, includ- 
ing Rocky Mountain, Bryce. Zion, 
Petrified Forest and the Grand 
Canyon. $ TBA 

Southern Africa 

September I '996 

I ins program takes us 1,500 miles 
from Vi< toria I alls to ( ape i ov> n, 
South Africa, stopping en rouu al 
Zambezi, Matapos and Krugei 
National Parks, historic towns and 

more SKI lio from New York 

LAND TRIPS 
Guatemala and the Maya 

Januai\ 1 1-2S. /9M6 

The Maya, the greatest of the an- 
cient Mesoamei ican c h ilizations, 
are the focus ol this itinerary . with 
\ isits also to local markets and 
villages. Approx. $3,000 



Senegal and Mali 
fanuan 24 - Feb. 7, 1996 



A survey of West African cultures 
including the Wolof traders and 
fishermen of Senegal, die Tuaregs 
of the southern Sahara and the 
cliff-dwelling Dogons of Mali. 
$7,995 from New York 



Costa Rica 

Februa.y3-I5. 1996 

An exploration of Costa Rica's 
national parks, focusing on Palo 
Verde. Carara, Monteverde, Poas 
Volcano. La Selva and Tortugue- 
ro. Approx. $3,775 from Miami 

India 

February 8-27. 1996 

Ornate temples, fortresses, camels, 
elephants, ancient beliefs and col- 
orful traditions highlight our jour- 
ney to Bombay, Agra. Varanasi, 
Udaipur. Palitana, Somnath. Sasan- 
gir and Ahmedabad. $ TBA 

Tanzania Migration 

January 13-28. 1996 

Tanzania's vast plains play host to 
timeless scenes. We will explore 
parks in Tanzania including 
Selous. Ruaha, Ngorongoro Crater 
and Serengeti. Approx. $6,500 

Hawaii 

March 1996 

Visiting Maui and the Big Island, 
participants will enjoy volcanic 
scenery, bamboo forests, hidden 
valleys, whale watching, canoeing 
and snorkeling, while studying the 
ancient culture of Hawaii. $ TBA 

Ancient Kingdoms of the Ori- 
ent: Burma and Thailand 

February 3-15. 1996 

We will enjoy the beauty of the 
region's glorious heritage and 
explore Bangkok, the remnants of 
Sukhothai and Ayutthaya. Mand- 
alay, Sagaing and magnificeni 
Pagan by boat. $ TBA 

Venezuela 

March 21 -April 3. 1996 

A program focusing on the national 
parks of Venezuela and its remark- 
able natural features as we explore 
I [em i Pittiei National Park, El Frio 
Biological Station, the Andes and 
Angel Falls. $TBA 

Jordan and Israel 

\pnl /Wo 



Indonesia 

April 14 - May I. 1996 

An intimate look at the arts, his- 
tory, religion and cultural heritage 
of Sumatra. Java, and Bali, includ- 
ing Lake Toba, an orangutan re- 
search center, Prambanan and 
Borobudur. Approx. $3,950 

Origins of Man in South 
Africa and Botswana 

Mas 1996 

A survey of famous fossil sites and 
wildlife areas such as Lapa -lala. 
Mashatu, Mthetho-musha and the 
Okavango Delta. $ TBA 

Cornwall Walk 

June 1996 

Through daily walks and visits 
with local experts, participants 
explore spectacular rocky seaside 
cliffs, tropical gardens, anil p.isioral 
landscapes. $TBA 

Native America by DC3 

June 6-17. 1996 

This unusual program gives us an 
opportunity to visit with Native 
Americans on four reservations in 
Minnesota, South Dakota and 
Montana. $TBA 

Galapagos and Ecuador 

July 2-12. 1996 

Specially designed forTamilies. 
this program begins in the Ande.in 
highlands of Ecuador and ends 
with a 7-day cruise among the 
Galapagos Islands. $ TBA 

French and Spanish Cave Art 

September 1996 

The Paleolithic works of art found 
in the caves of northern Spain .ind 
southern France, including the 
original Lascaux and Altamira. are 
our focus. $ TBA 



An in-depth survey of die extraor- 
dinarj archeological sites and 
ancient Cities Ol Israel and Jordan. 

including ( apemaum Petraand 

much more. $ TBA 






MORE INFORMATION? 



II you are interested in 

receiving the specific 
itineraries, costs and gen 
information for any of the 

d here, please indici 

which ones you want and 
this coupon to the Disco 
lours office. 

Please send a copy of; 

1 General Brochure (a li 
i all trips, costs and highlights) 

| "I Specific Brochures (di 
I itineraries, cost, etc t tor the 
i follow nig trips 



Send brochures to 



i 

i 

i 

1 

i 












i American Mu 

i 

i sn 1002 



1995 Margaret Mead Film 
and Video Festival 

Wednesday, October 18-Monday, October 23 
Wednesday, Thursday, Monday: 6:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m. 
Friday: 6:15-8:30 p.m. 
Saturday: 11:00 a.m.-8:45 p.m. 
Sunday: 11:00 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 

For further information call (212) 769-5305 




Harold will be shown on October 18 in the Auditorium at 6:30 p.m. 
(Harold Blair is third from the right) 



Ticket Information 

Full -u. $40 for Members and students 

with ID. $44 for non-Members I Ise the coupon on 
page 9 to order tick il 



Become a Friend of the Festival for $125 

Friends receive a festival pass walid for admission 
to .ill screenings; a festival T-shirt an invitation for 
two to opening night < (X ktails reserved seating Foi 
the first screening of each day or evening (if contri 
button is received by October 16); and recognition In 
the 1996 festival guide 

Full-week and Friend of Festival passes will be sold 
on the evenings ol Wednesday, October 18. and 
rhursday, October 19. at the 77th Street entrant i 

Daily ticket $7 for Members and students with ID. 
$8 for non-Meml> 

Tickets may be purchased on day oi Rims -ifter 
5:00 p.m. on we md after 10:30 a.m. on 

weekends. 

Festival pass, daily H< kel and I riend ol 1 1 stl 
pass can be prepurchus. ,1 with MasterCard or VISA 
Fortickel charges call (212) 769-5305. 

All seating is on a fil si 1 1 ime firsl served b 
Passes and daily tickets do not guarantee a seal to 
the theater or film < >l y »ui choice. Programs subject 
to change. 

Symposium Information 

The Margaret Mead Film and Vlde< 1 1 estii al and 
New York University's Program in Culture and 
Media and Center for Media, * Culture and I listory. 
Departm. in ol Anthropology, will present screen- 
ings and discussions. All si Ions will be held on 
Thursday and Friday at the Museum I hursda; 
theme is Body Polltlt s Representing I Usability; 
Friday'sis I he Social Ben I r Film Collectives and 
Alternative Media. Seating is limited. Foi a com 
plete symposium s< hedul. i all (212) 998-85. r >n 

T-Shirts 

Mead Festival T-Shui I estival logo with purple i n 

freencolm I arge size only. $11.50 for Memb 
I I lor non-Members I Ise the coupon on pagi 9 

to oil Km I shirl 



) i 









Wednesday, 
October 18 



AUDITORIUM 

6:30 p.m. Harold. The 
intriguing story of Australian 
opera star Harold Blair, who 
has been called the "aborigi- 
nal Paul Robeson." Blair's life 
is chronicled from his birth on 
a Queensland Reserve in 
1924 to his classical training 
in the Harlem of the 1950s, 
where he experienced a politi- 
cal awakening (Repeat: Sun- 
day, Linder). 

8:05 p.m. The State of 
Weightlessness. A rare be- 
hind-the-scenes look at the 
Soviet/Russian space pro- 
gram combines interviews 
with cosmonauts and archival 
footage. 

9-20 p.m. The Vegetable 
Mob. A delightful portrait of 
the filmmaker's relatives, first- 
generation Sicilian immigrants 
to suburban Australia. They 
carry on the tradition of their 
rural forefathers —the playful 
yet serious cultivation of a 
superior tomato. (Repeat: 
Monday. Auditorium) 

' hOcalo a fen den by or m ctAtbonbcn with 
*" *"tfucpalog|rt. 



9:30 p.m. A Forgotten Peo- 
ple: The Sakhalin Koreans.* 
The little-known saga of the 
Koreans of Sakhalin Island, a 
territory north of Japan off 
the Siberian coast. Banished 
to the island by the Japanese 
during the war and forced to 
become conscripted laborers, 
the Koreans were later de- 
serted by them and suffer 
discrimination under Soviet 
rule. 

KAUFMANN 

8:00 p.m. Gene Hunters* 
The Human Genome Project 
involves the collection of ge- 
netic material from isolated 
populations around the world 
to safeguard against genetic 
extinction. Some people be- 
lieve the project represents an 
attempt to achieve human 
advancement; others decry it 
as a vestige of colonialism 
Geneticists, ethicists. and 
indigenous activists from both 
sides are featured. (Repeat: 
Sunday. Kaufmann) 

910 p.m. Voices of Or 
chid Island. On a remote 
island almost 50 miles from 
Taiwan, the Yami confront 
tourism and a nuclear waste 
site imposed by Taiwanese 
officials. The islanders have 
adapted to some changes and 
have resisted others (Repeat: 
Saturday. Linder) 



LINDER 

8:00 p.m. The Uprising of 
'34. In 1934 millworkers in 
the southern United States 
organized forces of nearly half 
a million to protest inhumane 
working conditions. More 
than 50 years later parti. I 
pants and their descendants 
tell of the strike, which culmi- 
nated in violence, bloodshed, 
and murder. 



9:50 p.m. Follow-up After 
61 Years of Silence: Honea 
Path Rememl 

PEOPLE 
CENTER 

Film Collective: 
Ateliers Varan 

8:00 p.m My Vote is My 
Secret: South-African Chron- 



icles 1 994 *The 1990s wit 
■Hi 1 1 Africa, 
wiih lull p.nticipation by com 
munities and town hips iii the 

( ji •. process. Three film 

makers document the da; 
leading to the first demo< rati( 
elections In live different black 

nships. 

in LOp.m Stolal ' Papua 
New ( mill. m film students look 
al I'-tirees in France. 




Gene HunteTS. 8:00 p.m., Kaufmann 



Thursday, 
October 19 

AUDITORIUM 

6:30 p.m. Harlem Diary* 
Nine young women and men 
weave a tale of hope and 
resilience in America's most 
famous African-American 
community. 

8:20 p. m. Their Own Viet- 
nam.* Five women veterans 
of the Vietnam war describe 
their experiences, whi< h 
are in contrast to the official 

Army de| in I s ol Vietnam 

M exciting and fun 
career opportunity for 
I, male offii < 

9:10 p.m. Hunting for 
Wolves. A former prisoner, 

who is now a boss of Siberian 
gold hunters, takes a 
journey with a friend, one of 
Russia's most powerful busi- 
nessmen. The poetry and 
prophetic words of musician 
Vladimir ViSSOtsky serve 
the backdrop. 



KAUFMANN 

Religion Today 

6:30 p.m. Holy Madness. 
"Jerusalem Fever'' is the 
bizarre phenomenon whereby 
visitors to the sacred city are 
overcome by religious zeal 
and can experience mental 
aberrations thai lead to hospi- 
talization or imprisonment 
Repre entatives of Christian, 

■ill and Muslim groups 
discuss the phenomenon with 
mrmlx'rs ol the l< mrist police. 

(Repr.ii Sund ij I inder) 

7:45 p.m. Mundo Mila- 
grOSO (Miraculous World).* 



Apparitions of Mary and Jesus 
have been sighted in a tortilla, 
a tree, and a Chevy Camaro, 
and these items are shrines 
that attract thousands of pil- 
grims to the Rio Grande Valley 

outhem Texas This film 
examines the impact of these 
apparitions on the Mexican- 
American community. (Repeat: 
Saturday. Under) 

8:30 p.m. The Trials of 
Telo Rinpoche. A young 
P] nladelphian whose parents 
are Kalmykian refugees is rec- 
ognized as a reincarnate lama 
and sent to a South Indian 
monastery to become a Tibetan 
Buddhist monk. There the 
young man is faced with the 
challenge of rebuilding Bud- 
dhism in a newly independent 
republic and grapples with the 
temptation to return to Philly 
and his twenty-something 
friends. (Repeat: Sunday, Under) 

9:45 p.m. La Promesa* A 
church/leprosarium on the 
i i it skirts of Havana became a 
stage for a struggle between 
religious and political freedom 
in 1993. 



UNDER 

Outsiders/Insiders 

6:30 p.m. Struggle and 
Success. Many African-Ameri- 
can professionals living in 
Japan have experienced psy- 
i hit freedom in a country that 
places all outsiders in a single 
category: gaijin (foreigners). 

7:45 p.m. Something 
Strong Within* This video 
brings together footage shot 
by several Japanese-American 
Internees in US concentration 
, .mips during WWII. The film 
depicts their struggle to over- 
come betrayal and hardship 



and reconstruct a community 
behind barbed wire. 

8:40 p.m. Struggle and 
Success. (Repeat) 

9:50 p.m. Something 
Strong Within. (Repeat) 



PEOPLE 
CENTER 

Film Collective: 
Amber Films 

6:30 p.m. The Box. This 
animated short expresses the 
fear, isolation, and alienation 
of the urban sprawl as seen 
through the eyes of an elderly 
woman. 

6:50 p.m. Byker. The 
working-class town of Byker 
in northeastern England was 
transformed by urban develop- 
ment from the 1960s through 
the 1980s. This film, which 
was shot over a 12-year pe- 
riod, combines photos, inter- 
views, and dramatic sequences 
to evoke the community's 
responses to the changes. 

7:40 p.m. Seacoal. People 
in the industrial landscape of 
Lynemouth, England, make 
a living from collecting waste 
coal that washes ashore. For 
two years the production team 
lived intermittently among 
the seacoalers, and their ex- 
perimental work fuses docu- 
mentary, improvisation, and 
drama. 

9:20 p.m. Letters to Katja. 
A member of the Amber 
Collective returns with her 
adult daughter to her 
birthplace in Finland. Diary 
entries, home movies, 
and contemporary footage 
reveal her relationship with 
the country she left behind. 



Saturday, 
October 21 

KAUFMANN 

1 i 00 a.m Bedhaya: Sa- 
cred Darn es * Retired 
.Lull cis ol the sultan's sacr< d 
ipe reflect on changes in 
the court. 

11:35 a.m. God Gave Her 
a Mercedes- Bern* 
(See Friday. Kaufmann) 

L2:40p.m Handsof 
History. Four aboriginal 
women artists from differenl 
nations — Salish, Gill 
Blood, and Chippewa — 

ae new forms while paying 
tribute to then traditional cul- 
ture 

2:00 p.m Iraqi Worn, n 
Voices from Exile Iraqi 
women — a doctor, teach, u 
ai iress, and students — living 
u i . xile in England discuss the 

ectsof Saddam Hussein's 
regime on their to 
| in p.m llu Last 

I 'olonlals An assortment 
of expatriate^ remain In Zaire, 
despite its fragile economv 
i erne violence, and pi >] 
uncertaii 

4:40 |i iii When Billy 
Brokr I lis I lead. . . and 

Vales of Wonder Billj 
Goldiv ,ni award-winning 

radio journalist suffered brain 

damage in a motor scooter 



accident 10 years ago. In this 
irreverent road movie he 
iiu.vts people with disabilities 
and observes their strengths 
and anger in efforts to forge 
a new civil rights movement. 

6:00 p.m. Twitch and 
Shout. Tourette's Syndrome 
(TS) is a genetic disorder that 

involuntary yelling, 
obscene vocalizations, and 
compulsive behavior. Photo- 
joumalist Lowell Handler, who 
has TS, uses humor and in- 
sight to introduce others with 
TS and how they negotiate a 
misunderstanding world 

7:20 p.m. Complaints of 
a Dutiful Daughter. This 
intimate portrait of the film- 
maker's mother, who is af- 
flicted with Alzheimer's, 
approaches the difficulties of 
m.'inory loss with humor and 
sensitivity. The filmmakei 
reveals hei relationship with 
Ini mother, the mother's 
.ittitude toward her daugh 
homosexuality, and how they 
i terms with their 
memories and the future. 



UNDER 

11:00 am. My Life as I 
Live 1 1 The sequel to My 
Swri'M'ul cis an Aboriginal. 
a 1978 film by Aborky 
Australian activist and countrv- 
er Essie Coffey. 




Coffey, who is popularly 
known as Bush Queen, por- 
trays the aboriginal commu- 
nity's fight for 
self-determination. 

12:05 p.m. Ghurbal* A 
master craftsman in rural 
Egypt weaves animal skins 
to create a ghurbal that is 
used to "winnow" new life 
in sebou' ceremonies. 

12:50 p.m. Pottery of 
San Marcos. (Spanish only) 
Women potters from Mexico 
eam extra money by creating 
beautiful pots. 

1:20 p.m. Tepu* A Huichol 
shaman journeys with the 
lilmmaker to Mexico City and 
comments on the future. 

2:00 p.m. remnants. 
(See Friday, Linder) 

2:25 p.m. Voices of 
Orchid Island. (See Wednes- 
day, Kaufmann) 

4:10 p.m. The Morehouse 
Men. Clandestine initiation 
ceremonies and a religious 
controversy are exposed in 
i his chronicle of a year in the 
life of students at an elite all- 
black men s college in Atlanta. 

(Repeat Sunday, Kaufmann) 

5:30 p.m. Mundo Mi/n- 
groso. (See Thursday. Kauf- 
mann) 

p.m. Repeat: Tepu 

715 p.m. Sugar Slaves. 
(See Friday, Under) 



Holy Madness, 6:30 p.m., Kaufmann 



Friday, 
October 20 

KAUFMANN 

6:15 p.m. God Gave Her a 
Mercedes-Benz.* In Lome, 
the market capital of Toto, 
women eam money and re- 
spect through their control of 
trade. One of them, Mama 
Benz, sells whimsical African 
textiles and drives the car after 
which she is named. 
(Repeat: Saturday, Kaufmann) 

7:20 p.m. Femmes aux 
Yeux Ouverts. African 
women are organized at the 
grassroots level to oppose 
female genital mutilation, 
educate each other about 
sexually transmitted diseases, 
and run successful businesses. 
The Togolese filmmaker 
shows the connections between 
Africa's development and the 



progress of its women. 

LINDER 

6:15 p.m. remnants. A 
short experimental film expos- 
ing the manipulated, 
fragmented reality of Japanese 
society and the representation 
of Japanese people in the 
American media. (Repeat: 
Saturday, Under) 

6:40 p.m. Sugar Slaves. 
The Australian sugar cane 
industry was based on the 
labor of Pacific Islanders en- 
ticed or kidnapped into slavery 
This film profiles Pacific Is- 
landers trying to reunite with 
their families. (Repeat: Satur- 
day, Linder) 

7:50 p.m. Pepper's Pow- 
Wow. Kaw/Creek Indian Jim 
Pepper pioneers the fusion of 
contemporary jazz and Native 
American traditional music. 
(Repeat: Sunday, Linder) 



Sunday, 
October 22 



KAUFMANN 



11:00 a.m. Dealers 
among Dealers. New York 
City's 47th Street is home to 
the nation's multimillion- 
dollar diamond industry, a 
world based on rituals and 
customs originating in me- 
dieval Europe and derived 
from Talmudic lessons, where 
contracts are based on a word 
and a handshake. 

12:35 p.m. The More- 
house Men (See Saturday, 
Under) 

1:50 p.m. Breaking Si- 
lence: The Story of the Sis- 
ters at DeSales Heights.* A 
150-year-old cloistered 
monastery in West Virginia is 
about to close and its 1 2 sur- 
viving sisters, many of 
them in their eighties and 
nineties, prepare to face the 
outside world. 

3.10 p.m. Ben Spock 
Baby Doctor. A fascinating 
portrait of America's pioneer- 
ing pediatrician. 



4:30 p.m. Gene Hunters 
(See Wednesday, Kaufmann) 



LINDER 

11:00 a.m. Pepper's Pow- 
Wow. (See Friday, Linder) 

11:50 a.m. The Trials of 
Telo Rinpoche. (See Thurs- 
day, Kaufmann) 

1245 p.m. Harold. 
(See Wednesday, Auditorium) 

2:00 p.m. Holy Madness 
(See Thursday, Kaufmann) 

3:15 p.m. Ghurbal* 
(See Saturday, Linder) 

Film Collective: 
Sankofa 

4:00 p.m. In Between. A 
Sri Lankan-bom filmmaker 
explores the shifting issues of 
cultural identity. 

455 p.m. Home Away 
from Home. An African 
woman in London, worried 
that her family will become 
too assimilated, builds a 
traditional mud hut — a pro- 
ject that leads to unexpected 
results. 



8 



Monday, 
October 23 

AUDITORIUM 

Closing Night Films 

6:30 p.m. Mother Dao the 
Turtlelike.* This film evokes 
the trauma of colonialism by 
repositioning footage from 
more than 200 silent propa- 
ganda films taken by Dutch 
colonists in Indonesia 
between 1912 and 1933. 
Its soundtrack of ancient and 
modem songs, poetry, and 
music gives voice to the in- 
digenous communities. 

8:40 p.m. The Vegetable 
Mob. (See Wednesday, 
Auditorium) 

9:00 p.m. A Kiss to this 
Land (Un Beso a esta 
Tierra). Elderly Jews from 
Eastern Europe recall their 
migration to Mexico in the 
1920s. 



KAUFMANN 

Ethnographic 
Update 

6:30 p.m. A Kalahari Fam- 
ily* (Work in progress) John 
Marshall has filmed and 
worked with the Ju/'hoasi of 
southwest Africa's Kalahari 
since the 1950s. The film 
focuses on the dispossession, 
dependence, and decline of 
people in the face of develop- 
ment. The screening will fea- 
ture selected clips and extended 
discussion with the director. 

9 15 p.m. Rouch in Re- 
verse. Jean Rouch, the father 



of ethnographic cinema and 
creator of shared anthropol- 
ogy is the focus of an impn ivi 
sational and playful film. 

UNDER 

6:30 p.m. 100 Children 
Waiting for a Train On Sat- 
urdays a church is 
transformed into a film work- 
shop as Chilean children are 
introduced to artists from 
Disney to Chaplin and learn 
to create their own animation. 

7:40 p.m. Kinshasa's 
Septembre Noir (Kinshasa's 
Black September). (French 
only) Youngsters at an anima- 
tion workshop use paper bags 
and line drawings to tell the 
story of the military takeover 
in their country. 

7.50 p.m, Bichorai. In 
1991 and 1994 a video- 
maker talked with Burundi 
street children who reveal 
their hopes and dreams in a 
country wracked by war. 

9:10 p.m. Alone Together 
Young people from widely 
different backgrounds share 
the pain and frustration of 
living with HIV 

9:40 p.m. Repeat: Alone 
Together. 



PEOPLE 
CENTER 

Film Collective: 
Appalshop 

630 p.m. Struggle on 



Coon Branch Mountain 
(Mimi Pickering B&W. 1972. 
13 min.) Residents of a small 
West Virginia community 
fight local government for 
improvements in roads, 
schools, and services. 

7:00 p.m. On Our ( I 
Land. (Anne Johnson. 1988. 
29 min.) The conflict between 
citizens who want to protect 
their land for future genera- 
tions and mineral extractors, 
who are driven solely by 
profit. 

7 45 p.m. Strangers and 
Kin: A History of the Hilt 
billy Image. (Herb E. Smith. 
1984, 58 min) This film 
traces the evolution of the 
hillbilly stereotype — as seen 
in feature films, musicals, and 
television portrayals — and 
examines how certain images 
are created, reinforced, and 
used to rationalize exploita- 
tion. 

9:00 p.m. Long Journey 
Home (Elizabeth Barret. 
1992, 58 min. Video ) A 
personal tour through 
Appalachia, focusing on the 
many ethnic groups that 
were drawn there by econo- 
mic opportunity and the hard- 
ships that forced them 
north. 

1015 p.m Bluegrass. 
Blackmarket. (Hans Luxem- 
burger. 1994, 28 min. 
Video.) A dismal economy 
has prompted some eastern 
Kentuckians to grow mari- 
juana in spite of the efforts 
of government agencies to 
eradicate this illegal 
industry. 




4 

) » 






: 






A Kiss to This Land, 8.50 p.m.. Auditorium 




Honorary Chairperson 

Mary Cdtherinr BateSOn 
Programmers 
Elaine S. Charnov 
Nathaniel Johnson, Ji 
Festival Assistant 
Sylvia Morales 



Funding 

lli,< Margarel Mead Rim 
and Video l estiva! ha 
ceived genen ius supp irl 
from the Natural l leril 
Irusi and New York State 
Council on the Ai 



Pepper's Pow-Wow 



Mother Dao the Turtlelike 




Breaking Silence: The Story of the 
Sisters at DeSales Heights 



1995 Margaret Mead Film and Video Festival 



Name: 



Add i 
City: 



.State. 






Daytime telephone: 



Number of tickets (AMNf I Member, non-Member, studenl 
with ID). 

Please circle one: I estiva! pas 'full week 

Daily ticket (indicate day) '•' l ' ' '«'»d — 

T-Shirt (large size only; color): green — purple 

Total: 

.se circle one: Check Mnster Card 

Credit card number - 

Expiration dale 



Month/Year 



_ Send me a symposium schedule (please check) 

Send self addressed, stamped envelope and this coupon 
a check payable to Margaret Mead Rln <>l to: 

Mean i. an Museum of Natur ..Central 

Park vvV reet. New York NY 1 0024-5 1 



A Kalahari Family 






The Department of Education Presents the 

Evening Lecture Series 



Volcanoes! 

Four Thursdays and two Tuesdays, 
Oct 26-Nov. 16; 7:00-8:30 p.m. 
$22.50 for Members. $25 for non-Members. 
$20 for students 

Volcanic eruptions are among the **»t dyramic 
of all geologic processes. There are more than 500 

the planets atmosphere and climate as well as its 

habitants ft «. «J£ iS ?° S ^^ces 

mc departments of Earth and Planetary fences 

and Educate m lore the contributions of 

volcanoes to the ge< pmentof other 

L I, as Mars and Venus 

P ,a BS: An Ancient 

School of Q iphy I nlversityofWash 

" tS' IfThe'/mpoc. o/ Volcanic Eruptions on (he 

rmati HaraldurSigui «* 

( (raduate School of I H eanography. University ot 
Rhode Is lani I Kingston. , M|( jj„ 

Nov 9 pinotubo/ Masslw ' rupMon and [Muddy 

Afte rfi '"'" 95 I hrMopher G. NewhaU, 

Geologist US Geologu y, Department of Geo- 

logical Sciences. University of Washington. 

'.', ' ' i , , v ', ,/canfsm: Lessons from Space and 
Time. James W. Head. Ill, prof. I Department of 
logi. al S. iences, Brown University, Providence 

Oct 31 and Nov 14: Volcanoes on Film. Films 
aboutvolcanii pi .,nd how they are studied 

win be shown from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Jboft 

„ngs. Question-and-answe. sessions will follow 
screenings of the films, which feature v. ;1< am es of 
ii.. md the Padfii "ring of fire 



Plants at the Edge 
of the Sea 

Fouj Mondays Od 16- Noi 6 

i -4:00 p.m.. or 
I, „n Thursdays. Oct. 26-Nov 16. 
7:00-8 :30 p.m 
|22.50 for Memo* 
$25 for non-Members 

The seaweeds and flowering plant- of the coastal 
dune and wetlands stabilize th« si .ore and are a key 
to marine productivity and biodiversity William 

lllei lecturei in botany in the Education Depart- 
mcn , ..,, 1 d.'i.uii...ii( .n and ecology of tide- 

>dthe plants of salt meadow, dune, and 

,IU '' o A 

I , lowering PlantsofSali Marshes, Dunes, and 
Rocky Coast, fteshon hetlde. 

2. Intertldat Seaweeds. Adaptation to a turbulent 

bronmenl Algae and people. 

,nd along the Mangrove 

Coail I :< ii itn ists b i vegi tetion below low tide 
4. r n the Maritime Woods The web of plant lite 
si edge. 

Avenues to the Past 

Fou. Thursdays, Oct. 5- Nov. 2 

10 9:00 p.m. 

'.50 for Members. 
$25 for non-Members 

Ethnohlstorlan Robert S.Grui 
jot.r sman will examine thi which 

, iini Hme and interpret history rtieylh 
Plore the impact of cuU lei theory, and method 

pn historical interpretation 

,i,i r , Oral Tracing met will examine the 

nature and hlstoricitj of myths legend 

Oct 12 WritU ' i Kfcords. Drawing on examples 
from colonial North America I Irumel will assess the 
,,„„,>. uiil.iv, and limitations ol documents by con- 
rces written at or near tl 
,1 with commi ntarles from a I itei time 
q ■,. p al I t'idence. Grumel will -how 
how ni widence of the past is collected 

rated, and Interpreted with a survey ol theabsol 
arid relative dating techniques used todetermin. 
ageofariil.nl- 

Nov. 2: New Directions. Using examples from 



10 




Volcanoes! 



excavations conducted in and around Greater New 
York Grossman will discuss the role and implications 
, ,1 ..pplied technology in the identification, definition, 
and documentation of archeological remains. 

Human Mimicry of Bird 
Sound 

Wednesday. Oct. 25 
7 00-8:30 p.m. 
| for Members 
$10 for non-Members 

Omithol. x ii Boswall will demonstrate how 

humans can reproduce the language of birds, and he'll 
i, ,11, ,U .! ii the variety of reasons to do so. touching on 
I , ,. ,n, i . i J 51 ieiu i ai i culture, and entertainment 
Boswall will conduct this unusual lecture with a vari- 
. ii i,l producing devices and audio recordings 
1 1, I! i ■ | (lain how to "talk" to birds — using whlsl 
pipes and tape recordings — and how to get them to 
respon« I. H - how musician- imitate avian 

sounds, describing how English musk hall entertainers 
l bird impersonal* elegant prose and the 

way- h composers from Beethoven to the Beat- 

uwe been inspired by birdsong. 

Orchids: A Botanical 
History 

Tuesdays. Nov. 14 and 21 
7:00-8:30 p.m 

$13.50 for Members. 
$15 for non- Members 

Orchids whi( h make up the largest of plant 



families, come in an unusual variety of shapes and 
have developed many survival strategies. This senes 
is presented in conjunction with the exhibition 

Orchids. 

Nov. 14: North American Orchids William 
Schiller, lecturer in botany in the Education Depart- 
ment, discusses the characteristics and ecology of 
orchids, focusing on North American species. 

Nov 21 Tropical Orchids of the Americas Keith 
Lloyd, author and overseer of the New York Botani 
cal Garden's living orchid collection, reviews the 
tropical American species of orchids — their charac- 
teristics, structures, and cultivation. 



Great Diamonds of India 

Monday. Oct 2 
7:00-8:30 p.m. 
$9 for Members. 
$10 for non-Members 

This program is for those who have a feeling for 
history, particularly that of great diamonds. These 
diamonds came from the Golconda region of India, 
near Delhi, and include the "bad luck" stones, the 
Hope, and the Koh-i-Noor. Some are held in the 
Diamond Fund of Russia in the Kremlin; others, the 
Regent and Sancy. are found in the Louvre The 
1730 sack of Delhi, the nineteenth-century mi 
of a Russian ambassador in Persia, and the love lite 
of Catherine the Great are fascinating elements ot 
the history of these jewels 

Brigadier Kenneth Mears is a former cavalry 
officer who served as a director of the British 
Intelligence Corps and as Deputy Governor of 
Security at the Tower of London, where his prune 
responsibility was the safety of the Crown Jewels 



Navajo and Tibetan 
Wisdom 

Monday and Tuesday. 
Oct. 16 and 17 
7:00-8:30 p.m. 
$13.50 for Members. 
$15 for non-Members 

Navajo Indians of the Colorado Plateau and 
denizens of the Tibetan Plateau share understand- 
ings of their connections to their respective environ- 
ments and to the even more remote realms of mind 
Fins ancient knowledge is carefully codified and 
internalized through vivid rituals. Anthropologist 
Peter Gold has recently written a book on this sub- 
ject and will augment his presentation with slides 
and on-location sound recordings. 

Oct. 16: Elemental Connections to the Nature 
of Things. Humans are considered by Tibetans and 
the Navajo as expressions of the unfolding of the 
universe. 

Oct 17 The Sacred World Within. Shared Ti- 
betan and Navajo principles and procedures for 
developing personal wisdom, wellness, peace, and 
social harmony. 

Maori Art: Korero Tahito, 
We All Have Our Legends 

Wednesday, Oct. 25 

7:00-8:30 p.m. 

$9 for Members, $10 for non-Members 

The messages of Maori art are buried deep within 
abstract patterns, where image and structure unite to 
promote thoughts that can be read at many levels. 
Although even a casual look at the surface design 
can reveal the intricacy, grace, and symmetry of 
Maori artwork, the more careful viewer is eventually 
drawn beyond a simple translation of images into 
more spiritual matters. 

John Bevan Ford, one of New Zealand's leading 
contemporary Maori artists, discusses the ideas and 






*l 



feelings behind his finely wrought colored ink draw- 
ings and sculptures. 

Introduction to Geology 

Three Tuesdays and three Thursdays. 
Jan. 16-Feb. 1 
700-830 p.m. 
$31.50 for Members. 
$35 for non-Members 

This Intensive course introduces the basic asp< 
of geology, including the movement of the conti- 
nents, volcanic activity, earthquakes, and mount. un 
building. The changes of land scales through the 
processes of weathering and erosion will be 
discussed, along with the constituents of rocks — the 
basic material of the earth 

Classes will meet twice a week for three weeks 
and use a textbook that will be available in the Mu- 
seum Shop Students who pass the exam will receive 
a special American Museum certificate. 

Field Trips, Walking Tours, 
and Workshops 

Human Evolution 
Workshops 

Friday. Oct. 13, 7:00-8:30 p.m.. or 
Saturday, Oct. 14, 7:00-8:30 p.m. 
$40 (no discount for Members) 
Materials included; 
limited to 25 people 

When only the bones remain, how much infor- 
mation about an individual can be reconstructed? 
Jeffrey H. Schwartz, professor of anthropology at 
the University of Pittsburgh and research associate 
in the Museum's Department of Anthropology, will 
present an introductory workshop that examines the 
conclusions of forensic anthropology. 

The workshop will begin with a lecture, and the 



• * 




Animal Drawing 



second half will be specimen oriented. A geographi- 
cally diverse sample of skeletal material will be avail 
able foi fiisthand study A reading lisl and handouts 
will be provided upon enrollment and prior to tin' 
workshop. 

Animal Drawing 

Eight Tuesdays, starting Oct. 10 
7:00-9:00 p.m 
$105 (no discount for Membo 
Materials not included; 
limited to 25 people 

Join Museum artlsl Stephen C Qulnn to sketch 
subjects such as gazelles on the African plains or 
timber wolves in the snowbound North. After the 
Museum has dosed to the public, students gatherto 
draw animals from the famed dioramas as well 
mounted skeletons in the halls of African Mamm 
North Amei Is and Mammals. Ocean Life, 

and Fossil Mammals. Individual guldaro en to 

1 i parflcipai il wl tether begn inei oi experienced 
artlsl Qulnn, who is senloi asslstanl managei In the 
Exhibition I V|..utin.m willdiscuss drawing tech 
nlque, animal anatomy, and the role of the artisi ai 
the Museum 

Fall Botany Walking Tours 
in Central Park 

Saturdays. Sept. 23 or Oct. 7, or 

Wed., Oct. 11 

9:00-11:00 a.m. 

$9 per walk 

(no discount for Meml>. 

Limited to 25 people 

Participants on tins two hour morning walk in Cen- 
tral Park will observe signs -I fall In the flowers and 
trees. They'll explore Strawberry I lelds I lemshe id 
and the Shakespeare I iarden and wat< h these areas 
. hangewith the season ["hey'll learn aboul plant 
Identification and <■< ology from William Schillei lei 
turei in botany in the I ducatlon Department. Walks 
will start at 72nd Siren ..... 1 1 entralParl V 









1995 REGISTRATION COUPON 

Please make check payable to the American 
M.i .urn of Natural History and mail with a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope to: Lecture 
Series, Education Dept , American Museum of 
Natural History, Central Park West at 79th 
Street. New York. NY 10024 5192. 

Please note that credit-card paymenl is now 
available and that registration Will he delayer I |j 

ime phone number or stamped, self- 
addressed envelope is not included. For further 
information call (212) 769-5310 



Name 



Address: 
City: 



.State: 



.Zip: 



i ne telephone: 



Membership category: 



Course 

No. tickets 



Day 



e (each) 



i [i .ui 
Total 



Course 

No tickets 



Day 



.Price (each) 



Hour 

I. .Ml 



Total amount enclosed: 



Payment: Check Money Order 

_MC _Visa 



Account no 



Expiration date:. 



Month/Year 



I 



11 



Use the coupon on page 1 1 to register for these 
programs. 

Fall Bird Walks in 
Central Park 

Tuesdays, Sept. 5- Oct. 31 
7:00-9:00 a.m., or 
Thursdays, Sept. 7- Oct. 26 
9:00-11:00 am 
$50 for Tuesday series, 
$44 for Thursday series 
(no discount for Members) 

Observe the autumn migration of birds through 
Central Park with naturalists Stephen C. Quinn 
| I i, * I .,■ | and Harold Feinberg (Thursdays). Learn 
how to US€ field marks, habitat, behavior, and song 

aids in bird identification. Participants meet across 
from the Museum on the northeast comer of Central 
Park West and 77th Street. Call (212) 769-5310 for 
availability I united to 25 people. 

Cape May Birding 
Weekend 

I ri Sun., Oct. 20-22 

$350 per person, double occupancy 

(i i. . discount for Members) 



Join Museum naturalists for a weekend of b.rding at 
Cape May, New Jersey, one of the world's bird- 
watching hot spots. The trip includes naturalist-led 
walks informal lectures, a stop at the famed Bngan- 
tine National Wildlife Refuge, and two boat excursions 
to observe seabirds and possibly whales and dolphins. 

Fee includes accommodations, food, and trans- 
portation. Trip leaders are Brad Bumham. instructor 
in the Education Department, and naturalist Stephen 
C. Quinn. an experienced birder. Call (111) /o*- 
5310 for an itinerary. Limited to 45 adults. 



Hudson River 

Lighthouse 

Explorations 

Saturday, Oct. 14; 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. 
$50 (no discount for Members) 

Visit the Tarrytown Lighthouse with educator 
Christopher Letts of the Hudson River Foundation. 
Explore the lighthouse and learn about past and 
present river navigation, the lives of lighthouse fami- 
lies, and the natural history of estuarine systems 

After the lighthouse visit, participants will investi- 
gate problems of river ecology through simulated oil 
spills, water pollution clean-up activities, and study 
of riverine organisms. Uta Gore, senior instructor in 
the Education Department, leads this trip Bring a 
box lunch. Limited to 25 people. 



Walking Tour of 

New York's Chinatown 

Saturday, Oct. 28; 10:30 a.m.-l:30 p.m. 
$20 (no discount for Members) 

Investigate the vegetable, meat, noodle, tea. and 
herb stores of Chinatown with an expert. Karen 
Kane, senior instructor in the Education Depart- 
ment, has lived and cooked in China and has lec- 
tured on herbs and food in Chinese medicine. She 
will explain the regional cuisines of China and the 
blend of seasonal, medicinal, and religious beliefs 
revolving around food. There will be several tasting 
opportunities during and after the tour. Limited to 
25 people. 

Lost Cities, Lost Peoples 

Friday, Nov. 3; 7:00-8:30 p.m. 
$10 (no discount for Members) 

"The most beautiful thing we can experience is 
the mysterious," according to Albert Einstein; "it is 
the source of all true art and science." Some of 
science's great mysteries arose from now-vanished 
civilizations. Museum docent and lecturer Robert 
Campanile will lead an exploration of halls and ex- 
hibits in search of lost cities and peoples. Limited to 
25 people. 



Fall 1995 
Children's 
Workshops 

These workshops are pre- 
sented by the Department of 
Education. Use the coupon on 
this page to register. Children 
enrolled in \hree-hour pro 
grams should bring a bag 
lunch U you have .my ques- 
tions call (212) 769-5310. 

Call Me Ahnighito 

Sunday, Oct. 1 
Ages 7 and 8 
10:30 a.m.-noon 

Inspiration can be fount l 
anywhere, especially in the 
halls ant I displays of a great 
museum Tins workshop 
teaches young writers how to 
get ideas from the world 
around them and how to begin 
the writing process. Pam Con- 
i.i. I tells how the dinosaurs on 
the fourth floor inspired her to 
write the popular book My 
Daniel and how the Museum's 
meteorite was the source for 
her newest book. Call Me 
Ahnighito. $20. 

Beautiful Swimmers 

Sunday. October 29 
Ages 8 and ' I 
ii).30a.m.-l:30p.m. 

( Inldren learn about saw- 
fish, sharks and angelfish and 
explore fish adaptations 
through games, fish printing, 
songs, film, and a visit to the 
I [all ,,1 0( ean Life. Presented 
by Merryl Kafka, assist ant 
director of education at the 
New York Aquarium for 
Wildlife Conservation. $25. 

Recycling Nature 

Two Sundays, October 15 
and 22; ages 9 and 10 
10 10 I 1 30 a.m. 

Pari it ipantS will discover 
how easy it is to recycle 
l ilants to make their own 
lamps. They'll learn the 
• hernistry and electricity of 
lamp in, they create 



their own blender lampshades 
and electrify a lamp to take 
home Presented by Susan 
Keeser, children's education 
programmer at the National 
Science Foundation. $30. 

Maya Fun 

Sunday, October 15 

Ages 9 and 1 1 1 

10:30 a.m.-l 30 p.m. 

Maya life in the Yucatan is 
related through folk tales at 
this workshop, where kids 
will make traditional Maya 
folding books They will also 
hear about the drink of Maya 
kings and celebrate with a 
pifiata. Presented by Judith 
Dupre, author and curator of 
i ultural events for Native 
Americans. $30. 

Animal House 

Saturday, November 4 

Ages 8 and 9 

10:30 a.m.-l :30 p.m. 

Just like us. animals need 
the comfort and safety of a 
home. Children will learn how 
and where animals build their 
homes by searching the diora- 
mas for animal homes above 
and under the ground, in trees, 
webs, and other unexpected 
places. Presented by Laura 
Weinstein and Robert Cam- 
panile. Museum tour guides 
and lecturers. $25. 

Halloween Surprise 

Sunday, October 22 
Ages 9 and 10 
10:30 am. -1:30 p.m. 

In anticipation of Halloween 
festivities, children can create 
their own moving skeleton 
figures. A trip to the new halls 
of dinosaurs. Early Fossil 
Mammals, and Human Biol- 
ogy is included. Presented by 
Ross Lewis, artist and chil- 
dren's art educator. $25. 

Human Origins 

Two Sundays, October 22 
and 29: ages 10-12 
10:30 a.m.-l :30p.m 
Children use Museum casts 



of fossil ancestors to broadly 
trace our evolutionary lineage 
and that of other primates A 
lab session comparing skeletal 
material of modem humans 
and chimpanzees will help 
illustrate similarities and differ- 
ences among primates. Pre- 
sented by Anita Steinhart, 
doctoral candidate in physical 
anthropology. $30. 

A Whales Tale 

Sunday, October 29 
Age 4 (each child must be 
accompanied by an adult) 
10:30-11:30 a.m. 

Children will help tell the 
tale of a humpback whale's 
migration from the warm wa- 
ters of the south to the colder 
northern seas. Film, song, a 
take-home activity sheet, and 
a visit to the Hall of Ocean 
Life are included. Presented by 
Dayna Reist. former instructor 
at the New York Aquarium 
and specialist in early child- 
hood education. $20. 



All About Fish 

Sunday, November 5 
Age 5 (each child must be 
accompanied by an adult) 
10:30 a.m.-noon 

Children will learn about 
fish shapes and how fish 
breathe and swim in a hands- 
on program that includes 
making fish prints and visiting 
the Hall of Ocean Life. Pre- 
sented by Judith Levy, who 
has taught at the Carnegie 
Museum of Art. $20. 

Storytelling 

Sunday. November 5 
Ages 9 and 10 
10:30 a.m.-l:30 p.m. 

Children will hear stories in 
the halls of Asian Peoples, 
African Peoples, and Native 
Americans. They'll share 
family stories that they've 
prepared at home and create 
a storyboard. Presented by 
Marcia Land, director of educa- 
tion at Lincoln Center. $25. 



Microscopic 
Adventures 

Saturday, November 18 

Ages 8-10 

10:30 a.m.-l:30p.m 

The miniature world of fish, 
scales, feathers, fur, crystals, 
and insects comes to life under 
the microscope. Participants 
can bring their own "dust bun- 
nies'' or small objects to view 
under the microscope. Pre- 
sented by Uta Gore, science 
instructor in the Education 
Department. $25. 

How We Hear and 
How We See 

Sunday, November 19 

Ages 7 and 8 

10:30 a.m.-l:30 p.m. 



Exciting experiments focused 
on vision and hearing are con- 
ducted in this workshop, in 
which children make drums and 
kaleidoscopes. Presented by 
Dina Schlesinger, computer 
science teacher at PS 140. $25. 

Drawing Fossils 

Sunday, November 19 

Age 8 

10:30 am -1:30 p.m. 

Children learn the funda- 
mentals of drawing with pen 
and ink, watercolor 
techniques, and contour draw- 
ing. They'll study basic animal 
anatomy and sketch in the 
new dinosaur halls and in Early 
Fossil Mammals. Presented by 
Angela Tripi-Weiss, art direc- 
tor at PS 87. $25. 



DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
Workshops for Young People 

1 would like to register for the following workshop(s): 



Workshop: . 
Workshop: . 



Student's last name: 



First: 



Age:. 



Grade: 



Parent's last name: 



First: 



Daytime phone (area code): 
Address: 



City: 



.State: 



.Zip:. 



Total amount enclosed: 



Method of payment □ Check □ Visa D MasterCard 

Credit card no.: . 

Expiration date: Month: Year: 

Register early. Class sizes are limited. Separate check 
per workshop or course. Please note that due to limited 
registration discounts are not available for these workshops 
Send this coupon with your check or money order payable to 
the American Museum of Natural History and a self- 
addressed, stamped envelope to: Workshops for Young 
People. Department of Education. American Museum of 
Natural History. 79th Street and Central Park West. New 
York. NY 10024-5192 



12 



Urban Shores: 
Jamaica Bay 
by Land and Sea 

Saturday, November 4 



Naturalists from the Ameri- 
can Museum and the National 
Park Service's Gateway Na- 
tional Recreation Area will 
host a walk and cruise of the 
Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge. 

Participants will walk along 
two miles of trails and cruise 
through the waters of this 
10.000-acre urban estuarine 
system. They* II see migrating 
coastal birds and hear about 
Jamaica Bay's history and 
current issues surrounding 
this island-dotted lagoon. The 
walks are guided and the 
cruise is narrated. 

Ticket prices include lunch, 
which will be catered by Ab- 
braciamento's-on-the-Pier. 
Members' tickets are $50 for 
those who travel indepen- 
dently to the refuge and $65 
for those who opt for bus 
transportation from the Mu- 
seum. Non-Members' tickets 



are $60 without bus fare and 
$75 with bus fare. The bus 
leaves the Museum at 9:00 
a.m. and the program starts 
at the refuge at 10:00 a.m., 
rain or shine. Traveling in- 
structions will be sent with 
tickets. 

To order tickets send your 
check payable to the Ameri- 
can Museum of Natural His- 
tory and a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to: Urban 
Shores, Environmental Pro- 
grams, American Museum of 
Natural History, Central Park 
West at 79th Street, New 
York, NY 10024-5192. Be 
sure to include a separate 
sheet of paper on which 
you've indicated your name, 
address, daytime telephone 
number, number of tickets, 
and amount of the check. 
Call (212) 769-5750 for fur- 
ther information. 



Coming Soon! 



The Museum is organizing 
a Centralized Reservations 
and Ticketing Service. With 
one phone call to this new 
office you'll be able to reserve 
and purchase tickets for all 
Museum and Planetarium 



events. Visits to the Museum 
will be easier too, since you'll 
be able to purchase tickets 
for all events at any entrance 
Stay tuned for more informa- 
tion on how to use this 
new service. 



Is New York City's 
Water Safe to Drink? 

Wednesday, September 27 

6:30 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$5 for Members, $8 for non-Members 



Because of questions about 
the quality of the city's drinking 
water, the City Club of New 
York invited a panel of inde- 
pendent experts to compile a 
status report on the safety of 
tap water. After months of 
research, review of reports, and 
dozens of interviews, the panel 
will present its final report. 

The panel also evaluated the 
safety of substitute sources of 
water (e.g., bottled water and 
soft drinks) and of home filters 
and purifiers as well as the 
threat of the parasite Cryp- 
tosporidium to immune-sup- 
pressed individuals. After the 
presentation of the report the 
meeting will be open to 
questions and discussion from 
the audience 

The panelists are Edward 



Gershey, the New York 
Academy of Medicine, David 
Locke, the New York 
Academy of Science; and Sid- 
ney Horenstein, Amencan 
Museum of Natural History. 
To order tickets send your 
check payable to the American 
Museum of Natural History 
and a self-addressed, stamped 
envelope to: Water. Environ- 
mental Programs. American 
Museum of Natural History. 
Central Park West at 79th 
Street, New York. NY 10024- 

5192. Be sure to include a 
separate sheet of paper on 
which you've indicated your 
name, address, daytime tele- 
phone number, number of 
tickets and amount of the 
check.' Call (212) 769-5750 
for further information. 



Science and Music Festival 1995 

Four Sundays, October 8-29 
11:00 a.m -5:00 p.m. 



The Museum will celebrate 
it-. 125 years of expeditions 
explorations, and discovery 
with science festivals on Octo- 
ber 8 and 22 and music festi- 
vals on October 15 and 29. 
The free festivals will be held 
in the Museum's many exhibi- 
tion halls, theaters, the Hay- 
den Planetarium, and 
outdoors. 

Highlights include dinosaur- 



theme activities such as a fun 
with fossils'' program and a 
dinosaur dig, a dinosaur qi 
tion-and-answer progrnn In . 
from the fourth-floor halls, 
and computer activities such 
as Nature on Computers and 
Dinosaurs on CD-ROM. 
Other highlights are a natural 
history documentary film pro- 
gram, science workshops and 
presentations on urban gar 



dening. ethnobotany and tra- 
ditional healing methods, and 
international cooking rhen 
will als< i telling and 

natural liistory puzzles and 
games. 

On October 8 Museum 
scientists will be oi I I iai id to 
identify visitors' artif<n i 
objei ts, and spe< Imens. 

( .,11(212)70" i U5 for 
further information. 






Noh Theater of Japan 

Saturday, September 9 
1:00 p.m. 






Umewaka Rokuro & 
Company will give a perfor- 
mance of Noh, Japan - cla 
cal theatrical tradition, at a 
free program in the Hall of 
Ocean Life This program 
presented in conjunction with 
the American Museum s 
125th anniversary and in 
celebration of the 35th an- 
niversary of the sister city 
relationship between Tokyo 
and New York. 

The company will perform 
Tsuchigumo (The Earth Spi- 
der), one of the most visually 
dramatic works of the Noh 
repertoire, in which a 
supernatural demon spicln 
disguised as a priest, ensnares 
its victims in a magnifu i n it 
series of webs The play is 
from the period during which 
most of the Noh plays were 
written, between the four- 
teenth and fifteenth cental 
and it combines dram, 
of poetry with music, masked 
dance, and elaborate 
costumes. The company will 
also perform Kagvu (The 
Snail), from the Kyogen, 
Noh's counter-comedic genre. 

This program is part of the 
Education Department s series 
Multicultural Mosaic I 

is of a Diverse So< 
further information about the 
series, call (212) 769-5315, 
Monday through Friday. 
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 pm 



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John Burroughs Programs 



John Burroughs (1837- 
1921) was a leading literary 
ritlc and pioneer in the new 
school of nature wnting. The 
John Burroughs Association, 
Inc.. presents programs and 
talks to preserve historic na- 
tional landmarks in the 
Catskills associated with Bur- 
roughs life. 



Join the friends of the John 
Burroughs Association on 
October 6. 7. and 8. for a 
centennial celebration. Slab- 
sides. The First Hundred 
Years is centered on the cabin 
of naturalist-wnter John Bur- 
roughs. Some of the essays 
that made Burroughs a cele- 
brated author were wntten at 



Slabsides, and this special 
event is presented in honor of 
the cabin's 100th anniver 

Slabsides is located In West 
Park, New York, on the 
Hudson River, 80 miles north 
of New York City and 10 
miles south of Kingston. 
For more information call 
(212)769-5169. 



13 



Courses for Stargazcrs 




ASTRONOMY: 
BASIC COURSES 

Introduction to 
Astronomy 

Eight Mondays, beginning 
Sept. 18 or eight Tuesdays, 
beginning Sept. 19; 
6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

A first course in astronomy, 
designed to introduce the 
many interesting aspects of the 
universe to those without a 
math or physics background. 
Topics include earth as a 
planet, the moon, the solar 
system, the stars, the Milky 
Way, galaxies, quasars, and 
black holes. Common observa- 
tions such as planet motions 
and the rising and setting of 
the sun and moon are 
explained. This course serves 
as a prerequisite for the Inter- 
mediate-level courses, where 
specific areas are covered in 
more detail. Instructors- Craig 
Small and Henry Bartol. 

Adventures in 
Astronomy 

Seven Saturdays, beginning 
Sept. 23; 9:40-11:40 a.m. 
$76.50 for Members 
$85 for non-Members 

Confused about the differ- 
ence between a star and a 
planet? Can't tell astronomy 
From astrology? Don't know 
Aquarius From Sagittarius or a 
black hole from a brown 
dwarf? Join us foi a Saturday 
course for the whole family 
hi and up) In the Sky 
I heater and in labs with a 
nomical equipment we will 

the birth and death of 
stars the <>\\<\\\\ of the uni- 

,i> li i. it extrater- 
itrial life, and the current 
Instructoi 
Small. 

Celestial Highlights 

Font selected Mondays: 
Sept. IS. Oct L6 
Nov. 13, Dec 11 
0-7:40 p.m. 
$36 for Membi 
$40 for non-Members 

Tins course Will locus on 

the int< resting and exciting 
events in thi A the 

i oming month ["he night sky 
will be accurately simulated by 
the Zeiss projector in the Sky 
Theater, and students will 
learn how to find prominent 



constellations of the season 
and where and when to see 
gatherings of the moon and 
planets. The Planetarium's 
extensive collection of special 
effects will illustrate upcoming 
celestial events, including 
meteor showers and eclipses. 
Students will also learn about 
current space missions and 
how to find nebulae, star 
clusters, and galaxies that are 
visible through binoculars or 
small telescopes. Instructors: 
Joe Rao and Henry Bartol. 

How to Use a Telescope 

Eight Mondays, beginning 
Sept. 18; 6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

An introduction to choosing 
and using a small amateur 
telescope. Topics include 
basic optics of telescopes, 
equatorial and altitude-azimuth 
mountings, eyepieces, colli- 
mating a telescope, setting up 
for observation, locating 
objects in the sky, and the use 
of charts and other aids for 
observation. No previous 
knowledge of astronomy is 
assumed. This course is 
particularly recommended for 
those considering the pur- 
chase of a telescope and for 
those who have one but aren't 
sure how to use it. Instructor: 
Sam Storch. 



ASTRONOMY: 

INTERMEDIATE 

COURSES 

From Copernicus to 
Einstein 

Seven Wednesdays, 
beginning Sept. 20 
6-30-8:40 p.m. 
$81 for Members 
$90 for non-Members 

This survey course exam- 
ines i«nii ol the great scientific 
ideas thai revolutionized 
astronomy and p ihe 

mechanical certainty of 
Coperni imy; 

Galileo's physics and astron- 
omy; Newton s physics; and 
; itivity ol time 

and space. Non-mathematical 
presentations of each theory 
will offer historical and 
schematic insights into the 
ways in which these profound 
ideas have affected the defini 
tion ol reality. No formal 
training in physics or math is 
required. Instructor: William 
Dorsey. 



Cosmology: The Big 
Picture 

Five Thursdays, beginning 
Sept. 21; 6:30-8:40 p.m. 

$72 for Members 
$80 for non-Members 

This course will briefly re- 
view the natural history of the 
physical universe, from 
quarks to galaxies, as revealed 
by contemporary astronomy 
and high-energy physics. 
Topics will include the infla- 
tionary Big Bang, elemental 
nucleosynthesis, the three- 
degree background radiation, 
cold dark matter, and the 
future of the cosmos. Discus- 
sions will consider the histori- 
cal and philosophical context 
for modem cosmology along 
with the latest results from the 
COBE satellite and the Hubble 
Space Telescope. Instructor: 
Michael Allison. 

The Life Cycles of Stars 

Six Wednesdays, beginning 
Sept. 20; 6:30-8-10 p.m. 
$76.50 for Members 
$85 for non-Members 

Two impressive things 
about stars are their visual 
impact and their evolution 
over millions and billions of 
years. Stars follow prescribed 
life cycles from embryo to 
various terminal stages, and 
this course will trace the past 
and future histories of the sun 
and other stars found in the 
dust lanes and gas clouds of 
the Milky Way. All stars reach 
terminal stages — most, in- 
cluding the sun, end up as 
slow-cooling white dwarf 
stars, others may become 
denser neutron stars. The 
class will conclude with a 
discussion of the more mas- 
sive stars that may become 
black holes. Instructor: Sune 
Engelbrektson. 

METEOROLOGY 

Weather and Climate 

Eight Thursdays, beginning 
Sept. 21: 6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$85.50 for Members 
$95 for non-Members 

Everyone talks about the 
weather. This course is for 
those who would like to know 
more about the atmosphere 
— how it works and how it 
affects us. Topics include the 
structure and motions of the 
atmosphere, climate, weather 
forecasting, and atmospheric 
optics such as rainbows, 
halos, and twinkling stars. 
Instructor: Barry Grossman. 



and aircraft ownership. Sub- 
jects include physiological fac- 
tors affecting pilot 
performance, visual and elec- 
tronic navigation (VOR. ADF. 
DME. SAT, NAV. and 
LORAN). charts, publications, 
computers, principles of 
aerodynamics, and weather. 
Students will plan cross-coun- 
try trips and may use the 
flight deck simulator. Instructor. 
Ted Cone. 

Ground School for 
Instrument Pilots 

Fifteen sessions. Tuesdays 
and Thursdays, beginning 
Sept. 19; 6:30-9:00 p.m. 
$166.50 for Members 
$185 for non-Members 

Intended for those planning 
to take the FAA written exam- 
ination for an instrument 
rating. Class meets twice a 
week, concurrently with 
Ground School for Private 
and Commercial Pilots (see 
above for details). 

NAVIGATION: 
BASIC COURSE 

Navigation in Coastal 
Waters 

Eight Mondays, beginning 
Sept. 18; 6:30-9:00 p.m. 
$99 for Members 
$110 for non-Members 

An introduction to piloting 
and dead reckoning for pres- 
ent and prospective owners 
of small boats. The course 
provides practical chartwork 
and includes such topics as 
the compass, bearings, fixes, 
buoys and lighthouses, the 
running fix, current vectors 
and tides, and rules of the 
nautical road. Boating safety 
is emphasized. No prerequi- 
sites. Students are required 
to purchase an equipment kit. 
Instructor: Greg Smith. 



AVIATION 

Ground School for 
Private and Commercial 
Pilots 

Fifteen sessions, Tuesdays 
and Thursdays, beginning 
Sept. 19: 6:30-9:00 p.m. 
$166.50 for Members 
$185 for non-Members 

This course helps private 
and commercial pilots prepare 
for the FAA written examina- 
1 1 ii is It can also help as a 
refresher for biennial flight 
reviews, relieve some instances 
of fear of flying, and survey 
some aspects of flight training 



NAVIGATION: 

INTERMEDIATE 

COURSES 

Introduction to Celestial 
Navigation 

Ten Thursdays, beginning 
Sept. 21; 6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$99 for Members 
$110 for non-Members 

This intermediate course is 
for those who have completed 
Navigation in Coastal Waters 
or who have equivalent piloting 
experience. The course covers 
the theory and practice of 
celestial navigation, the sextant 
and its use, and the complete 
solution for a line of position. 
Problem solving and chartwork 
are emphasized. Students are 
required to purchase a copy of 
Sight-Reduction Tables for 
Marine Navigation, Volume 3 
(Pub. No. 229). Instructor: 
Greg Smith. 

Troubleshooting 
Celestial Navigation 

Four Tuesdays, beginning 
Sept. 19 or Oct. 17 
6:30-8:40 p.m. 
$67.50 for Members 
$75 for non-Members 

This short course is 
designed for students who are 
self-taught or otherwise famil- 
iar with techniques for navi- 
gating by the stars but in need 
of some practice. Sessions will 
include a review of the basic 
theory; use of Volume 1 HO 
249, the Rude Star Finder 
and Nautical Almanac for 
precalculations of star sights; 
calculation of LAN and twi- 
light for star sights; review of 
star sights, moon shots, planet 
shots, and plotting; and use of 
celestial computers, sextants 
and shooting techniques. No 
text is required; handouts will 
be provided. This course will 
be offered twice each term. 
Instructor: David Berson. 



1 



Courses for Stargazers 



would like to register for the following Planetarium course(s): 



Name of course: 



Price; (Please note that discount prices apply only to 

Participating and Higher Members.) 

Class beginning: 



Name: 

Address: 
City: 



.State: 



.Zip:. 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category: 



Please mail this coupon with your check payable to the 
American Museum-Hayden Planetarium to: Courses for 
Stargazers, Hayden Planetarium, Central Park West at 81st 
Street, New York, NY 10024-5192. Registration by mail is 
strongly recommended and is accepted until seven days 
preceding the first class. For additional information, call 
(212) 769-5900, Monday-Friday, 9:30 am -4:30 p.m. 
No credit cards accepted. Do not include ticket re- 
quests or checks for American Museum programs. 



14 



Museum 
Notes 



Hours 

Exhibition Halls 

Mon.-Thurs. & Sun 10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

Fri . &Sat 10:00a.m.-8:45 p.m. 

The Museum Shop 

Mon.-Thurs. & Sun. 10:00 a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

Fri. & Sat 10:00 a.m.-7:45 p.m. 

The Junior Shop 

Mon.-Fri ... 10:00 a.m. -4:45 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun. 10:00a.m.-5:45 p.m. 

The Museum Library 

s -Fri. ... 11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

The Natural Science Center 

The Natural Science Center will be closed for the 
month of September. 
The Discovery Room 

The Discovery Room will be closed for the 
month of September 



Museum Dining 

Diner Saurus Fast Service Eat. 

Daily 11:00 a m -1 

Garden Cafe 

Reservations.- (212) 769 5865 

Lunch Mon.-Fn 11:30 a.m.-3 30 p m 

Dinner Fn. & Sat i 00-7:30 p.m. 

Brunch: Sat. & Sun 1 100 am -4.00 p.m. 

Whale's Lair 

Fn 3:00 8:00 p.m. 

Sat Noon-S00 p.m. 

Sun. & most holidays Noon-5:00 p.m. 

Snack Carts 

Sat. & Sun 1 1:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

Entrances 

During Museum hours visitors can enter the 
building through the 77th Street entrance, the 
Planetarium entrance (81st Street), the first- and 
second-floor Roosevelt Memorial Hall entrant 
(79th Street and Central Park West), or through 
the subway entrance. 

Visitors attending programs after hours 
can enter the building at 79th Street and 
Central Park West or through the parking 
lot at 81st Street. 



Phone Numbers 

Museum Information (212) 769-5100 

rtbership information (foi \s about 

Museum events) (21 <>06 

Participating Memb rs' Customer J i 
(for questions ond probi Rotunda 

and Natural History magazine — missed 
address changes, and otlu u 
in/.. (800)28. 

Planetarium information (212) 769-5900 

Education Department (212) 69 -310 

Discovery Tun,- (212) • <, 0-5700 

toll free outside NY State (800) 462 8687 
IMAX- (212) /O9-5650 

Dcwiopment/P. il >lii (2 1 2) 769-52 1 1 

Volunteer Offic. (212 -66 

Museum Shop " -»50 

Library Services (212)769-5400 

Nature/ History magazine >00 

Members BookProyum >00 

Members Birthday Parties (212) 769-5542 

Planned Giving Office (212) 769 .119 

toll-free outside NY State (800] I i 1-5734 



Happenings at the Hayden 



Lecture 

Frontiers in Astronomy and 
Astrophysics 

On Wednesday. October 11, at 7:30 p.m.. NASA 
astronaut Ellen Baker will give an illustrated talk 
about her recent flight aboard the Atlantis and the 
space shuttle's docking with the Russian space 

ition Mir. 

This lecture is part of the Frontiers in Astronomy 
and Astrophysics series. Tickets are $6 for 
Participating and Higher Members and $8 for non- 
Members. For additional information, call 
(212) 769-5900 

Sky Shows 

The Ten Most-Asked Questions about 
the Universe 

What is a black hole? Is there life elsewhere in 
the universe? How will the universe end? This Sky 
Show answers these and other frequently asked 
questions about space. Through September 4. 



Cosmic Mind Bogglers 

If we could journey through space looking for "cos- 
mic record holders," where would we find them? 
Where are the tallest mountains? The grandest 
canyons? The hottest stars? The largest, most bizam- 
or most mysterious things in creation? Visit these and 
other Cosmic Mind Bogglers in the Planetarium's 
new show. Premieres September 7. 

Showtimes: 

Mon -Fri.: . .1:30, 2 30, 3:30. and 430 p.m. 
Sat . .1:00. 2:00. 3:00. 4:00. and 5:00 p.m. 
Sun 1 00, 2:00. 3:00. and 4:00 p.m. 

Admission (Participating and Higher Members) 

Adults: $5 

Children (2-12): $3 
Call (212) 769-5100 for additional information 
and non-Members' prices. Please note that prices 
and schedules are subject to change without notice 

Children's Shows 

Special shows for children and their families are 
offered every Saturday and Sunday at 1 1:00 a.m. 

Teddys Quest, for ages 3 to 9, tells the story of a 
teddy bear who travels through space and discov. 
the answers to such questions as how stars are 
formed, how to identify constellations, and what 11 5 
like on the moon. Every Sunday at 1 1 00 a.m. 



IMAX Theater 



Two new movies are currently showing in the 
IMAX* Theater. Destiny in Space and Titamca 
Narrated by Leonard Nimoy. Destiny in Space fo- 
cuses on the intricate partnership of humans and 
robots in the future of space exploration. It is the 
newest feature in the trilogy that includes The 
Dream Is Alive and Blue Planet. Titanica. which 
was shot during an international scientific expedi- 
tion, takes audiences 12.500 feet beneath die 
murky North Atlantic to the haunting site of the 
wreck of the Titanic , 

Showtimes for Destiny in Space are 10:30 and 
11:30 a.m. and 1:30 and 3:30 p.m. daily^ Titamca 
>wn at 12:30. 230, and 4:30 p.m. On Fnday 
and Saturday at 6:00 and 7:30 p.m. the films are 
shown on a double-feature bill: double-feature tickets 
are also available during the day. Each film is 40 
minutes long , 

Admission for Participating and Higher Members 



Destiny in Space 



is $5 for adults and $3 for children for single f. 
tures and $7 for adults and $4 for children for dou- 
ble features A dinner/theater package, which 
includes dinner in the Garden Cafe and the IMAX 
double feature, is available for $22 to Particip, 
and Higher Members. Call (212) 769-5350 for in 
formation about the package and for reservat>< 



Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show for 
preschoolers. Children sing along with Images ol 
their favorite Sesame Street Muppets a they learn 
about rainbows the phases of the moon, sunsel 
and stars. Sat . Sepl 9 al il OOa.m 

The Secret ../ the ( 'ardboard Rot feel foi age 6 
to 9, explores all i 'I the major objects In o 

in in. hiding the sun, moon. ..ill nine plan 
and some of their satellites. Saturdays, Sepl " l 1 ' 

and 23. at 11:00 a m 

Robots in Space feature* I ucasfil 11 >'■' and 

C-3PO-* and has been create, I espei ially lor children 
ages 7 to 12. T<> • ith a live host th 

farm ius space robots take children on a Journey 
from the earth to other planets and dl tani bl 
holes. Sat., Sept. 30, at 11:00 a.m 

rickets can be purchased the day ol the show. 

Admiss foi Partli Ipi | and 1 lighei Member 

is $5 for adults and $3 for children. For additional 
information, call (212 100 

Laser Light Shows 

Journey into another dimension when I. 

als and rock music combine to create a dazzl ' ' 

experience of sight and sound. Shows ar< pr< isented 
on Fridays and Saturdays at 7:00, 8:30 and 10:00 
p.m. For prices and show schedule, telephone 
(212) 769 r -100 




Too Much Mail? 



New Parking Policy 



Parking Is no longer complimentary foi people 
,iii, ruling evening programs I oi inf. irm.iti'.n ,il>. ml 
parkingrates call (212) 769-5238. 

The parking lol Is open everyday from 7:00 a.m. 
till 1 1 :30 p.m. The parking lot ha a ( apacity i il 

ill Irs and is opened on a firsl come fa 
served I li I 

Call the Membership Office at (2 '5606 

for information about alternative parkin, j 






' 






; 



The Membership Office re ently mailed a letter 

to pr. Members asking them to ji til 

um in spite ol oui besl efforts to the 

names of our cun ml Members from tins mailing. 

1 1 iay have ret eived one oi I Vase 

i.jlogy Would you consider pa 
letter on to a friend? Your help in reaching new 
Members is greatly <m ted. 



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For Family/Dual and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



L996 




The new Hall of Vertebrate Origins, al- 
though it is the last in the sequence of 
fourth-floor renovations, shows the evi- 
dence of the beginnings of our extended 
vertebrate family, stretching back 500 mil- 
lion years. 

On the left, a wire reconstruction con- 
taining the cast of a skull and jaws of an 
unknown species o/Orthacanthus. a shark 
that grew to be as long as 8-10 feet and 
lived 280 million years ago. Below, the 
installation of Stupendemys geographicus — 
the largest known turtle, which lived 5 mil- 
lion years ago off the coast of South Amer- 
ica. The skeleton and shell, measuring over 
eleven feet in length, is a cast but the skull 
was sculpted by a preparator from the Mu- 
seum's vertebrate paleontology lab. 









V 






. 



J BccMl 



500 Million Years 

of Vertebrate Evolution 

Fourth-Floor Restoration 
Near Completion 




With the opening in June of the fourth-floor 
Hall of Vertebrate Origins and the innovative 
Orientation Center, the American Museum of 
Natural History completes the final phase of 
its ambitious seven-year renovation and 
restoration project of the halls of vertebrate 
evolution (evolution of animals with 
backbones). The redesign creates a loop < > 
halls — all restored to their original architec- 
tural grandeur — which house the largest and 
most spectacular collection of vertebrate fossils 
on display anywhere in the world. 

Visitors can begin their tour of the fourth 
floor at the Miriam and Ira D Wallach On. n 
tation Center, which will offer background 
information on the exhibits There, they will 
be greeted by a fleshed-out model of a juvenile 
barosaur and a video introducing the major 
theme of the halls: what do we know about 
long-extinct vertebrates and what aspects of 
their lives remain unresolved? 

One thing we know a great deal about is 
how long ago these animals lived. A series of 
computer stations along one wall of the Orlen 
tation Center lets visitors travel back in evolu- 
tionary time The Timelines computer 
program is activated when a visitor choos. 
ancient era that he or she would like to ex- 
plore. The image of our modem world on 
screen then begins to transform as the cor it i 
nents move back to the geographic positions 
they occupied at the tlmi Cross hairs 

zero in on the locality to be visited, and im 
ages of the animals that lived at that locati 
zoom up on the screen. Players can scroll 
around the scene selecting animals they would 
like to learn more about. Environmental d 
senptions are also available. In this way. wisi 
tors are introduced to many of the fossil 
relatives on display throughout the halls 
Electronic newspapers, similar to those 



installed outside the Museum first-floor Hall 
of Human Biology, will also be available in the 
Orientation I entei ("hree computei stations 
will offei the latest published Information i 
re< enl Imds and discoveries in the field of 
vertebrate evolution. 

Along the other wall of the center — as well 
as in a ten-minute presentation In Its theater 
— visitors can focus on another theme which 
animals arc most closely related to one an 
othi people are Interested In finding 

out about their own family histories -md one 
of the major pursuits ol paleontologists is to 
uncover the family history of differenl life 
forms. Scientists at the Museum have been 
Instrumental In developing new approaches to 
reconstructing evolutionary relationships, and 
the b "nt ol thi In the new exhl 

Wiii. -ii halls reflects the ai inimical evidence on 
whk li these relationships are based 

— Melissa Posen 

Members' Preview 

I .ii ml //Dual and Higher Member are In 
vited to preview the I tall ol Vertebrate ' Origin 
and the I Wentatton Center on Wednesday. 
lune I 2, from 4.00 to 900 p.m Volunteer 
Explainers will be on hand to tions 

! point out items ol parth ular interest No 
ii, | ire necessary for tin 

free pre our valid membership card 

i ticket of admission. 

Lecture Series and Workshop 

Mor- informatii >n on the contents of the 
new hall will be available i i lures: "On 

World of Vertebrate Fossil and I" 
io Little ( 
Foi etail on these lectures and on a special 
tiding and casting fish fos ill 
see page 4. 



Second Notices 



The following programs were announced in last 
month's Rotunda Unless otherwise specified, a 
limited number of tickets are still available. For de- 
tailed information on these listings, see the Apn 

of Rotunda These programs are open only to 
I , |y/Dual or Higher Members unless a non-Mem- 
bers' price is specified. 



Use the Tours and Work 
shops coupon on page 5 to 
register for the programs 
opposite 




N/WURAL 
HBTORY 



Time Travelers' 
Museum-Theater 

Live performance combined 
with a guided tour of one of 
Hi.' world's best-loved mu 
urns. Original dates sold out, 
Performance extended to one 
evening, May 18, 7:00-9:00 
p.m. $25 for Members; $30 
for non- Members. 

Fountaineering 

Members walking tour, led by 
Sid Horenstein Wednesday. 

8, either 4:30-6:00. 
i, nu-7 .30. or 7:30-9:00 
p.m. $20. 

Collecting and 
Identifying Insects 

Workshop conducted by Caro- 
line Chaboo. Two Wednes- 



days. May 22 and May 29. 
5.30-730 p.m. $40: ages 12 
and older. 

Discovering 
Washington 
Heights 

Members' walking tour of the 
uptown Manhattan neighbor- 
hood, led by Joyce Gold. Sat- 
urday. May 18. 2 00-4 00 
p.m. $25. 

Insects — Masters 
of the Earth 

Museum tour led by Robert 
Campanile. Friday, May 31, 
6:30 p.m. Free. 

Use the May Members' 
programs coupon on page 3 
to register for the program 
below: 

The Mind's Eye: 
Optical Illusions 
and Mental 
Deception 

Illustrated lecture on visual 
perception Wednesday, May 
15, 7:00-8:30 p.m. $6 for 
Members, $9 for 
non-Members 



Members' Walking Tour 



The 96th Street Mosque 

Saturday, June 15 

11:00 a.m.-l 2:30 p.m. 

$20 and open only to Family/Dual and Higher Members 



an hitect Mustafa 
Al M.I, ii i for a guided tour of 
the celebrated mosque that is 
the i enterpiccc of the Islamii 
i ultural < ientei al ["bird Av- 
enue and 96th Street The 
center, whli h serves a large 
part of greater New Yorl 
Islamic community was de- 
signed as a place of both wor- 
ship and social inter* rl m It 
houses .i . mosques tradition 
ally have i lassrooms and a 
library. 



According to an article 
about the site in the Architec- 
tural Record, Islamic tradi- 
tions were melded "with the 
best that twentieth-century 
tei hnology has to offer" In the 
center's design, which 
in. ludes a 130-foot minaret 
and a copper-clad dome 
topped by a gilded crescent 
pointing to Mecca. 

Abadan, who served as 
senior designer for the pro- 
ject, will lead participants 



through the mosque's interior 
and offer an overview of its 
exterior. He'll begin with an 
introduction to Islamic archi- 
tecture and describe the at- 
tempts to interpret traditional 
motifs within a modem-day 
urban context 

Women are requested to 
wear a head covering for this 
tour Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register, and 
please note that tickets are 
available only by mail. 



Flagging Blennies 

Wednesday, June 5 

7:00-8:30 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$6 for Members, $9 for non-Members 







Near dawn, close to a re- 
in, ite coral reei off the coast 
of Central America, a sallfin 
blenny emerge- hom j lu»k- m 
a fragment of dead coral It 
umikly raises and lowers Its 
in,-, several times before darl 
Into Its sheltei In thi 
nexl few hours, tins ritualistic 
display will be repeated ovei 
and ovei possibly as many as 
a thousand times before the 
sun sets Is thi bli ruv flag- 
g behavior a kind of com- 
munication? And whal Is the 
blennv 



During several decades of 
studying fish, C Lavett Smith, 
i urator emeritus m the De- 
partment of Ichthyology, has 
noted the appearance and 
Uhavior of hundreds of 
species. One of the most fas- 
cinating has proved to be the 
sallfin blenny. an inhabitant of 
coral reef ecosystems and a 
master of flagging and nest 
guarding. 

Since the development of 
mod* in diving equipment in 
the 1950s, ecologists have 
found that coral reefs, home 



to many diverse fish commu- 
nities, are ideal laboratories 
for studying how biodiversity 
arises and how it is 
maintained Tins lecture, illus- 
trated with slides and video- 
tape recordings made in the 
field over a period of four 
years, will focus on how the 
sailfin blenny uses food and 
shelter around the coral reef 
ecosystems in a unique way 

Use the Members' pro- 
grams coupon on page 3 
to register for this event. 



Vmerican Museum ..f Natural History 

Prv- 

Time Travelers' MiLseum-TheaUn- 

"Four Who Dared" 




i imiTpn bngagemem 

Friday & Saturday. May 3, 4, 10, 11, at 7:00 p, m 

imol Natural HikUwj 
I mi 79th Street New JToricCitj 

Reservations: 

US 'Oil '•'!' 

Ticket - 10 ! i VMND U en TDFaccepted 



Members 9 Birthday Parties 
at the Museum 



Young Members between 
the ages of 5 and 10 can 
celebrate another year of life 
with theme parties at the Mu- 
seum focusing on dinosaurs, 
fossil mammals, African mam- 
mals, ocean dwellers, and 
Native Americans. 

The parties are available 
only to Members at the Con- 
tributor ($100) and higher 
levels. The group should be 



no fewer than 10 and no 
more than 20. The fee is 
$300 plus $15 per child and 
covers all materials and the 
services of a Museum party 
coordinator, who will handle 
everything from candles to 
party favors. All you need to 
do is bring the cake and help 
escort the guests. 

For more information call 
(212)769-5542 



The Membership Office would like to thank the following young Mem 
ben; who celebrated their birthdays here recently: Daniel and Ariel Lieber- 
man, Henry Frelinghuysen. Charlie Jacobs, Alexander Bayer. Joshua 
Deutsch, Daniel Straus. Jonathan Yip, Benjamin Resnick. Hannah Upper, 
and Justin Reyes. 




ISSN 0194-6110 

Vol. 22, No. 5 
May 1996 

Michel DeMatteis — Editor 

Sheila Greenberg — Associate Director of Membership 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Peter Zelaya — Membership Coordinator 

Traci Buckner — Membership Associate 

Robert Jahn — Membership Associate 

Rotunda, a publication for Family/Dual and Higher 
Members of the American Museum of Natural History, is 
published monthly September through June, bimonthly July and 
August Publication offices are at the Membership Office, 
American Museum of Natural History. Central Park West at 7 L w 
Street, New York. NY 10024-5192. Telephone: (212) 769- 
5606. Subscriptions: $50 a year for Family/Dual Membership 
$100 a year for Contributor Membership. 
© 1996 American Museum of Natural History Second-class 
postage paid at New York. NY Postmaster: Please send address 
changes to: Rotunda, Membership Office, American Museum ol 
Natural History. Central Park West at 79th Street, New York. 
NY 10024-5192. 



Printed by Waldon Press, Inc., New York 



-£■-*•« 



And Now for Something Completely New 



The Museum is gradually 
implementing a computerized 
service for ticketing and reser- 
vations. Everything from visi- 
tors' entrance fees to tickets 
for all Museum and Planetar- 
ium events will soon be han- 

I by computer at all 
entrances and point-of-sale 
locations within the Museum 

The first phase is scheduled 
to go into effect this month, 
when visitors will be able to 
purchase tickets to any event 
scheduled for the day of their 

ii at their point of entry 
And soon, with one call to our 
Central Reservations Depart- 
ment, Members will be able to 
use their credit cards to re- 
serve and purchase tickets for 
all Museum and Planetarium 
events advertised in the pages 
of Rotunda. 

Stay tuned for more infor- 
mation on how to access this 
new service. 




The Planetarium's original Zeiss projector 



Members' Memo 

We'd Like To Hear From You 




Are there any Museum 
events and issues we've failed 
to cover in our pages? Are 
there things our readers would 
like to see appearing that 
aren't? Do you have any ques- 
tions or comments about our 
articles or the overall appear- 



ance of the newsletter? 

We would like to make 
Rotunda as informative, use- 
ful, and interesting as possible 
to Members. Since we're 
planning soon to produce our 
newsletter with improved 
technology, we think that it 



might be time for some 
changes, and we'd like those 
changes to encompass as 
many of our Members' needs 
and wishes as possible 

Do you think coupons and 
registration forms for events 
and programs are clear and 
easy to use? Would you like to 
see more copy about Mem- 
bers themselves? More am 
about the Museum itself ' 

Please send your thoughts 
to us, and help make a m 
improved Rotunda a reality. 
Write to: 

Editor, Rotunda 

American Museum of Natural 

History 

Central Park West at 79th St. 

New York, NY 10024-5192 

Attn: Membership Dept 

Or fax your comments to us 
at (212) 769-5427. 



Exhibit of the 

Dissecting a Gem 



Did you know that both 
sapphires and rubies are gems 
composed of the same mineral 
— corundum? A brilliant and 
rare gem material, corundum 
is noted for its durability, sec- 
ond only to that of diamonds. 

A ruby is a gem of a spe- 
■ ili< blood-red shade of corun- 
dum colored by chromium 
oxides Blue sapphires contain 
small amounts of titanium and 
iron oxides. Sapphires occur 
m many other colors, depend- 
ing on the traces of metal 
compounds or other minerals 
m them, and those that are 



not either blue or blue-violet 
are called "fancy sapphm 

The Museum has an out- 
standing collection of sappi 
on display. One of the most 
unusual is a 100-carat orange 
sapphire called Padparadschah. 
The name is a corruption of 
the Sanskrit pahd marga and 
describes a Sn Lankan lotus 
distinguished by an orange 
flower. The color in this stone 
is due to the presence of both 
chromium and feme iron 
within the corundum 

Gems are weighed in carats. 
One carat equals 200 



milligrams (or gram 2). and 
there are 141.75 carats in one 
ounce. Carat and karat are 
n thought of as the same 
thing, but karat is the unit of 
measure of gold purity (24- 
karat gold is pure gold). Both 
words most likely originated in 
an Arabic term used to desig- 
nate a pod or husk, probably 
from the carob tree. Carob 
seeds, due to 

irrn weights, were used in 
ancient marketplaces to bal- 

Ihe scales when me.i 
ing the weights of gems. 

— Erica Okone 



May Members' 
Programs Coupon 



N, hi ii' 



Address: 



City: 



Slat,' 



.Zip: 



1 >. iv i mie telephone: 



Membership category: 



I otal amount enclosed: 



Please make check (if applicable] payable to lh« American 
Museum of Natural History and in. ill with .i self- 
addressed, stamped envelope to: May M Pro 
grams, Membership Office American Museum ol Natural 
History, Central Park West at 79th Street, N< NY 
10024 5192 Telephone reservations are not accep- 
ted. 



Unless otherwise indicated, no more than eight 
tickets may be ordered for a program. Family/Dual 
Members are entitled to four tickets per program at 
the Members' price. Higher Members are entitled 
to six tickets, and Associate/Individual Members 
are entitled to one ticket. 



The Mind's Eye: Optical Illusions and Mental 

Deception. Wednesday Maj ; OOp.m 

Number of Members' tickets at $6 

Number dI additional tickets at $9: 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Flagging Bennies 

Wednesday, lune 5 al 7 00 p.m. 

Number of Memb> i its at $6: 

Number of additional tickets al $9 

Total amount enclosed for program: 

Danny and the Dinosaur Go to Camp 

Saturday, June I al 1 OOp.m 
Number of Members Ik kets at $10: 

Number of additional Hi keu al $15: 

Total amount enclosed for program 

Lecture Series 

The World of Vertebrate Fossils 

Wednesday. June 12. at 7 00 p.m. 

Number of Members' tickets at $6: 

Number of additional tickets at $9: 

Fossil Fishes: So Much Diversity. So Little Change 

Wednesday. June 19. at 1 . 00 p m 

Number of Members tickets at $6: 

Number of additional tickets at $9: 

Number of Members « both lectures at $10: 

NumberofadrliiM)ii«ih r both lecture! .it $16: — 



NOTE: No refunds/exchanges. Allow two weeks for 
your mail order. Call (212) 769-5606 for ticket 
availability or to verify receipt of your order. If less 
than two weeks remain, tickets can be purchased at 
the 77th St. entrance Members' Desk on weekends 
and holidays. 




Lecture Series: Hall of Vertebrate Origins 



Two nights, June 12 and 19 

7:00-8:30 p.m. 

Kaufmann Theater 

$6 for Members (or $10 for both lectures) 

$9 for non-Members (or $16 for both lectures) 



The World of 

Vertebrate 

Fossils 

Wednesday, June 1 2 

When the Hall ol Verte 
brate Origins opens it will 
complete the world s largest 
exhibition of vertebrate foi 
Although it is the last element 
in ihe fourth flooi exhibition 
project, it ai tually presents the 
opening chapter in ilu hook 

brate evolutii in 
| ugene S Gatfney, cur<>t<.i 
in the Departmenl ol Verte- 
brate Pali ontology, will dis- 
cus- the significance of the 
halls and explain why 

Fossil Fishes: 
So Much 
Diversity, So 
Little Change 

Wednesday, June 19 

I in, i ,1 the great i .iradoxes 
of vertebrate evi ilutii in is that 
fishes display such phenome- 
nal diversltj represent! 
ill in hall the world's 
total vertebrate spe< ies - yet 
have retained essentially the 
same anatomical plan for 
aboul 100 million years. 

John G. Maisey, curatoi in 
ii„ Departmenl ol Vertebrati 
Paleontology, will present 
Illustrated talk ,iU>m the evolu- 
tion ol flshi s 1 le will focus on 



cladistics — a new way of 
looking at evolutionary rela- 
tionships — is used as the 
organizing principle. Gaffney 
will give a brief overview of 
the exhibition project, includ- 
ing how specimens were cho- 
sen, prepared, and mounted. 
He will also discuss features of 
the first kind vertebrates and 
the main groups of tetrapods 
displayed in the halls: amphib- 
ians turtles plesiosaurs and 
ichthyosaurs, lizards, primitive 
archosaurs, and pterosaurs 
( iaffney, a curator since 
L970 was closely involved 
with the project for the new 
halls from its inception. He is 
a spei lallSl on the evolution of 
turtles and has done field work 
in Australia, Africa, and South 
America. 

the above paradox and will 
also discuss some of the ways 
in which i he study of fossil 
fishes throws light on our own 
fins 

Maisey received his doctor- 
ate in zoology and compara- 
iive anatomy from the 
University of London in 1974 
and joined the Museum in 
1 ' >79 His earlier research 
included studies "I extinct 
.Luis he now works exten- 
sively on Early Cretaceous 
fossil fishes from Brazil and 
Venezuela. His book Discov- 
ering Fossil Fishes will be 
available for purchase and 
book-signing. 

Use the May Members' 
programs coupon on page 
3 to register for one or 
both of the lectures in this 
series. 



l^UionyeTrs ago. Fossils ^ulhes^eofthe 

s£?3 rcMs stasia 

other animals were its closest evoluUonary ^rela- 
tives. Unfortunately, however, fossils do not an 
swer all our questions. \j PT te- 

As visitors walk through the ™ w . HaU .°{ **"* 
brate Origins, the labels will "P 1 ™"**'™ 
know-and don't know-about our long-extmct 

vertebrate relatives. -Melissa Posen 



Members' Fossil Casting Workshop 

Molding and Casting 
Fish Fossils 

Saturday, June 22 

10:00 a.m.— 1:00 p.m. 

$50, and open only to Family/Dual 

and Higher Members (ages 14 and older) 



We're 
Trying 
to 
Keep 

Up 



Our programs are growing in number and popularity and 
i in office staff sometimes experiences difficulties keeping up 
with the pace Members have voiced their concerns about 
this and we are listening. We'd like to remind you that tickets 
for all Members programs can be purchased on weekends 
and I" ilidays at the Membership Desk located at the 77th St 
entrance to the Museum. Credit card reservation and pur- 
se of tickets — one of the goals of the new Central 
ervatJons Department — is on its way. but meanwhile 
we'll continue doing everything possible to help you enjoy 
the programs you love. 

Membership Services Information 

For Museum events only (212) 769-5606 

Fbi lomik- Dual membership inquiries (800) 283-AMNH 



In conjunction with the 
opening of the Hall of Verte- 
brate Origins, Pamela Pope- 
son will host a workshop in 
which Members can learn the 
techniques used by Museum 
artisans to produce replicas of 
fossils. After preparing a fossil 
model, participants will con- 
struct a mold and then make a 
facsimile casting, creating 
their own reproduction plaque 
of a fish fossil 



Popeson has been working 
with artifacts and fine art ob- 
jects for over sixteen years. 
She currently heads the Fossil 
Reproduction Department, 
where she makes models, 
molds, and casts of specimens 
from the collections. Popeson 
has also taught art to children 
of all ages. 

Use the coupon on page 
5 to register. Tickets are 
available only by mail 



Provide For Your Future. . . 




And Enrich The Lives Of Others. 



Through a gift bo the American Museum of Natural History that 
provides lifetime income, you promote preservation and extend 
understanding of the natural world for generations to come and. n 
the sain.' tune, provide for your own retirement. If you are age 55 or 
older, you can 

• receive income for life, for yourself and/or a loved one; 

• enjoy an immediate income tax deduction; 

• decrease or eliminate capital gains tax when low-yield, 
highly appreciated stocks are sold to re-invest for higher income 

• reduce the cost — tlirough the combined benefits of an income 
stream and an immediate income tax deduction — of a gift 
important to the Museum's future. 

For more information, please call toll-free 1 (800) 453-5734 or 
complete and return this confidential reply form to Jane C. Palmer, 
Director of Planned Giving, Office of Development, American 
Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at. 79th Street, New 
York, NY 10024-5192. 



Please send me information on gifts that provide lifetime income, tax 
savings, and other benefits, while enriching the lives of others: 



Name: _ 
Address: 
I ity; 



Phone (home): 



.State: 

foffii e I 



_Zip: 



Tax and other financial benefits may depend on age. 

My (our) age(s): , . 

Youi " rii/ is confidential and implies rib obligation 



.-,!'•■ 



New Exhibit Opens in June 

Scientists and Journalists — 
One Story, Two Voices: 
A Century of Science Reporting 
in The New York Times 



The relationship between 
scientific research and its pre- 
sentation in the media is the 
subject of an exhibition open- 
ing June 26 outside the Hall 
of Human Biology. 

To explore this theme, the 
ibit will present enlarged 
facsimiles of onginal reports 
from The New York Times 
on significant discoveries and 
events during the past 100 
years of human evolutb in 
research These will be pre- 
sented along with commen- 
tary prepared by curator Ian 
Tattersall providing a modern 
perspective. 

The events and finds fea- 
tured in the exhibition include 
the 1 895 discovery of Java 
man (Homo erectus) by Eu- 
gene Dubois, the 1908 dis- 
covery of the Piltdown man in 



England and its subsequent 
exposure as a fraud in 1953. 
the Scopes Monkey Trial of 
1925. and the discovery of 
the Lascaux cave paintings. 
Also on view will be casts of 
the fossils mentioned in the 
articles as well as archival 
letters to the Museum's scien- 
tists from the discoverers of 
the relevant specimens. 

The exhibit, organized by 
Ian Tattersall in collaboration 
with John Noble Wilford, a 
Pulitzer Prize winning science 
writer for The New York 
Times, will be on view in the 
gallery space just outside the 
Hall of Human Biology and 
Evolution. The hall opened in 
April 1993 and is the coun 
try's only permanent exhibi- 
tion dedicated to an in-depth 
investigation of the mysteries 



of human ongins Tattersall 
served as its curatoi u ti I Is 
chairman and curator of tl 
Department of Anthropology. 

The Museum joins thl 
other New York City institu- 
tions in a simultaneous pre- 
sentation of exhibits marking 
the 100th anniversary of the 
purchase of The New York 
Times by Adolph S. Ochs 
"Pictures of the Times A 
Century of Photography from 
The New York Times'' at the 
Museum of Modem Ail 
"Headline. Deadline, and 
Byline: A Century of The 
New York Times Morgue, 
1896-1996" at the New York 
Public Library; and "Docu 
menting the Times: Adolpli s 
Ochs and the Early Years of 
The New York Times'' at the 
Pierpont Morgan Library. 




Members' Family Program 



Danny and the Dinosaur 
Go to Camp 



Saturday, June 1 

1:00-2:30 p.m.. Under Theater 

$10 for Members, $15 for non-Members 

Ages 3 and up 

Syd Hoff returns to the 
Museum in June to host an- 
other of his popular "chalk 
talks." The creator of the 
1958 children's classic Daring 
and the Dinosaur, Hoff will 
be making his third appear- 
ance here. In this program he 
will draw on an onstage easel 
and talk with participants 
about his work. 

Since his last visit. Hoff has 
written and illustrated two 
sequels to his original book — 
Happy Birthday. Danny the 
Dinosaur! (1995) and Danny 
and the Dinosaur Go to 
Camp, which was released 



this spring (both published by 
HarperCollins). Danny and 
the Dinosaur has been trans- 
lated into half a dozen lan- 
guages and sold more than 10 
million copies. 

The creator of many other 
works in the well-known I Can 
Read series. Hoff made the 
preliminary sketches for 
Danny and the Dinosaur 
right here at the Museum. He 
relates that the idea came to 
him one day while he was 
drawing pictures for his 
daughter, who was stricken 
with a physically debilitating 
condition, to take her mind off 



her physical therapy. Hoff S 
humorous designs are marked 
by simplicity, and he prefers 
to work in ink, washes, 
crayon, and watercolor. draw- 
ing on the New York neigh- 
borhoods in which he grew up 
for his cartoon characters. 

Participants will have the 
opportunity during this chalk 
talk to see simple lines be 
come funny pictures and to 
enjoy the animated film 
Danny and the Dinosaur 
produced by Weston Woods 
Hoff's newest books will be 
available for purchase at the 
event, and he will sign copies. 

All children and adults at- 
tending the program must 
have tickets, use the May 
Members' programs" 
coupon on page 3 to reg- 
ister for the event. 



Education Department Lecture 

The Sixth Extinction: 

Collapsing 

Biodiversity? 

Thursday, June 13 
7:00-8:30 p.m. 
$10 



Human actions resulting in 
the deforestation of the rain 
forests, for example, or the 
destruction of wild habitats 
are pushing species into ex- 
tinction at a rate rapidly ap- 
proaching one a minute. Early 
in the next century, fully half 
the world's species will have 
suffered this fate, qualifying 
this catastrophe as a mass 



extinction. On five different 
occasions in the history of our 

i t existing biodiversity 
collapsed by more than 50 
percent, followed by a rapid 

recovery. 

The question to ask about 
this sixth extinction is. Does it 
matter? Surprising answers 
can be found by looking at the 
question within the historical 



perspective gained from the 
fossil record. Roger Lewin, 
co-author with Richard 
Leakey of the new book The 
Sixth Extinction, discusses 
this and other related issues at 
this illustrated lecture. 

Lewin and Leakeys book 
will be available for purchi 
at the program, and Lev. 
will sign copies for parti' I 
pants. To register, send v 
check payable to the Ameri- 
can Museum of Natural His- 
tory, together with a 
self-addressed, stamped enve- 
lope, to: The Sixth Extinc 
tion. Education Department, 
Amencan Museum of Natural 
H^tory, Central Park West at 
79th St., New York. N Y 
10024-5192. If you have any 
questions, call (212) 
769-5310 






Above, an engraving in the Museum's Vertebrate 
Paleontology archives shows prominent figures 
from the early twentieth century controversy sur- 
rounding the discovery of the Piltdown skull 
(from left to right. T.O. Barlow, Elliott Smith. 
A.S. Underwood, A. Keith. Charles Dawson, A. 
Smith Woodward, W.P. Pycraft, and E. Ray Lan- 
caster), which was subsequently denounced as 
fraudulent. The history of the hoax, which 
remains unsolved, is one of the subjects brought 
into focus in the exhibit Scientists and Journalists: 
One Story, Two Voices. Below, drawings of the 
head of the Piltdown man by L.M. Sterling, after 
McGregor's restoration. 




Tours and Workshops I h this coupon to register foi 
Time Travelers Museum I heatei ' bui H hi 

May LS is still ivail.ihl.-) fountain.-- -mm., (in<li< 
i and second choice of times), < '0//© ling and 
Identtlvn Washington H< \ghts 

/ Ms , , is Wasters o) th< ' arth, Vow o) the 96 
Mosque, Mol' I Casting Fish Fossil irtof 

the Mask Tom 



Name(s)of program! | 



Number -l Hcket! and i n ice (please indicate which pro- 
gram if more than one): 



l.it.il amount enclosed:. 



Name:. 



Address: 
City: 



State 



Zip: 



Daytime telephone: 



Membership category- 

e make check payable to the American Museum 
of Natural History and mail with a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope to Tours and Win I- 
bership Office American Museum of Natum 

79th Street New York, NY 10024- 






Members' Guided Tour 

Art of the Mask 

Friday, June 28 
7:00-8:30 p.m. 



This tour will travel through 
oul ill.' .inthropology halls to 
consider the unifying theme of 

..Ins, mi, s rii h i "II' ''ion 
of masks With guide Susan 
Shackter. participants will 
vieu f the oldest masks 

in the collect! veral dat- 

ing back as much as 2,500 

ye.ii 

Tour members will also 



ks from New 
Guinea's Sepik River region, 
Japanese Noh masks, and 

Ian Buddhist masks, con- 
sidering them not only from 
il„ aesthetic point of view but 

,! foeil cultural 
significance in Individual 
eties. Shackter will talk about 
the relation of African masks 
to the work of Picasso, of 



Northwest Coast Indian masks 
to the work of surrealist Max 
Ernst, and of Mexican masks 
to the work of Rufino 
Tamayo. 

This tour is free of charge 
to Family/Dual and Higher 
Members, but please note that 
all attendees must have tick- 
ets. Use the coupon on 
page 5 to register. 




iMNM I 



Three aspects of one of the most remarkable 
pieces in the museums's Northwest Coast collec- 
tion, a Kwakiutl triple transformation mask. 
Transformation masks are among the most dra- 
matic pieces made by the Kwakiutl. This example, 
in wood, could be snapped open during a dance 
to reveal beings entirely different from one an- 
other. When completely shut, it represents a smil- 
ing bullhead fish, when first opened a sea raven, 
and when fully opened the hero known as Siwidi. 
or "Born-to-be-the-Head-of-the-World. " 



Endangered Africa 



In January 1997. Discovery 
Tours will embark on its most 
in-depth exploration of Africa 
to date to examine some of 
the endangered cultures and 
habitats on this vast and fasci- 
nating continent 

Nowhere but in Africa, with 
its almost mystical allure, can 
travelers find great herds of 
big game roaming freely on 
the plains as they have for 
thousands of years, an abun- 
dance of extraordinary and 
complex cultures, and a diver- 
sity of terrain that includes 
vast deserts, snow-capped 
mountains, thundering water- 
falls, and the world's most 
spectacular geological depres- 
sion, the Great Rift Valley 
Underlying Africa's timeless 
beauty and magnetism, how- 
ever, is the fact that habitat 
destruction and the loss of 
biodiversity threaten its wildlife 
and traditional cultures as 
never before 

In addition to visiting places 
such as Victoria Falls and Mar- 
rakech, participants will view 
areas that are normally 
restricted (the Museum has 
obtained special permission for 
these visits). Arrangements 



have also been made to visit 
with field biologists and anthro- 
pologists to examine current 
conservation practices and 
explore complex problems and 
issues with those who are com- 
mitted to protecting Afnca s 
irreplaceable resources. 

The tour focuses on nati 
history, prehistory, ecology, 
and ethnography and will be 
enhanced with a stimulating 
education program presented 
by some of Discovery Tours' 
most popular experts — 
Michael Novacek, Ian Tatter- 
sall. Melanie Stiassny. John 
Van Couvering. Enid Schild- 
krout, and Joel Cracraft 

On this Discovery Tour, 
participants will travel on a 
specially chartered, all-first- 
class Boeing 757. allowing for 
an itinerary that includes some 
of Africa's most remote and 
diverse areas in Tunisia. 
Ethiopia, South Africa. 
Namibia, and Mali. The price 
is $25,950 per person, dou- 
ble occupancy. For more in- 
formation, call Discovery 
Tours at (800) 462-8687. or 
at (212) 769-5700. 
Monday-Friday from 9:00 
a.m. to 5:00 p.m. 



What's New 

at the Museum Shops 



Visit the Museum Shops 
often to see changing dis- 
plays of merchandise related 
not only to the Museum's 
exhibits but also to the 
changing seasons. The Main 
Shop on the first floor is 
currently featuring a selection 
of items related to the exhibi- 
tion Witness. Endangered 
Species of North America, 
now in Gallery 77 The 
Amber Shop on the third 
floor continues to offer a 
fabulous assortment of amber 
jewelry, scientific specimens, 
books, and other amber- 



related merchandise at all 
price points from fifty cents 
to $10,000. 

The Nature Shop on the 
second floor continues to 
carry a selection of products 
for bird enthusiasts for the 
spring binding season. Of 
course all of the shops in the 
Museum stock a wonderful 
array of T-shirts, posters, 
books, jewelry, cards, and 
decorative objects related to 
the Museum's permanent 
collections. Come — see 
what the Museum shops have 
in store for you. 




SPRING^IS « E R 

Celebrate 



Mother's Day 

Sunday, May 12th, from I lam to 4 pm 

Serving 

Carved Leg <>f Land) 

• Whole Roast Chicken • 

Specialty Pastas, prepared by our Chef 

Spring Salads and a whole lot more' 

Dessert and Beverages Included! 

Adults $17.95 Children under 10. $8 95 
Reservations suggested 

Call the Garden Cafe at 212-769 5865 





Museum Notes 




Hours 

Exhibition Hall? 

Morv -Thurs. & Sun 1000 a m -5 45 p.m. 

Fm & Sat 10:00 am.-8-.45 p.m. 

The Museum Shop 

Mon -Thurs & Sun 1000 a m -545 p.m. 

Fri.&Sat 10:00 a.m. -7:45 p.m. 

The Junior Shop 

Mon-Fri. . . 10:00 a.m. -445 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun 1 0:00 a.m.-545 p.m. 

The Museum Library 

Tues-Fn 1 100 am -4:00 p.m. 

The Natural Science Center 

There are many wild places in the New York 
City area, and the Natural Science Center fea- 
tures Hue plants and animals from these local 
habitats. Closed Mondays and holidays 

Tues-Fri. . 2:00-430 p.m. 

Sat. & Sun. 1:00-4:30 p.m. 

The Discovery Room 

A hands-on examination of artifacts and spt 
mens awaits visitors to the Discovery Room. Chil- 
dren must be 5 or older and accompanied by an 
adult. Closed weekdays and holidays 

Sat. & Sun Noon-4:30 p.m. 

Museum Dining 

Diner Saurus Fast Service Eatery 

Dailv 11 00 a. m -4:45 p.m. 

Garden Cafe 

Reservations. (212) 769-5865 

Lunch Mon-Fn 1 1:30 a.m. -3:30 p.m. 

Dinner: Fri. & Sat 5:00-730 p m 

Brunch Sat & Sun 1 1:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 

Whale's Lair 

Fn .3:00-8:00 p.m. 

Sat Noon-8:00 p.m. 

Sun. & most holidays Noon-5:00 p.m. 

Snack Carts 
Sat. & Sun 11:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. 



Entrances 
During Wua lire visitors can enter the 

building through the 77th Street entrant - the 

Planctanum entrance (81st Street', the lust and 
■ nd-floor Roosevelt Memorial Hall entran 

(79th Street and Central Park West), Of through 
the subway entrance Visitors attending pro- 
grams after hours can enter the building at 
79th Street and Central Park West or 
through the parking lot at 81st Street. 



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Happenings 
at the 
Hayden 



Lectures 

Frontiers in Astronomy and 
Astrophysics 

On Monday, May 20, Richard Binzel. professor of 
earth and planetary sciences at MIT. will present an 
illustrated talk. "Near Earth Asteroids - Fnends or 

Foes?" . , _., 

This lecture is part of the Frontiers in Astronomy 
and Astrophysics senes. Tickets are $6 for 
Family/Dual and Higher Members and $8 for non- 
Members. For more information about ticket aval abil- 
ity and upcoming lectures, call (212) 769-5900. Use 
the coupon on this page to order tickets for the May 
lecture 



Sky Show 

Cosmic Mind Bogglers: 

A Tour of Astronomical Extremes 

From the recent explosive comet impact on the 
planet Jupiter to what happens to your body as you 
fall into a black hole to the first few moments after 
the Big Bang origin of the universe, this Sky Show 
takes you on a romp through the most exotic ana 
mind-boggling phenomena in the universe. 

Showtimes: _ __ a . QA _ _ 

Mon-Fn 130. 230. 3:30. & 4:30 p.m. 

Sat 1 00. 2 00. 300. 4:00. & 500 pm 

Sun 100. 200. 3:00. & 4:00 p.m. 

Admission (Family/Dual and Higher Members) 

Adults $5 
Children (2-12)-. $3 

Call (212) 769-5100 for non-Members' prices 



Phone Numbers „*■„«„ 

Museum information . (212) 769-5100 

Planetarium Information £12)769-5900 

Education Department (212) J69 .310 

Discovery Toils (212)769 

toll-free i iiitslde NY State: (800) 462-8687 
IMAX 

Development (212) 769-5270 
Commun.cat.cns 

Volunteer Of Ik, ..(212 769-5 56 6 

Museum Shop (212)769 150 

library Services (212)769 .400 

Natural History magazine (2 1 ; ) 769 5500 

Memln > s ( hoice Collection (2 1 2) 769-5530 

Members BirthdayPart.es (212) 769 .542 

Planned Giving Office (212) 769-5119 
i-.ll free outside NY State: (800) -I 

Parking 

Paid parking is ,iv..il,.u> tm those attending 
Museum programs ("he parking lot Is open -'very 
day from 7:00 am. till 11 30 p.m [Tie parking lol 
has a capacity of 100 vehicles and Is open on <i Rrsl 
come, first -served basis 

Call the Membership Office al (212) /<o5606 
for information about additional parking. 



Exhibit 

Interpretations of the Cosmos: 
A Retrospective of Art Used jn 
Planetarium Sky Shows and Exhibits 

For nearly every show and exhibit in the 60-year 
history of the Hayden Planetarium, art was created 
in the cause of science. Sketches, paintings models, 
and photographs have been selected from the 
Hayden archives and put on display for this retro- 
spective of space art From renditions of the sun 
moon and planets to portrayals of galaxies and the 
distant universe, the art has always captured the 
most exciting science of the times. 



Children's Shows 

Special shows for children and theli families are 
offered every Saturday and Sunday at 1 1:00 a.m. 

Teddys Quest, for ages 3 to 9. tells the story of a 
teddy bear who travels through space and discovers 
the answers to such questions as how stars are 
formed how to identify constellations, and what it s 
like on the moon. Every Sunday at 1 1:00 a.m. 

Wonderful Sky is a special Sky Show tor 
preschoolers. Children sing along with images ot 
their favorite Sesame Street Mupi > iey learn 

about rainbows, the phases of the moon, sunsets, 
and stars Sat.. May 4. at 11:00 am 

The Secret of the Cardboard R. n ket, for ages 6 
to 9 explores all of the major objects in our solar 
system, including the sun. moon, all nine plane! 
and some of their satellite* Saturdays, May 1 1 and 

Robots in Space features Lucasfilm's R2D2 and 
C-3PO- and has been created especially for children 
aqes 7 to 12 Together with a live host, these 
mous space robots take children on a journey rom 
the earth to other planets and distant black h< .1 
Sat. May 25. at 11:00am 

ets can be purchased the day of the show. 
Admission for Family/Dual and Higher Members 
is $5 for adults and $3 for children Members can 
ourchase up to four tickets at the Members p. 
For addLnal informat.on. call (212) '00 



Laser Light Shows 

Journey into another dimension where last I - 
als and rock musii .■..mlunetocreateadaz/lm- 
experience of sight a... I souni I Showsan presented 
on Friday and Satui.U:. .t 7 00 8:30 and l'»00 
p m For prices and show schedule, telephone 
(212)769-5100. 

It's always a good idea to call before visit- 
ing the Planetarium, since prices, programs, 
and showtimes are subject to change without 
notice. For general Planetarium information, 
call (212) 769-5100. 



Lecture: Near Earth Asteroids — Friends 
or Foes?" Monday, May 20. 730 p m 

Number of Mi 

(no more than 4 — 

Number of non-MemU if $8: . 

Total amount enclosed for program: — 



Name 



• Address: 



City: 



State: Zip: 



I Daytime telephone: 

i Membership category: . 

! Please make check payable to the Hayden 
J p|.,. m and mail with a self-addressed. 

! stamped envelope to Lecture, Hayden Pla 
; n ,,,„ rium Central Park Wesl al Bis! street. New 
| York, NY 10024-51' >' 

! Please note that ticket orders are subjei 

bility and cannot be processed without 
J telephone number and stamped II . ,. 1< 1,.- . ..-. I 
' envelope Do not incluc'e ticket requests or 
! checks for American Mi'seum programs. 
i 















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miff 




For Family/Dual and Higher Members of the American Museum of Natural History 



Vol. 23. N«. 6 I' 



A Nineteenth-Century 
Naturalist Revisited 

Purposeful Traveler: 
Titian Ramsay Peale 

Library Gallery, Fourth Floor 
Opens May 31 



• 




An exhibition tracing the life work 
of a passionate field observer and 
collector, a skilled artist, and an in- 
trepid explorer is now on view in the 
Library Gallery Titian Ramsay Peale 
(1799-1885), termed a "forgotten 
naturalist" by Frederic Lucas (Museum 
director, 1911 to 1923), began his 
career at the age of eighteen, first on 
an expedition to collect flora and 
fauna in Florida and the Sea Islands of 
Georgia and later accompanying the 
Long expedition to the Rocky Moun- 
tains as assistant naturalist. 



Left, self-portrait, oil 
vas. circa 1835; right 
graph by Peale. 



Peale inherited a legacy of both 
artistic talent and passion for natural 
history from his father, founder of the 
Peale Museum in Philadelphia, often 
called the first science museum in 
America. From 1822 to 1838. apart 
from holding administrative positions 
in his father's museum, he collected 
specimens and made drawings for 
Charles Lucien Bonaparte's four-vol- 
ume American Ornithology, drew 
some of the plates for Thomas Say s 
three-volume American Entomology, 
and traveled to the interior of Colom- 




'"'■'-•■ ,. . . .... 



bia to collect specimens. Dunng this 
period he was also represented at 
exhibitions of the Pennsylvania 
Academy of the Fine Arts with water- 
color drawings of animals. 

The most promising assignment of 
his career came when he was 
appointed as naturalist on the I 
South Seas Surveying and Exploring 
Expedition, known as the Chat 
Wilkes expedition. Peale spent four 
years on this assignment, circling I 
globe collecting specimens and arti 
facts and later contnbuting illustrations 



Okavango: Africa's Last 

Eden was published to great acclaim two 
years ago The book of photographs and text by 
Frans Lanting, one of the world's leading wildlife 
and wilderness photographers, emerged from 
Lantings voyage to the bleak Kalahari Desert oj 
northern Botswana. George Schaller. writing m 
The New York Times, said the photographs taKe 
creatures that have become ordinary and familiar 
and transform them into haunting new visions. 
The i ,/ the same name, which has already 

toured Europe and elsewhere will >pen August * 
In the Museums Akeley Gallery. See m 
month s issue of Rotunda for more details 
Shown here a yellow-billed stork with nesting 
material 




to the atlas of the exp 'port on 

mammalogy and ornithology. The 
, i mtroversy surrounding the recepii- »n 
of this volume, however, u >jor 

disappointment In Peak lit'' 

Later Peale worked as an examiner 
hi the U.S. Patent i iffu. I.bbledin 
tin emerging techniques of photogra- 
and continued painting ami work 
Ing on in- manua ripl i >1 butterflli 
l I, died at the age of 85. leavl 
magnum opus unpublished 

On display at the i Ibrary Gallery will 
be many Peale materials that have not 
been previou btted elsewhen 

Four years ago the Library received a 
substantial gilt "I some Items and a 
long-term loan ol others from the 
descendants of Peale's second wife. 

the Shehadl fan 

The exhibition will Include a 
Hon ol Peale •■ natural history illu 

Uons Oil paintings, and original 
photographs. Irti luding All prl 
billa he a 
SouthS. 
lllustral i from his unpublished 

Diurnal 

Lei 

Wh« 

doptera Americana will also be 
view 



\ i 
I 









T 



• 



Second Notices 

The following programs were announced in last 
month's Rotunda Unless otherwise specified, a 
limited number of tickets are still available. For de- 
tailed information on these listings, see the May 
issue of Rotunda. These programs are open only to 
Family/Dual or Higher Members unless a non-Mem- 
bers" price is specified. 




URAL 
TORY 



Use the Tours and Work- 
shops Coupon on page 5 to 
register for the programs 
below: 

The 96th St. 
Mosque 

Members' walking tour of the 
mosque at the Islamic Cultural 
Center, led by Mustafa 



Abadan. Saturday, June 15; 
ll:00a.m.-12:30p.m. $20 

Molding and 
Casting Fish 
Fossils 

Members' workshop, con- 
ducted by Pamela Popeson. 
Saturday. June 22. 10.00 
a.m.-l:00p.m. $50 



Art of the Mask 

Members' guided tour, led by 
Susan Shackter. Friday. June 
28. 7:00-8:30 p.m. Free of 
charge to Family/Dual and 
Higher Members. 



Use the June Members' 
programs coupon on page 3 
to register for the programs 
below. 

Flagging Blennies 

Slide illustrated lecture by 
Museum ichthyologist C. 
Lavett Smith. Wednesday, 
June 5, 7:00-8:30 p.m. $6 
for Members, $9 for non- 
Members 

Lecture Series: 
Hall of Vertebrate 
Origins 

"The World of Vertebrate 
Fossils " Speaker, Eugene S. 
Gaffney Wednesday. June 
12. 

"Fossil Fishes: So Much Diver- 
sity. So Little Change " 
Speaker, John G. Maisey. 
Wednesday. June 19. 
Both lectures, 7:00-8.30 
p.m. $6 for Members ($10 for 
the series) and $9 for non- 
Members ($16 for the series). 

Danny and the 
Dinosaur Go to 
Camp 

We regret that Syd Hoff's 
"chalk talk'' program has been 
canceled. 




Rocky outcrops are often hidden 
delights in Central Park. 

Education Department Program 

Exploring Urban 
Geology and Nature 

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 



July 16, 18, 23, 
and 25 

5:30-8:30 p.m. 
$35, limited to 
30 people 



mg maps as a basic tool 
of discovery, ihe geol- 

ogy and nature of New York's 
Park through a combi 
nation workshop, field trip, 
and lectutv 



This unusual four-session 
series directed by Sidney 
Horenstein, coordinator of 
environmental public pro- 
grams, begins with a tour of 
the Museum's exhibits that 
pertain to our own New York 

area. 

With this background infor- 
mation the group will then 
visit Central Park, breaking 
up into small teams who will 
make their own topographic 
maps of sections of the park, 
learning how to plot rock 
outcrops, plants, lampposts, 
and other features 

In the third and fourth ses- 
sions, participants will be 
shown how to use and inter- 
pret the maps they have cre- 
ated, There will also be an 
introduction to geologic 
maps. The program 
concludes with a detailed 
exploration of several addi- 
tional rock outcrops in Cen- 
tral Park to see how they are 
related to one another. 



To register, send your 
check payable to the 
American Museum off 
Natural History. Central 
Reservations Depart- 
ment. American 
Museum of Natural His- 
tory. Central Park West 
at 79th St.. New York. 
N.Y. 10024-5192. 



lj^ m jhcVnhin tt, ' ,r department 

The Earth as a Peppercorn: 
A Planet Walk 

Sunday, June 16 
l:00-2:30p.m. 



Its difficult to picture the dimensions of the solar 

stcm _ the planets are relatively small and distances 
between them almost absurdly great. A model whose ^seal- 
true to size and distances, however, was devised in 1969 by 
astronomer/teacher Guy OttewelL 

The planet walk is a 1.000-yard model scaled to the sun and 
laid out by participants pacing out the distances, using natural 
objects to stand in the place of the planets. In this scale model 
the earth, in fact, is a peppercorn 

Join guides Robert Campanile and Phil Sollec.to on this 
journey of discovery around the grounds of the Museum, begin- 
ning on the front steps of the Planetarium at 81st Street and 
Central Park West The tour is free and no registration 
is necessary. Call the Volunteer Office at (212) 
769-5566 iff you have any questions. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 



New Date for 

Members 9 Preview — 

Hall of Vertebrate Origins 



The Museum has decided 
to move up the date for the 
opening of the Hall of Verte- 
brate Origins and the Miram 
and Ira D Wallach Orienta- 
tion Center on the fourth 
floor The new date for the 
opening to the public is June 
8. We regret that we were 
unable to inform our readers 
of this change before our May 
issue of Rotunda went to 
press. For those who look 
forward to our Members' 
Previews, however, we have 
been able to reschedule that 



event for Friday, June 7. from 
4:00 to 9:00 p.m. 

As always, Volunteer Ex- 
plainers will be on hand to 
answer questions and point 
out items of particular inter- 
est. No reservations are 
necessary; your valid member 
ship card is your ticket of 
admission. 

We sincerely regret any 
inconvenience this change in 
schedule presents to Mem- 
bers, and we look forward to 
seeing you at the Preview of 
the new fourth-floor halls. 




ISSN 0194-6110 

Vol. 23. No. 6 
June 1996 

Michel DeMatteis — Editor 

Sheila Greenberg — Associate Director of Membership 

Angela Soccodato — Designer 

Rita Campon — Copy Editor 

Peter Zelaya — Membership Coordinator 

Traci Buckner — Membership Associate 

Robert Jahn — Membership Associate 

Rotunda, a publication for Family/Dual and Higher 
Members of